Arquivo da tag: Amazônia

Protecting half of the planet is the best way to fight climate change and biodiversity loss – we’ve mapped the key places to do it (The Conversation)

theconversation.com

Greg Asner – September 8, 2020


Humans are dismantling and disrupting natural ecosystems around the globe and changing Earth’s climate. Over the past 50 years, actions like farming, logging, hunting, development and global commerce have caused record losses of species on land and at sea. Animals, birds and reptiles are disappearing tens to hundreds of times faster than the natural rate of extinction over the past 10 million years.

Now the world is also contending with a global pandemic. In geographically remote regions such as the Brazilian Amazon, COVID-19 is devastating Indigenous populations, with tragic consequences for both Indigenous peoples and the lands they steward.

My research focuses on ecosystems and climate change from regional to global scales. In 2019, I worked with conservation biologist and strategist Eric Dinerstein and 17 colleagues to develop a road map for simultaneously averting a sixth mass extinction and reducing climate change by protecting half of Earth’s terrestrial, freshwater and marine realms by 2030. We called this plan “A Global Deal for Nature.”

Now we’ve released a follow-on called the “Global Safety Net” that identifies the exact regions on land that must be protected to achieve its goals. Our aim is for nations to pair it with the Paris Climate Agreement and use it as a dynamic tool to assess progress towards our comprehensive conservation targets.

Population size of terrestrial vertebrate species on the brink (i.e., with under 1,000 individuals). Most of these species are especially close to extinction because they consist of fewer than 250 individuals. In most cases, those few individuals are scattered through several small populations. Ceballos et al, 2020., CC BY

What to protect next

The Global Deal for Nature provided a framework for the milestones, targets and policies across terrestrial, freshwater and marine realms required to conserve the vast majority of life on Earth. Yet it didn’t specify where exactly these safeguards were needed. That’s where the new Global Safety Net comes in.

We analyzed unprotected terrestrial areas that, if protected, could sequester carbon and conserve biodiversity as effectively as the 15% of terrestrial areas that are currently protected. Through this analysis, we identified an additional 35% of unprotected lands for conservation, bringing the total percentage of protected nature to 50%.

By setting aside half of Earth’s lands for nature, nations can save our planet’s rich biodiversity, prevent future pandemics and meet the Paris climate target of keeping warming in this century below less than 2.7 degrees F (1.5 degrees C). To meet these goals, 20 countries must contribute disproportionately. Much of the responsibility falls to Russia, the U.S., Brazil, Indonesia, Canada, Australia and China. Why? Because these countries contain massive tracts of land needed to reach the dual goals of reducing climate change and saving biodiversity.

Supporting Indigenous communities

Indigenous peoples make up less than 5% of the total human population, yet they manage or have tenure rights over a quarter of the world’s land surface, representing close to 80% of our planet’s biodiversity. One of our key findings is that 37% of the proposed lands for increased protection overlap with Indigenous lands.

As the world edges closer towards a sixth mass extinction, Indigenous communities stand to lose the most. Forest loss, ecotourism and devastation wrought by climate change have already displaced Indigenous peoples from their traditional territories at unprecedented rates. Now one of the deadliest pandemics in recent history poses an even graver additional threat to Indigenous lives and livelihoods.

To address and alleviate human rights questions, social justice issues and conservation challenges, the Global Safety Net calls for better protection for Indigenous communities. We believe our goals are achievable by upholding existing land tenure rights, addressing Indigenous land claims, and carrying out supportive ecological management programs with indigenous peoples.

Preventing future pandemics

Tropical deforestation increases forest edges – areas where forests meet human habitats. These areas greatly increase the potential for contact between humans and animal vectors that serve as viral hosts.

For instance, the latest research shows that the SARS-CoV-2 virus originated and evolved naturally in horseshoe bats, most likely incubated in pangolins, and then spread to humans via the wildlife trade.

The Global Safety Net’s policy milestones and targets would reduce the illegal wildlife trade and associated wildlife markets – two known sources of zoonotic diseases. Reducing contact zones between animals and humans can decrease the chances of future zoonotic spillovers from occurring.

Our framework also envisions the creation of a Pandemic Prevention Program, which would increase protections for natural habitats at high risk for human-animal interactions. Protecting wildlife in these areas could also reduce the potential for more catastrophic outbreaks.

Nature-based solutions

Achieving the Global Safety Net’s goals will require nature-based solutions – strategies that protect, manage and restore natural or modified ecosystems while providing co-benefits to both people and nature. They are low-cost and readily available today.

The nature-based solutions that we spotlight include: – Identifying biodiverse non-agricultural lands, particularly prevalent in tropical and sub-tropical regions, for increased conservation attention. – Prioritizing ecoregions that optimize carbon storage and drawdown, such as the Amazon and Congo basins. – Aiding species movement and adaptation across ecosystems by creating a comprehensive system of wildlife and climate corridors.

We estimate that an increase of just 2.3% more land in the right places could save our planet’s rarest plant and animal species within five years. Wildlife corridors connect fragmented wild spaces, providing wild animals the space they need to survive.

Leveraging technology for conservation

In the Global Safety Net study, we identified 50 ecoregions where additional conservation attention is most needed to meet the Global Deal for Nature’s targets, and 20 countries that must assume greater responsibility for protecting critical places. We mapped an additional 35% of terrestrial lands that play a critical role in reversing biodiversity loss, enhancing natural carbon removal and preventing further greenhouse gas emissions from land conversion.

But as climate change accelerates, it may scramble those priorities. Staying ahead of the game will require a satellite-driven monitoring system with the capability of tracking real-time land use changes on a global scale. These continuously updated maps would enable dynamic analyses to help sharpen conservation planning and help decision-making.

As director of the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, I lead the development of new technologies that assess and monitor imminent ecological threats, such as coral reef bleaching events and illegal deforestation, as well as progress made toward responding to ecological emergencies. Along with colleagues from other research institutions who are advancing this kind of research, I’m confident that it is possible to develop a global nature monitoring program.

The Global Safety Net pinpoints locations around the globe that must be protected to slow climate change and species loss. And the science shows that there is no time to lose.

Eduardo Góes Neves: ‘O Brasil não tem ideia do que é a Amazônia’ (Gama)

Fabrizio Lenci

Texto original

A mentalidade colonial, o racismo ambiental e a política são os maiores desafios da floresta. A análise é do arqueólogo Eduardo Góes Neves

Isabelle Moreira Lima – 30 de Agosto de 2020

A Amazônia é uma incompreendida. É regida por uma mentalidade colonial, com decisões tomadas de fora para dentro. E é justamente por isso que sua preservação é um imenso desafio. A análise é do arqueólogo Eduardo Góes Neves, que pesquisa a Amazônia há 30 anos. Professor Titular de Arqueologia Brasileira do Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia da Universidade de São Paulo, onde é vice-diretor, ele mantém a pesquisa de campo em estados como Rondônia e Acre pelo menos três meses por ano.

Em idas e vindas à floresta, Neves viu a política e postura local mudar ao longo dos anos. Infrações, antes operadas de maneira discreta, estão hoje mais escancaradas, assim como a violência e a truculência em relação às populações indígenas e o pouco caso do governo em relação ao desmatamento, o maior problema de todos, que está em marcha acelerada.

Um complicador é a distância, não só geográfica, mas cultural e de identificação. “Existe uma ignorância muito grande por parte do Brasil, e mesmo na Amazônia, sobre o que é a Amazônia”, diz ele que afirma que apesar da pesquisa de 30 anos sabe muito pouco e que não quer dar “carteirada” de cientista.

Ainda assim, Neves mantém certo espírito otimista e aponta caminhos. O primeiro e mais urgente é parar o desmatamento. O segundo, olhar para as comunidades indígenas — segundo sua pesquisa, foram eles que formaram a floresta tal qual a conhecemos ao longo dos milênios. “Os índios levaram 12 mil anos para formar essa Amazônia e em 40 anos a gente está acabando, acabamos com 20% dela sem gerar riqueza”, afirma.

Integrante do Painel Científico para a Amazônia (SPA, na sigla em inglês), iniciativa ligada à Rede de Soluções para o Desenvolvimento Sustentável da ONU, ele trabalha em uma das frentes que formará um diagnóstico da situação atual e vai apresentá-lo em março do ano que vem para municiar formadores de opinião que esperam proteger a região com base científica. Abaixo você lê algumas das descobertas do arqueólogo e sua perspectiva da Amazônia no passado, no presente e do que ela pode ser no futuro.

G |No fim do ano passado você ganhou um prêmio na China de reconhecimento pela sua pesquisa. Você sente esse trabalho ameaçado pelo contexto político e pelas últimas movimentações na região amazônica?

Eduardo Góes Neves | Acho que sim, toda pesquisa científica está ameaçada no Brasil hoje em dia, não só pesquisa arqueológica. Claramente está no poder hoje um grupo de pessoas que tem uma postura obscurantista, com uma visão crítica à ciência, ao conhecimento, à educação, então isso é uma ameaça. Passa por questões desde assédio administrativo e perseguição a corte de recursos. No meu caso, fica mais complicado ainda porque a Amazônia está sendo muito atacada também. No ano passado, em um trabalho de campo entre Acre e Rondônia, eu pedi autorização para trabalhar numa fazenda e pela primeira vez em muitos anos o proprietário negou. Nessa mesma etapa de campo, eu vi um céu amarelo inédito que me chamou atenção. Logo depois começaram a sair os dados das queimadas, que estão aumentando muito. Existe uma autorização tácita [para a destruição]. Não é nem tácita, é explícita mesmo, está liberado; abriu a porteira, como falou o ministro.

G |A boiada já está passando?

EGN | Desde o ano passado. Quem trabalha na Amazônia com patrimônio cultural e indígena, como é o caso da arqueologia, sente essa mudança.

G |Já se sentiu em risco enquanto você trabalhava lá?

EGN | Eu nunca fui ameaçado. Mas um colega foi assassinado na minha frente há 15 anos. Estou numa situação relativamente favorável, porque eu estou em São Paulo, ligado a uma instituição pública estadual, a USP, mas tenho colegas arqueólogos e arqueólogas que vivem lá no norte, em Santarém, em Rondônia, que estão ali na bucha do canhão, recebem ameaças, vivem uma situação de intimidação que é muito mais clara e sensível hoje em dia. O pessoal está armando as milícias, literalmente. Então eu prevejo que a gente vai passar por momentos mais difíceis agora, que essa situação vai ficar mais complicada.

G |Por que as coisas estão mais explícitas?

EGN | Os partidos de centro-direita no Brasil domesticavam um pouco a direita brasileira e agora não precisa mais. Há uma bomba armada, uma parte da direita brasileira encontrou uma voz no Bolsonaro, perdeu essa vergonha, esse pudor e está falando. Há três semanas, no Acre, um fazendeiro passou a máquina em sítios geoglifos, que são estruturas de terra. Segundo ele, foi um tratorista da fazenda que não sabia. A gente tem que dar o benefício da dúvida, mas são valas de mais de um metro de profundidade, são muito marcadas. E esse cara é presidente da Federação da Agricultura do Acre, alguém importante, uma liderança rural. As pessoas estão testando mesmo, vendo até onde isso vai, enquanto o poder de fiscalização do Estado está muito enfraquecido.

G |Na sua pesquisa você diz que a Amazônia não deve ser vista como uma floresta natural, mas como resultado de manejos populacionais ao longo de milênios. E que 90% dos resquícios de vegetação encontrados nos sítios não são identificáveis com as espécies que temos hoje. O que isso diz sobre a Amazônia de hoje?

EGN | A sociedade brasileira não tem a menor ideia do que é a Amazônia. Mesmo em Manaus, se conversamos com a média dos cidadãos manauaras, a maioria não tem uma relação de pertencimento, de identidade com a região. Não quero simplificar algo que é complexo, mas é como em São Paulo, só muda a escala: tem uma parte da elite que não se vê como brasileira, tenta construir relações de pertencimento com a Europa ou com os Estados Unidos. Existe uma ignorância muito grande por parte do Brasil, e mesmo na Amazônia, sobre o que é a Amazônia. Quase toda vez que o Estado brasileiro pensa em fazer alguma coisa com a Amazônia, ele reproduz uma relação de colonialismo interno — mão-de-obra escrava indígena, na época da colônia; a borracha; e hoje é basicamente minério e energia. Ela também é usada para resolver problemas internos, como a tensão agrária na ditadura. É sempre pensado de fora para dentro e esses dados arqueológicos mostram que na verdade existia um conhecimento. Análises de vestígios em laboratório mostram que já consumiam mandioca, por exemplo. Mas mais de 90% do que achamos nem sabemos porque perdemos a referência. Parte disso porque as populações indígenas sofrem um processo demográfico de depopulação muito forte desde o século 16 e também porque ninguém nunca se preocupou em olhar para esse tipo de coisa nas pesquisa etnográficas de campo. O que me deixa aflito é que as populações indígenas estão sofrendo ainda mais com a pandemia e a Amazônia está sendo destruída. A gente perdeu 20% da Amazônia nos últimos 40 anos. E do que a gente perdeu, só 15% têm algum tipo de uso produtivo — 85% a gente jogou fora.

G |Por que é tão difícil promover a ideia de separação de crescimento econômico e desmatamento na Amazônia?

EGN | Agora falo menos como arqueólogo e mais como cidadão que anda em Rondônia, no Acre, onde está a Vila do V, ocupada por uma segunda geração de pessoas, num projeto de colonização apoiado pelo poder público. Esses caras chegam ali, desmatam, começam a plantar uma coisa meio de policultura, pequena propriedade, mas têm uma série de problemas, distância, logística difícil e desistem. Daí essas terras são vendidas e começam a se formar latifúndios na região. Mas não imagine plutocratas, é um processo muito local, feito com alianças e apoios da região. E aí eles se elegem deputados e acabam tendo efeito na política nacional, fazem vista grossa para o desmatamento. Em Rondônia tem aquele pasto velho com uma cabeça de gado aqui e outra ali, mas começa a chegar uma pecuária de corte mais sofisticada, o café em algumas partes. No Acre, estão plantando agora a soja e o milho, porque está conectado ao Peru pela rodovia do Pacífico e o solo é muito bom. É uma coisa muito local, um cara que está ali na ponta, que derruba e vai grilando, e que eventualmente leva ao processo de concentração fundiária. É batido mas é falta de vontade política, porque esse tipo de padrão de exploração da terra vira apoio político. O desmatamento despencou no governo Lula. O Banco do Brasil foi lá e só deu crédito rural para quem estava com situação fundiária em ordem. Não é difícil controlar desmatamento, é você apertar na hora da grana. Se há controle do financiamento das propriedades associado a um cadastro, isso já dá uma bela enxugada. O Brasil sabe o que fazer para conter o desmatamento, é o que já fez com sucesso anteriormente. Só que por questões políticas, e agora com o Bolsonaro que vê a Amazônia para ser arrebentada, isso não acontece.

G |E dá para retroceder? Tem algum jeito de resolver o que já se perdeu?

EGN | Com Bolsonaro vai ser muito difícil, com o Ricardo Sales de ministro, e mesmo o [vice-presidente Hamilton] Mourão, a gente tem que fazer muita pressão. Tem uma parte do PIB brasileiro que está vendo isso acontecer e está preocupado, pela cidadania e também porque sabe que isso é ruim para os negócios. O Brasil foi alvo de um boicote à carne, a própria [ministra da Agricultura] Tereza Cristina já falou que o agronegócio brasileiro não precisa da Amazônia para continuar. São os embates do governo Bolsonaro: tem um lado fundamentalista fanático e tem o lado que é do capitalismo. Por enquanto, o fundamentalismo está ganhando, até porque tem apoio dos caras que estão na ponta.

G |Por que essa corrente que diz que dá para ganhar dinheiro e preservar não ganha a briga?

EGN | Quem vive lá está muito associado com o bolsonarismo, porque o Bolsonaro tem esse discurso moralista, de combate à violência. Essas são regiões muito violentas, tem muito conflito com pequenos proprietários, com indígenas. E o Bolsonaro também atende muito essa ideia, que é forte aqui no Brasil, do pioneiro. Rondônia se vê como estado de pioneiros, quem são os pioneiros? São os caras que vieram nos anos 1970. Os índios, os negros que trabalharam na Madeira Mamoré, nada disso conta. O cara da fronteira, que vai lá e faz sozinho, apesar do Estado, vê o Bolsonaro com o mesmo discurso e se identifica muito fortemente.

G |Pensando na sua pesquisa, de que a floresta foi uma plantação dos povos indígenas, dá para refazê-la?

EGN | Seria maravilhoso, mas os custos são altíssimos e demora muito. O que a gente tem que fazer é parar o desmatamento e ver o que acontece. O arco do desmatamento, que é a área desde o Pará, que passa pelo norte de Mato Grosso, Rondônia, Acre e Amazonas, mostra que está sendo controlado nas unidades de conservação e nas terras indígenas. No mundo ideal, o que eu faria, se tivesse esse poder: pararia o desmatamento e olharia para os indígenas, veria como eles manejam. Eu adoro Arqueologia, é importante para esse debate, mas os índios estão fazendo isso até hoje. É mais uma vez alguém vindo de fora, um cientista e carteirando e dizendo “não, eu sei o que a gente vai fazer”. Eu quero participar dessa conversa, acho que posso, mas quem está fazendo isso agora são os índios no Xingu, em Rondônia, em toda a Amazônia certamente e também nas cidades amazônicas, na periferias, as suas roças.

G |Mas considerando que a nossa política não colabora, o que pode ter impacto real, positivo na Amazônia sobre essa grande questão do desmatamento? Pressão internacional?

EGN | Acho que a gente tem que fazer pressão também, mas só com um grande boicote internacional, infelizmente. É quase humilhante para nós: aqui no Brasil, a gente tem produção científica maravilhosa, cientistas de alto nível trabalhando em todas as áreas aqui, mas só pressão internacional vai conseguir talvez causar algum efeito que reverta esse quadro.

G |A antropóloga Aparecida Vilaça fala que a morte nos povos indígenas é como ter uma biblioteca em chamas. O que se perde com a dizimação desses povos?

EGN | Tem uma questão de direitos humanos, a gente vê seres humanos morrerem dessa maneira, desassistidos, é uma coisa horrorosa. Um outro aspecto é que são maneiras de olhar para o mundo e para a natureza amazônica que é tão complexa e tão sofisticada, que resultam de experiências acumuladas em milhares de anos. Se olharmos para o caso das línguas indígenas, a região amazônica é uma das regiões do planeta com maior diversidade, mais de 300 são faladas na grande Amazônia, não só na brasileira. E cada língua dessas é um registro do mundo, um jeito de representar a realidade. Algumas dessas línguas tem hoje três, quatro, cinco falantes, são tecnicamente línguas mortas. Estamos vivendo numa época de extinções, de animais, de mamíferos, da fauna. Agora, a gente vê em duas gerações, em 40 anos, línguas que era dinâmicas desaparecerem com ataques e massacres a populações indígenas. Ser testemunha disso é uma tragédia para a nossa geração. O Estado brasileiro é responsável por isso e tem que assumir essa responsabilidade O Gilmar Mendes falou em genocídio, nunca achei que fosse concordar com Gilmar Mendes, mas concordo.

G |Temos influência indígena na nossa cultural, na linguagem, na alimentação (a alta gastronomia vem celebrando isso) e ainda assim parece que há uma dificuldade de reconhecer essa herança e o valor dessa cultura. Por que isso acontece?

EGN | Primeiro tem a ver com racismo, somos um país que quer se embranquecer. Queremos esconder os índios e pretos, que constituem a matriz demográfica do Brasil. E há um outro tipo de racismo, o ambiental, ao não aceitar o fato de que nós somos um país tropical. Quando neva em São Joaquim, Campos do Jordão, finge-se que está na Suíça, algo que se reflete na arquitetura, uma coisa brega. Se existe uma lição que se pode trazer da Arqueologia é que ao longo de milhares de anos, na Amazônia, há uma história de ocupação que gera mais agrobiodiversidade, e que não é incompatível com a ocupação bem sucedida das áreas de floresta. O que acontece na Amazônia é claramente é um resultado da dificuldade de se identificar e se ver como um país tropical, a gente olha para aquele ambiente super biodiverso e destrói, porque não sabe manejar a abundância e a diversidade. A questão não é olhar para o passado e viver como os índios viviam há 6 mil anos, mas é perceber que existem modos de vida. Levamos 12 mil anos para formar essa Amazônia e em 40 anos acabamos com 20% dela sem gerar riqueza. E onde está a raiz disso? Está neste racismo na raiz da sociedade brasileira.

G |Então a mensagem que podemos tirar da pesquisa arqueológica que você faz e que pode ajudar a Amazônia hoje é lembrar que ela foi formada por gente e que não precisa destruí-la para viver ali?

EGN | Exatamente. Ela foi feita por gente numa escala totalmente diferente, com um jeito diferente de ocupar. Construímos falsos dilemas que atrapalham muito. Não tem que existir um conflito entre a conservação e a ocupação humana. É claro que essa ocupação tem que ser muito bem pensada. Um exemplo é o da BR 319, que conecta Porto Velho a Manaus, aberta nos anos 70, e abandonada nos 80 por pressão dos barqueiros. Foi coberta pela floresta e está sendo reaberta agora, meio na moita. As rodovias são vetor de destruição das florestas na África, na Malásia e na Indonésia e aqui no Brasil também. A abertura dessa estrada vai cortar a Amazônia ao meio e ligar Porto Velho a Manaus. O impacto que isso pode gerar nas bacias dos rios Madeira e Purus é imenso, desmatamento. Ao mesmo tempo, Manaus, uma cidade de 2 milhões de habitantes, não pode ficar isolada. De lá, a Venezuela é único lugar que dá para ir de carro, não se pode privar que a cidade se conecte com o resto do Brasil. Será que a gente não consegue pensar num jeito de abrir essa estrada? Tem outra estrada lá no Amazonas que é a BR 174, que vai de Manaus a Boa Vista, que atravessa uma terra indígena Waimiri-Atroari, e todo dia às 18h eles fecham duas cancelas e ninguém passa. E não teve desmatamento até hoje ali. Será que a gente não consegue reabrir essa outra estrada e botar o Exército, por exemplo, para cuidar dela? No final, cria-se um espantalho, o ambientalismo, que é contra o progresso, Manaus, o desenvolvimento, que alimenta um discurso pela abertura de qualquer jeito dessa estrada. Ela vai ser aberta e as consequências podem ser horrorosas.

G |Por fim, uma pergunta mais de cunho pessoal: estudar o passado da Amazônia e ver o que está acontecendo hoje a ela dá algum desespero para você?

EGN | Na arqueologia, a nossa escala de tempo não é em anos ou em décadas ou mesmo em séculos — ela é em milênios. O Ailton Krenak fala muito bem sobre isso, que na verdade o mundo já acabou, está acabando há 500 anos. Quem trabalha na Amazônia sabe disso claramente: o impacto da conquista europeia foi uma coisa monstruosa. Já houve outros episódios ou processos horrorosos que aconteceram antes e a Amazônia está aí e os povos indígenas estão aí. O que está acontecendo agora é muito grave, talvez seja a mais grave desde o século 16. Tem muita gente que se preocupa, que vive na Amazônia e que está lutando por ela. É uma situação superpreocupante, dá um certo desespero, mas a história da humanidade é cheia de catástrofes, cheia de colapsos. A profundidade histórica milenar mostra que dá para sair dessa.

Djamila Ribeiro: Salta na biografia de Claudia Andujar o seu compromisso com povos ameaçados (Folha de S.Paulo)

www1.folha.uol.com.br

Djamila Ribeiro, 27 de agosto de 2020

Recebi de presente de um querido amigo o livro “A Luta Yanomami”, de Claudia Andujar (editado pelo Instituto Moreira Salles, org. Thyago Nogueira).

Andujar dedicou parte considerável de sua vida a fotografar o povo indígena na fronteira entre Brasil e Venezuela, no extremo norte da Amazônia. Além do talento, que refletiu a tradição, a comunidade, a espiritualidade, as dores e perdas pela integração forçada por projetos de colonização da região implementados pelo regime militar, passando por suas próprias incursões experimentais na fotografia, salta na biografia da fotógrafa o seu compromisso com os direitos dos povos constantemente ameaçados e atacados pelos interesses predatórios do garimpo nas jazidas minerais da área, pelas doenças ocidentais e pelos governos.

Fabio Cypriano, estudioso da obra de Andujar, analisa no artigo “Quando o museu se torna um canal de informação” que a exposição “‘Luta Yanomami’ foi vista no início de um governo que se caracteriza por perseguir a causa indígena, ocupando um espaço nobre na avenida Paulista em defesa dessa causa urgente, o que foi, afinal, sempre o objetivo de Andujar”.

O livro, com fotos colhidas durante uma vida, que neste ano completou 89 anos, tem valor cultural inestimável e me aproximou dos ianomâmis, a quem peço licença para fazer uma ligeira visita pelas imagens.

Ao visitar, peço a bênção de Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, xamã, porta-voz e escritor, junto ao antropólogo Bruce Albert, da obra monumental “A Queda do Céu”, livro que narra a vida de Kopenawa até se tornar líder ianomâmi, fazendo dessa trajetória uma incursão na espiritualidade, na visão de mundo e de conceitos a partir da matriz de seu povo, bem como a denúncia de todos os graves ataques do garimpo na região.

É uma obra rara em um país que costuma apagar tais saberes do debate público. Ao explicar a origem de seu nome, Kopenawa, este de origem guerreira presenteado a ele pelos espíritos xapiri “em razão da fúria que havia em mim para enfrentar os brancos”, explica um pouco de seu povo.

“Primeiro foi Davi, o nome que os brancos me atribuíram na infância, depois foi Kopenawa, o que me deram mais tarde os espíritos vespa. E por fim acrescentei Yanomami, que é palavra sólida que não pode desaparecer, pois é o nome do meu povo. Eu não nasci numa terra sem árvores. Minha carne não vem do esperma de um branco. Sou filho dos habitantes das terras altas da floresta e caí no solo da vagina de uma mulher yanomami. Sou filho da gente à qual Omama deu a existência no primeiro tempo. Nasci nesta floresta e sempre vivi nela. Hoje, meus filhos e netos, por sua vez, nela crescem. Por isso meus dizeres são os de um verdadeiro yanomami.”

As palavras de Kopenawa ecoam pelo mundo. Em março, ele esteve na ONU para denunciar avanços contra os índios. O xamã denunciou o garimpo predatório sob a chancela do governo, eleito sob um discurso de ódio contra as populações originais desse país: “Essas são as palavras daquele que se faz de grande homem no Brasil e se diz presidente da República. É o que ele verdadeiramente diz: ‘Eu sou o dono dessa floresta, desses rios, desse subsolo, dos minérios, do ouro e das pedras preciosas! Tudo isso me pertence, então, vão lá buscar tudo e trazer para a cidade. Faremos tudo virar mercadoria!’. É o que os brancos acham e é com essas palavras que destroem a floresta, desde sempre. Mas, hoje, estão acabando com o pouco que resta. Eles já destruíram as nossas trilhas, sujaram os rios, envenenaram os peixes, queimaram as árvores e os animais que caçamos. Eles nos matam também com as suas epidemias”.

As palavras de Kopenawa, ditas antes da eclosão da pandemia no Brasil, ganharam contornos ainda mais sombrios. Desde 2019, o país vinha apresentando retrocessos desastrosos na preservação de terras indígenas. Segundo relatório do Instituto Socioambiental, a derrubada da floresta nas terras ianomâmi cresceu 113% no último ano, sendo que o aumento foi de 80% nas terras indígenas.

No cenário de pandemia, a situação é trágica. Somado ao desmonte em órgãos de proteção indígena, a subnotificação dos números de indígenas mortos pelo Ministério da Saúde, bem como o demorado e insuficiente plano para prevenção de contágio em comunidades indígenas e quilombolas com vetos que vão da obrigação do governo em fornecer água potável até a facilitação ao acesso ao auxílio emergencial, o governo segue com seu projeto de genocídio da população e deve ser responsabilizado, na pessoa do presidente, no Tribunal Penal Internacional, no qual está denunciado. Havendo justiça, assim será.

Indigenous best Amazon stewards, but only when property rights assured: Study (Mongabay)

by Sue Branford on 17 August 2020

  • New research provides statistical evidence confirming the claim by Indigenous peoples that that they are the more effective Amazon forest guardians in Brazil — but only if and when full property rights over their territories are recognized, and fully protected, by civil authorities in a process called homologation.
  • Researchers looked at 245 Indigenous territories, homologated between 1982 and 2016. They concluded that Indigenous people were only able to curb deforestation effectively within their ancestral territories after homologation had been completed, endowing full property rights.
  • However, since the study was completed, the Temer and Bolsonaro governments have backpedaled on Indigenous land rights, failing to protect homologated reserves. Also, the homologation process has come to a standstill, failing its legal responsibility to recognize collective ownership pledged by Brazil’s Constitution.
  • In another study, researchers suggest that a key to saving the Amazon involves reframing our view of it, giving up the old view of it as an untrammeled Eden assaulted by modern exploitation, and instead seeing it as a forest long influenced by humanity; now we need only restore balance to achieve sustainability.
An Indigenous woman weaving anklets on her son. A clash of cultures in the Amazon threatens Indigenous lands and the rainforest. Image by Antônio Carlos Moura, s/d.

“The xapiri [shamanic spirits] have defended the forest since it first came into being. Our ancestors have never devastated it because they kept the spirits by their side,” declares Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, who belongs to the 27,000-strong Yanomami people living in the very north of Brazil.

He is expressing a commonly held Indigenous belief that they — the original peoples on the land, unlike the “white” Amazon invaders — are the ones most profoundly committed to forest protection. The Yanomami shaman reveals the reason: “We know well that without trees nothing will grow on the hardened and blazing ground.”

Now Brazil’s Indigenous people have gained scientific backing for their strongly held belief from two American academics.

In a study published this month in the PNAS journal, entitled Collective property rights reduce deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, two political scientists, Kathryn Baragwanath, from the University of California San Diego, and Ella Bayi, at the Department of Political Science, Columbia University, provide statistical proof of the Indigenous claim that they are the more effective forest guardians.

In their study, the researchers use comprehensive statistical data to show that Indigenous populations can effectively curb deforestation — but only if and when their full property rights over their territories are recognized by civil authorities in a process called homologação in Portuguese, or homologation in English.

A Tapirapé man and child. Image courtesy of ISA.

Full property rights key to curbing deforestation

The scientists reached their conclusions by examining data on 245 Indigenous reserves homologated between 1982 and 2016. By examining the step-by-step legal establishment of Indigenous reserves, they were able to precisely date the moment of homologation for each territory, and to assess the effectiveness of Indigenous action against deforestation before and after full property rights were recognized.

Brazilian law requires the completion of a complex four-stage process before full recognition. After examining the data, Baragwanath and Bayi concluded that Indigenous people were only able to curb deforestation within their ancestral territories effectively after the last phase ­— homologation — had been completed.

Most deforestation of Indigenous territories occurs at the borders, as land-grabbers, loggers and farmers invade. But the new study shows that, once full property rights are recognized, Indigenous people were historically able to reduce deforestation at those borders from around 3% to 1% — a reduction of 66% which the authors find to be “a very strong finding.”

However, they emphasize that this plunge in deforestation rate only comes after homologation is complete. Baragwanath told Mongabay: The positive “effect on deforestation is very small before homologation and zero for non-homologated territories.” The authors concluded: “We believe the final stage [is] the one that makes the difference, since it is when actual property rights are granted, no more contestation can happen, and enforcement is undertaken by the government agencies.”

Homologation is crucially important, say the researchers, because with it the Indigenous group gains the backing of law and of the Brazilian state. They note: “Without homologation, Indigenous territories do not have the legal rights needed to protect their territories, their territorial resources are not considered their own, and the government is not constitutionally responsible for protecting them from encroachment, invasion, and external use of their resources.”

They continue: “Once homologated, a territory becomes the permanent possession of its Indigenous peoples, no third party can contest its existence, and extractive activities carried out by external actors can only occur after consulting the [Indigenous] communities and the National Congress.”

The scientists offer proof of effective state action and protections after homologation: “For example, FUNAI partnered with IBAMA and the military police of Mato Grosso in May 2019 to combat illegal deforestation on the homologated territory of Urubu Branco. In this operation, 12 people were charged with federal theft of wood and fined R $90,000 [US $23,000], and multiple trucks and tractors were seized; the wood seized was then donated to the municipality.”

A Tapirapé woman at work. Image courtesy of ISA.

Temer and Bolsonaro tip the tables

However, under the Jair Bolsonaro government, which came to power in Brazil after the authors collected their data, the situation is changing.

Before Bolsonaro, the number of homologations varied greatly from year to year, apparently in random fashion. A highpoint was reached in 1991, when over 70 territories were homologated, well over twice the number in any other year. This may have been because Brazil was about to host the 1992 Earth Summit and the Collor de Mello government was keen to boost Brazil’s environmental credentials. The surge may have also occurred as a result of momentum gained from Brazil’s adoption of its progressive 1988 constitution, with its enshrined Indigenous rights.

Despite wild oscillations in the annual number of homologations, until recently progress happened under each administration. “Every President signed over [Indigenous] property rights during their tenure, regardless of party or ideology,” the study states.

But since Michel Temer became president at the end of August 2016, the process has come to a standstill, with no new homologations. Baragwanath and Bayi suggest that, by refusing to recognize the full property rights of more Indigenous peoples, the Temer and Bolsonaro administrations “could be responsible for an extra 1.5 million hectares [5,790 square miles] of deforestation per year.” That would help explain soaring deforestation rates detected by INPE, Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research in recent years.

Clearly, for homologation to be effective, the state must assume its legal responsibilities, says Survival International’s Fiona Watson, who notes that this is certainly not happening under Bolsonaro: “Recognizing Indigenous peoples’ collective landownership rights is a fundamental legal requirement and ethical imperative, but it is not enough on its own. Land rights need to be vigorously enforced, which requires political will and action, proper funding, and stamping out corruption. Far from applying the law, President Bolsonaro and his government have taken a sledgehammer to Indigenous peoples’ hard-won constitutional rights, watered down environmental safeguards, and are brutally dismantling the agencies charged with protecting tribal peoples and the environment.”

Watson continues: “Brazil’s tribes — some only numbering a few hundred living in remote areas — are pitted against armed criminal gangs, whipped up by Bolsonaro’s hate speech. As if this wasn’t enough, COVID-19 is killing the best guardians of the forest, especially the older generations with expertise in forest management. Lethal diseases like malaria are on the rise in Indigenous communities and Amazon fires are spreading.”

In fact, Bolsonaro uses the low number of Indigenous people inhabiting reserves today — low populations often the outcome of past horrific violence and even genocide — as an excuse for depriving them of their lands. In 2015 he declared: “The Indians do not speak our language, they do not have money, they do not have culture. They are native peoples. How did they manage to get 13% of the national territory?” And in 2017 he said: “Not a centimeter will be demarcated… as an Indigenous reserve.”

The Indigenous territory of Urubu Branco, cited by Baragwanath and Bayi as a stellar example of effective state action, is a case in point. Under the Bolsonaro government it has been invaded time and again. Although the authorities have belatedly taken action, the Apyãwa (Tapirapé) Indigenous group living there says that invaders are now using the chaos caused by the pandemic to carry out more incursions. https://www.youtube.com/embed/VEqoNo3O8Jg

Land rights: a path to conserving Amazonia

Even so, say the experts, it still seems likely that, if homologation was implemented properly now or in the future, with effective state support, it would lead to reduced deforestation. Indeed, Baragwanath and Bayi suggest that this may be one of the few ways of saving the Amazon forest.

“Providing full property rights and the institutional environment for enforcing these rights is an important and cost-effective way for countries to protect their forests and attain their climate goals,” says the study. “Public policy, international mobilization, and nongovernmental organizations should now focus their efforts on pressuring the Brazilian government to register Indigenous territories still awaiting their full property rights.”

But, in the current state of accelerating deforestation, unhampered by state regulation or enforcement, other approaches may be required. One way forward is suggested in a document optimistically entitled: “Reframing the Wilderness Concept can Bolster Collaborative Conservation.”

In the paper, Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares from the Helsinki Institute of Sustainable Science, and others suggest that it is time for a new concept of “wilderness.”

For decades, many conservationists argued that the Amazon’s wealth of biodiversity stems from it being a “pristine” biome, “devoid of the destructive impacts of human activity.” But increasingly studies have shown that Indigenous people greatly contributed to the exuberance of the forest by domesticating plants as much as 10,000 years ago. Thus, the forest and humanity likely evolved together.

In keeping with this productive partnership, conservationists and Indigenous peoples need to work in harmony with forest ecology, say the authors. This organic partnership is more urgently needed than ever, they say, because the entire Amazon basin is facing an onslaught, “a new wave of frontier expansion” by logging, industrial mining, and agribusiness.

Fernández-Llamazares told Mongabay: “Extractivist interests and infrastructure development across much of the Amazon are not only driving substantial degradation of wilderness areas and their unique biodiversity, but also forcing the region’s Indigenous peoples on the frontlines of ever more pervasive social-ecological conflict.…  From 2014 to 2019, at least 475 environmental and land defenders have been killed in Amazonian countries, including numerous members of Indigenous communities.”

Fernández-Llamazares believes that new patterns of collaboration are emerging.

“A good example of the alliance between Indigenous Peoples and wilderness defenders can be found in the Isiboro-Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory (TIPNIS, being its Spanish acronym), in the Bolivian Amazon,” he says. “TIPNIS is the ancestral homeland of four lowland Indigenous groups and one of Bolivia’s most iconic protected areas, largely considered as one of the last wildlands in the country. In 2011, conservationists and Indigenous communities joined forces to oppose the construction of a road that would cut across the heart of the area.” A victory they won at the time, though TIPNIS today remains under contention today.

Eduardo S. Brondizio, another study contributor, points out alternatives to the industrial agribusiness and mining model: numerous management systems established by small-scale farmers, for example, that are helping conserve entire ecosystems.

“The açaí fruit economy, for instance, is arguably the region’s largest [Amazon] economy today, even compared to soy and cattle, and yet it occupies a fraction of the [land] area occupied by soy and cattle, with far higher economic return and employment than deforestation-based crops, while maintaining forest cover and multiple ecological benefits.” he said.

And, he adds, it is a completely self-driven initiative. “The entire açaí fruit economy emerged from the hands and knowledge of local riverine producers who [have] responded to market demand since the 1980s by intensifying their production using local agroforestry knowledge.” It is important, he stresses, that conservationists recognize the value of these sustainable economic activities in protecting the forest.

The new alliance taking shape between conservationists and Indigenous peoples is comparable with the new forms of collaboration that have arisen among traditional people in the Brazilian Amazon. Although Indigenous populations and riverine communities of subsistence farmers and Brazil nut collectors have long regarded each other as enemies — fighting to control the same territory — they are increasingly working together to confront land-grabbers, loggers and agribusiness.

Still, there is no doubt time is running out. Brazil’s huge swaths of agricultural land are already contributing to, and suffering from, deepening drought, because the “flying rivers” that bring down rainfall from the Amazon are beginning to collapse. Scientists are warning that the forest is moving toward a precipitation tipping point, when drought, deforestation and fire will change large areas of rainforest into arid degraded savanna.

This may already be happening. The Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM), a non-profit, research organisation, warned recently that the burning season, now just beginning in the Amazon, could devastate an even larger area than last year, when video footage of uncontrolled fires ablaze in the Amazon was viewed around the world. IPAM estimates that a huge area, covering 4,509 square kilometers (1,741 square miles), has been felled and is waiting to go up in flames this year — data some experts dispute. But as of last week, more than 260 major fires were already alight in the Amazon.

Years ago Davi Kopenawa Yanomami warned: “They [the white people] continue to maltreat the earth everywhere they go.… It never occurs to them that if they mistreat it too much it will finally turn to chaos.… The xapiri [the shamanic spirits] try hard to defend the white people the same way as they defend us.… But if Omoari, the dry season being, settles on their land for good, they will only have trickles of dirty water to drink and they will die of thirst. This could truly happen to them.”

Citations:

Kathryn Baragwanath and Ella Bayi, (10 August 2020), Collective property rights reduce deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, Julien Terraube, Michael C. Gavin, Aili Pyhälä, Sacha M.O. Siani, Mar Cabeza, and Eduardo S. Brondizio, (29 July 2020) Reframing the Wilderness Concept can Bolster Collaborative Conservation, Trends in Ecology and Evolution.

Banner image: Young Tapirajé women. Image by Agência Brasil.

Scientists launch ambitious conservation project to save the Amazon (Mongabay)

Series: Amazon Conservation

by Shanna Hanbury on 27 July 2020

  • The Science Panel for the Amazon (SPA), an ambitious cooperative project to bring together the existing scientific research on the Amazon biome, has been launched with the support of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Solutions Network.
  • Modeled on the authoritative UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports, the first Amazon report is planned for release in April 2021; that report will include an extensive section on Amazon conservation solutions and policy suggestions backed up by research findings.
  • The Science Panel for the Amazon consists of 150 experts — including climate, ecological, and social scientists; economists; indigenous leaders and political strategists — primarily from the Amazon countries
  • According to Carlos Nobre, one of the leading scientists on the project, the SPA’s reports will aim not only to curb deforestation, but to propose an ongoing economically feasible program to conserve the forest while advancing human development goals for the region, working in tandem with, and in support of, ecological systems.
Butterflies burst into the sky above an Amazonian river. Image © Fernando Lessa / The Nature Conservancy.

With the Amazon rainforest predicted to be at, or very close to, its disastrous rainforest-to-savanna tipping point, deforestation escalating at a frightening pace, and governments often worsening the problem, the need for action to secure the future of the rainforest has never been more urgent.

Now, a group of 150 leading scientific and economic experts on the Amazon basin have taken it upon themselves to launch an ambitious conservation project. The newly founded Science Panel for the Amazon (SPA) aims to consolidate scientific research on the Amazon and propose solutions that will secure the region’s future — including the social and economic well-being of its thirty-five-million inhabitants.

“Never before has there been such a rigorous scientific evaluation on the Amazon,” said Carlos Nobre, the leading Amazon climatologist and one of the chairs of the Scientific Panel. The newly organized SPA, he adds, will model its work on the style of the authoritative reports produced by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in terms of academic diligence and the depth and breadth of analysis and recommendations.

The Amazon Panel, is funded by the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Solutions Network and supported by prominent political leaders, such as former Colombian President, Juan Manuel Santos and the elected leader of the Coordinator of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon River Basin, José Gregorio Díaz Mirabal. The SPA plans to publish its first report by April 2021.

Timber illegally logged within an indigenous reserve seized by IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, before the election of Jair Bolsonaro. Under the Bolsonaro administration, IBAMA has been largely defunded. Image courtesy of IBAMA.

Reversing the Amazon Tipping Point

Over the last five decades, the Amazon rainforest lost almost a fifth of its forest cover, putting the biome on the edge of a dangerous cliff. Studies show that if 3 to 8% more forest cover is lost, then deforestation combined with escalating climate change is likely to cause the Amazon ecosystem to collapse.

After this point is reached, the lush, biodiverse rainforest will receive too little precipitation to maintain itself and quickly shift from forest into a degraded savanna, causing enormous economic damage across the South American continent, and releasing vast amounts of forest-stored carbon to the atmosphere, further destabilizing the global climate.

Amazon researchers are now taking a proactive stance to prevent the Amazon Tipping Point: “Our message to political leaders is that there is no time to waste,” Nobre wrote in the SPA’s press release.

Amid escalating forest loss in the Amazon, propelled by the anti-environmentalist agenda of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, experts fear that this year’s burning season, already underway, may exceed the August 2019 wildfires that shocked the world. Most Amazon basin fires are not natural in cause, but intentionally set, often by land grabbers invading indigenous territories and other conserved lands, and causing massive deforestation.

“We are burning our own money, resources and biodiversity — it makes no sense,” Sandra Hacon told Mongabay; she is a prominent biologist at the Brazilian biomedical Oswaldo Cruz Foundation and has studied the effects of Amazon forest fires on health. It is expected that air pollution caused by this year’s wildfire’s, when combined with COVID-19 symptoms, will cause severe respiratory impacts across the region.

Bolivian ecologist Marielos Penã-Claros, notes the far-reaching economic importance of the rainforest: “The deforestation of the Amazon also has a negative effect on the agricultural production of Uruguay or Paraguay, thousands of kilometers away.”

The climate tipping point, should it be passed, would negatively effect every major stakeholder in the Amazon, likely wrecking the agribusiness and energy production sectors — ironically, the sectors responsible for much of the devastation today.

“I hope to show evidence to the world of what is happening with land use in the Amazon and alert other governments, as well as state and municipal-level leadership. We have a big challenge ahead, but it’s completely necessary,” said Hacon.

Cattle ranching is the leading cause of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, but researchers say there is enough already degraded land there to support significant cattle expansion without causing further deforestation. The SPA may in its report suggest viable policies for curbing cattle-caused deforestation. Image ©Henrique Manreza / The Nature Conservancy.

Scientists offer evidence, and also solutions

Creating a workable blueprint for the sustainable future of the Amazon rainforest is no simple task. The solutions mapped out, according to the Amazon Panel’s scientists, will seek to not only prevent deforestation and curb global climate change, but to generate a new vision and action plan for the Amazon region and its residents — especially, fulfilling development goals via a sustainable standing-forest economy.

The SPA, Nobre says, will make a critical break with the purely technical approach of the United Nation’s IPCC, which banned policy prescriptions entirely from its reports. In practice, this has meant that while contributing scientists can show the impacts of fossil fuels on the atmosphere, they cannot recommend ending oil subsidies, for example. “We inverted this logic, and the third part of the [SPA] report will be entirely dedicated to searching for policy suggestions,” Nobre says. “We need the forest on its feet, the empowerment of the traditional peoples and solutions on how to reach development goals.”

Researchers across many academic fields (ranging from climate science and economics to history and meteorology) are collaborating on the SPA Panel, raising hopes that scientific consensus on the Amazon rainforest can be reached, and that conditions for research cooperation will greatly improve.

Indigenous Munduruku dancers in the Brazilian Amazon. The SPA intends to gather Amazon science and formulate socio-economic solutions in order to make sound recommendations to policymakers. Image by Mauricio Torres / Mongabay.

SPA participants hope that a thorough scientific analysis of the rainforest’s past, present and future will aid in the formulation of viable public policies designed to preserve the Amazon biome — hopefully leading to scientifically and economically informed political decisions by the governments of Amazonian nations.

“We are analyzing not only climate but biodiversity, human aspects and preservation beyond the climate issues,” Paulo Artaxo, an atmospheric physicist at the University of São Paulo, told Mongabay.

Due to the urgency of the COVID-19 pandemic, the initiative’s initial dates for a final report were pushed forward by several months, and a conference in China cancelled entirely. But the 150-strong team is vigorously pushing forward, and the first phase of the project — not publicly available — is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

The hope on the horizon is that a unified voice from the scientific community will trigger long-lasting positive changes in the Amazon rainforest. “More than ever, we need to hear the voices of the scientists to enable us to understand how to save the Amazon from wanton and unthinking destruction,” said Jeffrey Sachs, the director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, on the official launch website called The Amazon We Want.

Banner image: Aerial photo of an Amazon tributary surrounded by rainforest. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.

Innovation by ancient farmers adds to biodiversity of the Amazon (Science Daily)

Date: June 18, 2020

Source: University of Exeter

Summary: Innovation by ancient farmers to improve soil fertility continues to have an impact on the biodiversity of the Amazon, a major new study shows.

Innovation by ancient farmers to improve soil fertility continues to have an impact on the biodiversity of the Amazon, a major new study shows.

Early inhabitants fertilized the soil with charcoal from fire remains and food waste. Areas with this “dark earth” have a different set of species than the surrounding landscape, contributing to a more diverse ecosystem with a richer collection of plant species, researchers from the State University of Mato Grosso in Brazil and the University of Exeter have found.

The legacy of this land management thousands of years ago means there are thousands of these patches of dark earth dotted around the region, most around the size of a small field. This is the first study to measure the difference in vegetation in dark and non-dark earth areas in mature forests across a region spanning a thousand kilometers.

The team of ecologists and archaeologists studied abandoned areas along the main stem of the Amazon River near Tapajós and in the headwaters of the Xingu River Basin in southern Amazonia.

Lead author Dr Edmar Almeida de Oliveira said: “This is an area where dark earth lush forests grow, with colossal trees of different species from the surrounding forest, with more edible fruit trees, such as taperebá and jatobá.”

The number of indigenous communities living in the Amazon collapsed following European colonization of the region, meaning many dark earth areas were abandoned.

The study, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, reveals for the first time the extent to which pre-Columbian Amerindians influenced the current structure and diversity of the Amazon forest of the areas they once farmed.

Researchers sampled around 4,000 trees in southern and eastern Amazonia. Areas with dark earth had a significantly higher pH and more nutrients that improved soil fertility. Pottery shards and other artefacts were also found in the rich dark soils.

Professor Ben Hur Marimon Junior, from the State University of Mato Grosso, said: “Pre-Columbian indigenous people, who fertilized the poor soils of the Amazon for at least 5,000 years, have left an impressive legacy, creating the dark earth, or Terras Pretas de Índio”

Professor José Iriarte, an archaeologist from the University of Exeter, said: “By creating dark earth early inhabitants of the Amazon were able to successfully cultivate the soil for thousands of years in an agroforestry system

“We think ancient communities used dark earth areas to grow crops to eat, and adjacent forests without dark earth for agroforestry.”

Dr Ted Feldpausch, from the University of Exeter, who co-authored the study with Dr Luiz Aragão from the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) in Brazil, said: “After being abandoned for hundreds of years, we still find a fingerprint of the ancient land-use in the forests today as a legacy of the pre-Colombian Amazonian population estimated in millions of inhabitants.

“We are currently expanding this research across the whole Amazon Basin under a project funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to evaluate whether historical fire also affected the forest areas distant from the anthropogenic dark earths.”

Many areas with dark earth are currently cultivated by local and indigenous populations, who have had great success with their food crops. But most are still hidden in the native forest, contributing to increased tree size, carbon stock and regional biodiversity. For this reason, the lush forests of the “Terra Preta de Índio” and their biological and cultural wealth in the Amazon must be preserved as a legacy for future generations, the researchers have said. Areas with dark earth are under threat due to illegal deforestation and fire.

“Dark earth increases the richness of species, an important consideration for regional biodiversity conservation. These findings highlight the small-scale long-term legacy of pre-Columbian inhabitants on the soils and vegetation of Amazonia,” said co-author Prof Beatriz Marimon, from the State University of Mato Grosso.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Exeter. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Edmar Almeida Oliveira, Ben Hur Marimon‐Junior, Beatriz Schwantes Marimon, José Iriarte, Paulo S. Morandi, S. Yoshi Maezumi, Denis S. Nogueira, Luiz E. O .C. Aragão, Izaias Brasil Silva, Ted R. Feldpausch. Legacy of Amazonian Dark Earth soils on forest structure and species composition. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 2020; DOI: 10.1111/geb.13116

Para escapar do coronavírus, Yanomami se refugiam no interior da floresta (Amazônia Real)

Artigo original

Por: Ana Amélia Hamdan | 28/04/2020 às 23:41

Os indígenas chamam a pandemia de xawara. Um jovem da etnia morreu de Covid-19, em Boa Vista, Roraima.

A imagem é da Expedição Yanomami Okrapomai (Christian Braga/Midia Ninja/2014)

São Gabriel da Cachoeira (AM) – “A floresta protege porque ela tem um cheiro muito saudável, isso é a proteção que a floresta dá para nós Yanomami. A floresta tem mais proteção porque o ar não é contaminado. Muitos já foram para se proteger na floresta porque evitam de pegar gripe e outras doenças aqui na comunidade. Estão por lá se alimentando com caça, pesca, agora é muito açaí e muita fruta que está tendo na floresta”.

É assim, como se vê na fala da liderança Yanomami, José Mário Pereira Góes, que os indígenas estão se protegendo contra o coronavírus. Ele é presidente da Associação Yanomami do Rio Cauaburis e Afluentes (Ayrca), no Amazonas. Tal como os mais velhos fizeram para fugir de epidemias já enfrentadas no passado, como sarampo, gripes e coqueluche, os indígenas dessa etnia estão se refugiando no interior da floresta amazônica para se afastar do risco de contrair a Covid-19, a doença que causa uma pandemia no mundo e é responsável pela morte de um jovem da etnia.

A Terra Indígena Yanomami tem 9.664.975 hectares, localizada entre os estados do Amazonas e Roraima. São 380 comunidades e uma população de 28.148 pessoas, segundo a Secretaria Especial de Saúde Indígena, do Ministério da Saúde. A nova invasão de garimpeiros, que é um risco eminente da disseminação do novo coronavírus no território, foi denunciada pelo líder Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, em 2019.

Na comunidade Maturacá, localizada em São Gabriel da Cachoeira, no noroeste do Amazonas, pelo menos 12 famílias partiram para o interior da floresta. Outros grupos familiares se preparam para seguir o mesmo caminho. “O nosso povo Yanomami está alerta. A hora que chega em São Gabriel essa doença, vamos nos deslocar e estamos fazendo farinhada para a gente se isolar os 40 dias no mato. E a hora que tiver três casos, quatro casos, não vai ficar ninguém na comunidade. Só vai ficar pelotão, missão. Só isso que vai estar aqui na comunidade”, diz José Góes.

Assembleia para discutir turismo no Pico da Neblina, em Maturacá
(Foto: João Claudio Moreira/Amazônia Real)

Em Boa Vista, capital de Roraima, o vice-presidente da Hutukara Associação Yanomami, Dario Vitório Kopenawa explica que esse movimento de isolamento no interior da floresta amazônica não é uma tarefa fácil para os Yanomami. Muitas das comunidades se fixaram perto de locais onde há posto de saúde. É por isso que há divisão entre quem se refugiou na floresta e quem permaneceu na comunidade. “Algumas minorias foram para o isolado. A maioria ainda está na comunidade, ficando isolado na maloca”, explica.

Dario acompanha a movimentação dos Yanomami para dentro da floresta, recebendo informações via radiofonia, da sede da Hutukara, e relata que a ida para o mato vem acontecendo no Marauiá (região do Rio Marauiá); Parawa-u e Demini, todos no Amazonas. Em Roraima, é o subgrupo Ninam que segue a mesma estratégia. A família de Dario – inclusive seu pai, a liderança e xamã Yanomami Davi Kopenawa -, está na região Demini, buscando proteção na floresta.

Também via rádio, o vice-presidente da Hutukara tem notícias de que os xamãs vêm trabalhando na tentativa de conhecer a doença. “Pandemia coronavírus para nós é xawara. Os Yanomami pajés e médicos da floresta estão trabalhando reconhecendo essa doença. Assim os xamãs me falaram”, diz Dario Kopenawa. 

O isolamento em São Gabriel

Fiscais orientam população em São Gabriel da Cachoeira na terça-feira, 28 de abri
(Foto: Paulo Desana/Dabakuri/Amazônia Real)

A viagem da sede de São Gabriel da Cachoeira para Maturacá leva cerca de 10 horas, dependendo das condições da estrada e de navegação pelo Rio Negro e seus afluentes. No domingo (26), a prefeitura do município confirmou os dois primeiros casos de coronavírus e, no dia seguinte, houve a confirmação outros dois. É grande a possibilidade de já estar havendo a transmissão comunitária. Desses quatro pacientes, três são indígenas e um é militar do Exército.

José Mário Góes, presidente da Associação Yanomami do Rio Cauaburis e Afluentes (Ayrca), está em Maturacá e respondeu à reportagem da Amazônia Real por meio da mensagem de áudio de WhatsApp. O acesso à internet é possível porque durante parte do dia eles conseguem captar o sinal pela proximidade com o 5º Pelotão Especial de Fronteira do Exército.

“Quando uma família vai, outras famílias vão, a vizinhada vai. Porque na comunidade somos todos parentes, então eles levaram toda a família”, disse a liderança indígena. Cada grupo está construindo pequenos abrigos para morar por cerca de 40 dias. Além de se manterem com frutas, caça e pesca, levam alimentos. Se for necessário, voltam à comunidade para reforçar os mantimentos. “Levaram alimentos principais como farinha, banana, tapioca, beiju, e também café, açúcar, arroz, feijão e materiais de caça e pesca. E quando acaba os alimentos eles vêm buscar banana, pegar estoque de farinha”, relata Góes.

“Deixar as casas e ficar por um tempo na floresta é uma estratégia que algumas famílias já estão fazendo. Diferente de nós que estamos enfrentando pela primeira vez uma epidemia, os Yanomami têm experiências recentes que dizimaram comunidades inteiras e os sobreviventes foram os que se isolaram no mato”, explica o assessor do Programa Rio Negro do Instituto Socioambiental (ISA), Marcos Wesley de Oliveira.

Essa estratégia pode ser comparada ao isolamento social recomendado pela Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS) e pelo Ministério da Saúde, aponta Marcos Wesley. “Os Yanomami sabem que até o momento não há remédio ou vacina eficazes contra a Covid-19”, reforça.

O município de São Gabriel da Cachoeira tem uma população de mais de 45 mil habitantes, a maioria indígenas de 23 etnias, segundo a taxa atualizada do Censo do IBGE. Desse total, 25 mil moram nas aldeias e comunidades, em territórios demarcados, segundo a Federação das Organizações Indígenas do Rio Negro (Foirn). 

Para evitar que os indígenas de Maturacá, cuja população total é de cerca de 2.000 pessoas, façam a viagem até São Gabriel para fazer compras, o ISA e a Foirn enviam cestas básicas e kits de higiene para a comunidade. Esse material será levado por avião do Exército, segundo protocolo de higienização e distribuição para evitar a contaminação da Covid-19. 

Em artigo publicada na Amazônia Real, o antropólogo francês Bruce Albert citou um trecho do livro A queda do Céu, escrito em conjunto por ele e pelo xamã e líder Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, para falar sobre a morte do jovem, em Boa Vista. O adolescente foi sepultado sem o conhecimento dos pais e sem o respeito aos rituais de seu povo. Ao tratar do tema funeral, o antropólogo sugeriu ao leitor “reler A queda do Céu, pp. 267-68, onde Davi Kopenawa conta como sua mãe morreu numa epidemia de sarampo trazida pelos missionários da Novas Tribos do Brasil (aliás, Ethnos360) e como estes sepultaram o cadáver à revelia num lugar até hoje desconhecido: Por causa deles, nunca pude chorar a minha mãe como faziam nossos antigos. Isso é uma coisa muito ruim. Causou-me um sofrimento muito profundo, e a raiva desta morte fica em mim desde então. Foi endurecendo com o tempo, e só terá fim quando eu mesmo acabar. ”

Bruce Albert, que trabalha com os Yanomami desde 1975, também escreveu em sua rede social sobre a saúde do adolescente Yanomami, de 15 anos, da aldeia Helepe, no Rio Uraricoera (RR), antes dele morrer vítima da Covid-19.

O alerta das epidemias do passado

Movimento nas ruas de São Gabriel da Cachoeira na manhã de segunda-feira (27/04/2020) (Foto: Paulo Desana/Dabakuri/Amazônia Real)

A morte do adolescente Yanomami despertou o temor desse povo, inclusive em Maturacá. “Essa morte traz alerta para que isso não acabe com povo Yanomami. Como aconteceu na região do Irokae, morrendo adultos, jovens e crianças, os idosos, como aconteceu isso não queremos que aconteça mais. Por isso estamos alerta por aqui”, afirma José Mário Góes.

Irokae é o primeiro acampamento para o Pico da Neblina, denominado pelos Yanomami de Yaripo, a Montanha de Vento. Essa trilha seria reaberta para o turismo em abril, mas foi adiada devido à pandemia. Anos atrás, na tentativa de fugir da coqueluche, os grupos seguiram por esse caminho, mas alguns acabaram morrendo.

“Essa doença de agora, o coronavírus, aqui em Maturacá, representa epidemia de coqueluche como aconteceu na região de Irokae. O que está acontecendo com os napë (forasteiro, homem branco), isso já aconteceu aqui para nós Yanomami na região do Irokae, onde fica a trilha do Yaripo”, relata José Mário. “Nossos avós já tiveram outra doença, como epidemia de coqueluche, que matou muitas crianças e os mais velhos. Eles não querem que repita essa história. Morreu até um pajé nessa epidemia. Então como fizeram agora, eles foram para a floresta, na região do frio, chegaram até lá no pico. É lá que ficam os restos mortais dos nossos parentes e por isso que nós falamos que temos histórias no caminho do Yaripo”, relata José Góes.

Outro problema enfrentado no passado foi o sarampo. “Aqui na comunidade, em Maturacá, onde está situado o polo base de saúde. Então era um xapono (casa coletiva) onde tivemos epidemia de sarampo. Também nós fizemos o movimento como estamos fazendo hoje aqui, mas não teve jeito. Pessoas fugiram, mas teve óbito nas crianças. Morreu muita criança e adulto. É a mesma história que eles não querem que repita. ”

Para os Yanomami, o vírus é um tipo de envenenamento. “Nós observamos que o próprio napë faz envenenamento no ser humano para dizer que é vírus. Isso é epidemia, é um vírus que afeta qualquer ser humano e acaba com a vida do ser humano. Isso tem na nossa realidade como aconteceu com nossos antepassados o que está acontecendo hoje no mundo inteiro. Até no Brasil e no exterior”, diz José Góes.

Em busca de proteção, os Yanomami recorrem a ensinamentos de seus antepassados. Após a confirmação dos casos em São Gabriel, as lideranças tradicionais iniciaram a chamada “recura’ para que a doença saia do lugar e seja levada pelo vento para onde não tem ser humano.

Expedição Yanomami Okrapomai (Christian Braga/ Midia Ninja/2014)

*Este texto foi atualizado em 29/04/2020 às 11h27 para corrigir o número da população Yonomami.

Crops were cultivated in regions of the Amazon ‘10,000 years ago’ (BBC)

By Matt McGrath – Environment correspondent

8 April 2020

Image copyright: Umberto Lombardo; Image caption: The forest islands of this part of Bolivia seen from the air

Far from being a pristine wilderness, some regions of the Amazon have been profoundly altered by humans dating back 10,000 years, say researchers.

An international team found that during this period, crops were being cultivated in a remote location in what is now northern Bolivia.

The scientists believe that the humans who lived here were planting squash, cassava and maize.

The inhabitants also created thousands of artificial islands in the forest.

The end of the last ice age, around 12,000 years ago, saw a sustained rise in global temperatures that initiated many changes around the world.

Image copyright: Umberto Lombardo; Image caption: Images of the phytoliths found by the scientists – the scalloped sphere in the top right corner is from squash

Perhaps the most important of these was that early civilisations began to move away from living as hunter-gatherers and started to cultivate crops for food.

Researchers have previously unearthed evidence that crops were domesticated at four important locations around the world.

So China saw the cultivation of rice, while in the Middle East it was grains, in Central America and Mexico it was maize, while potatoes and quinoa emerged in the Andes.

Now scientists say that the Llanos de Moxos region of southwestern Amazonia should be seen as a fifth key region.

The area is a savannah but is dotted with raised areas of land now covered with trees.

Image copyright: Umberto Lombardo; Image caption: One of the 4,700 forest islands in this region of Amazonia

The area floods for part of the year but these “forest islands” remain above the waters.

Some 4,700 of these small mounds were developed by humans over time, in a very mundane way.

“These are just places where people dropped their rubbish, and over time they grow,” said lead author Dr Umberto Lombardo from the University of Bern, Switzerland.

“Of course, rubbish is very rich in nutrients, and as these areas grow they rise above the level of the flood during the rainy season, so they become good places to settle with fertile soil, so people come back to the same places all the time.”

The researchers examined some 30 of these islands for evidence of crop planting.

They discovered tiny fragments of silica called phytoliths, described as tiny pieces of glass that form inside the cells of plants.

The shape of these tiny glass fragments are different, depending on which plants they come from.

The researchers were able to identify evidence of manioc (cassava, yuca) that were grown 10,350 years ago. Squash appears 10,250 years ago, and maize more recently – just 6,850 years ago.

“This is quite surprising,” said Dr Lombardo.

Image copyright: Umberto Lombardo; Image caption: The scientists at work on the site

“This is Amazonia, this is one of these places that a few years ago we thought to be like a virgin forest, an untouched environment.”

“Now we’re finding this evidence that people were living there 10,500 years ago, and they started practising cultivation.”

The people who lived at this time probably also survived on sweet potato and peanuts, as well as fish and large herbivores.

The researchers say it’s likely that the humans who lived here may have brought their plants with them.

They believe their study is another example of the global impact of the environmental changes being felt as the world warmed up at the end of the last ice age.

“It’s interesting in that it confirms again that domestication begins at the start of the Holocene period, when we have this climate change that we see as we exit from the ice age,” said Dr Lombardo.

“We entered this warm period, when all over the world at the same time, people start cultivating.”

The study has been published in the journal Nature.

Amazon rainforest reaches point of no return (Climate News Network)

March 16th, 2020, by Jessica Rawnsley

Satellite mapping of the devastating fires that swept through the rainforest in August last year.
Image: NASA Earth Observatory/Joshua Stevens

Brazilian rainforest expert warns that increased deforestation under President Bolsonaro’s regime is having a catastrophic effect on climate.

LONDON, 16 March, 2020 – Antonio Donato Nobre is passionate about the Amazon region and despairs about the level of deforestation taking place in what is the world’s biggest rainforest.

“Just when I thought the destruction couldn’t get any worse, it has,” says Nobre, one of Brazil’s leading scientists who has studied the Amazon – its unique flora and fauna, and its influence on both the local and global climate – for more than 40 years.

“In terms of the Earth’s climate, we have gone beyond the point of no return. There’s no doubt about this.”

For decades, he has fought against deforestation. There have been considerable ups and downs in that time, but he points out that Brazil was once a world-leader in controlling deforestation.

“We developed the system that’s now being used by other countries,” he told Climate News Network in an interview during his lecture tour of the UK.

“Using satellite data, we monitored and we controlled. From 2005 to 2012, Brazil managed to reduce up to 83% of deforestation.”

Dramatic increase

Then the law on land use was relaxed, and deforestation increased dramatically – by as much as 200% between 2017 and 2018.

It’s all become much worse since Jair Bolsonaro became Brazilian president at the beginning of last year, Nobre says.

“There are some dangerous people in office,” he says. “The Minister of Environment is a convicted criminal. The Minister of Foreign Affairs is a climate sceptic.”

Nobre argues that Bolsonaro doesn’t care about the Amazon and has contempt for environmentalists.

His administration is encouraging the land grabbers who illegally take over protected or indigenous tribal land, which they then sell on to cattle ranchers and soybean conglomerates.

For indigenous tribes, life has become more dangerous. “They are being murdered, their land is being invaded,” Nobre says.

In August last year, the world watched as large areas of the Amazon region – a vital carbon sink sucking up and recycling global greenhouse gases – went up in flames.

Nobre says the land grabbers had organised what they called a “day of fires” in August last year to honour Bolsonaro.

“Half of the Amazon rainforest to the east is gone . It’s losing the battle, going in the direction of a savanna.”

“Thousands of people organized, through WhatsApp, to make something visible from space,” he says. “They hired people on motorbikes with gasoline jugs to set fire to any land they could.”

The impact on the Amazon is catastrophic, Nobre says. “Half of the Amazon rainforest to the east is gone – it’s losing the battle, going in the direction of a savanna.

“When you clear land in a healthy system, it bounces back. But once you cross a certain threshold, a tipping point, it turns into a different kind of equilibrium. It becomes drier, there’s less rain. It’s no longer a forest.”

As well as storing and recycling vast amounts of greenhouse gas, the trees in the Amazon play a vital role in harvesting heat from the Earth’s surface and transforming water vapour into condensation above the forest. This acts like a giant sprinkler system in the sky, Nobre explains..

When the trees go and this system breaks down, the climate alters not only in the Amazon region but over a much wider area.

Time running out

“We used to say the Amazon had two seasons: the wet season and the wetter season,” Nobre says. “Now, you have many months without a drop of water.”

Nobre spent many years living and carrying out research in the rainforest and is now attached to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE).

The vast majority of Brazilians, he says, are against deforestation and are concerned about climate change – but while he believes that there is still hope for the rainforest, he says that time is fast running out.

Many leading figures in Brazil, including a group of powerful generals, have been shocked by the international reaction to the recent spate of fires in the Amazon and fear that the country is becoming a pariah on the global stage.

Nobre is angry with his own government, but also with what he describes as the massive conspiracy on climate change perpetrated over the years by the oil, gas and coal lobbies.

Ever since the late 1970s, the fossil fuel companies’ scientists have known about the consequences of the build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

“They brought us to this situation knowingly,” Nobre says. “It’s not something they did out of irresponsible ignorance. They paid to bash the science.” – Climate News Network

Jessica Rawnsley is a UK-based environmental journalist. She has written stories on the Extinction Rebellion movement and police tactics connected with demonstrations. She has a particular interest in campaigning groups and their influence on government climate policies.

Reservas legais preservam o poder da floresta de fazer chover (O Globo)

Ana Lucia Azevedo

02/05/2019 – 04:30

Projeto de lei que revoga unidades de conservação pode provocar impactos em setores como agricultura, geração de energia e turismo

Para especialistas, projeto de lei que revoga obrigatoriedade de reservas legais em propriedades rurais coloca em risco equilíbrio e a proteção da floresta Foto: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/22-9-2017
Para especialistas, projeto de lei que revoga obrigatoriedade de reservas legais em propriedades rurais coloca em risco equilíbrio e a proteção da floresta Foto: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/22-9-2017

RIO — Um dos ditados populares da Amazônia diz que “a floresta faz chover”. E faz, não só na Região Norte, mas muito distante, no Sul do Brasil e até em partes da Argentina e do Uruguai, com impacto sobre a agricultura, a geração de energia e o turismo.

A discussão sobre as consequências do projeto de lei 2.362/2019, dos senadores Flávio Bolsonaro (PSL-RJ) e Márcio Bittar (MDB-AC), que revoga a obrigatoriedade de se manter a chamada reserva legal nas propriedades rurais, acabou por destacar a relevância da Floresta Amazônica para o clima do Brasil. É na Amazônia que nascem os rios voadores que distribuem chuvas no país.

A expressão rios voadores foi criada há quase duas décadas pelo meteorologista José Marengo, coordenador geral de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento do Centro Nacional de Monitoramento e Alertas de Desastres Naturais (Cemaden). Ela se refere aos jatos de ar carregados de umidade que se originam sobre a floresta e atravessam o Brasil, a cerca de 3 mil metros de altitude.

Um de seus efeitos bem estabelecidos é permitir a existência das florestas do oeste do Paraná, como as das cataratas do Parque Nacional do Iguaçu e as que protegem a Usina de Itaipu.

O climatologista Carlos Nobre, um dos mais respeitados especialistas do mundo em mudanças climáticas, explica que está comprovado que, quando uma seca castiga a Amazônia, chove menos em toda a vasta região que vai do oeste do Paraná, onde estão as florestas de Iguaçu, Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul, e chega até o centro-leste da Argentina, Uruguai e Paraguai.

Impacto na agricultura

Só existe floresta no Paraná porque chove no inverno por lá, e chove porque os rios voadores levam a umidade da Amazônia.

— Se não fosse a umidade da Amazônia, toda essa região seria uma savana — afirma Nobre.

Chove menos em Foz do Iguaçu, por exemplo, do que em Brasília. Enquanto nesta caem de 1.600 a 1700 milímetros de chuva por ano, em Foz a média é de 1.300 mm. Porém, Brasília tem uma estiagem de meio ano e vegetação de Cerrado. Já em Foz e em toda a área coberta pelos rios voadores, a chuva é distribuída ao longo do ano, graças a eles.

Os rios voadores são canais de umidade que transportam vapor d’água e fazem com que chova durante todo o ano, inclusive no inverno, normalmente seco no Centro-sul. Sem chuva ao longo de todo o ano, não há condições para existir uma floresta, observa Nobre.

As reservas legais protegem 80% das florestas de uma propriedade rural e são essenciais para deter o desmatamento e, assim, preservar a Amazônia e os rios voadores que ela gera. Mas, para Nobre, a maior importância das reservas legais está na proteção da própria Amazônia.

As florestas prestam serviços, como redução da temperatura — são até 3 graus Celsius menos quentes que plantações e pastagens —, produção de água, prevenção de erosão e polinização de culturas comerciais.

— O maior impacto do desmatamento das reservas legais será para a agricultura da região, que já enfrenta um clima hostil e um solo pobre — salienta.

Professor titular do Instituto de Física da USP e reconhecido como o maior especialista do mundo em química da atmosfera da Amazônia, Paulo Artaxo vê ameaça concreta de perdas para os investidores nos setores agrícola e de energia, que dependem da disponibilidade de água e da regularidade climática.

— O desmatamento afeta o fluxo de umidade na atmosfera e traz desequilíbrio. A destruição de reservas legais trará incerteza para o Brasil. Para quem investe, é um fator de risco.

Onde se escondem as poucas onças-pintadas que sobraram (Pesquisa Fapesp)

03 de março de 2017

Pesquisadores compõem retrato dos padrões de deslocamento do maior felino das Américas nos grandes biomas brasileiros. Na Mata Atlântica, restam apenas cerca de 300 indivíduos (foto: Eduardo Cesar/Revista Pesquisa FAPESP)

Peter Moon | Agência FAPESP – Restam apenas cerca de 300 onças-pintadas (Panthera onca) na Mata Atlântica. É muito, muito pouco. São inúmeras as razões para o desaparecimento eminente do maior felino das Américas ao longo do bioma que um dia se estendia desde o norte da Argentina, passando pelo Paraguai e Uruguai, até o Nordeste brasileiro.

A primeira e mais óbvia razão é que só restam 7% da Mata Atlântica original. A segunda, uma consequência direta, é que o pouco que sobrou é composto por áreas muito fragmentadas. Ou seja, as onças remanescentes precisam percorrer áreas muito maiores do que suas congêneres da Amazônia ou do Pantanal, por exemplo, para encontrar caça ou achar parceiros para cruzamento.

E como as áreas são muito fragmentadas, as andanças das onças na Mata Atlântica envolvem riscos cada vez mais frequentes de contato com humanos – o que envolve todo um leque de consequências letais para os grandes felinos. Elas viram alvo de caçadores, são atropeladas, são vítima da retaliação por parte de fazendeiros e pecuaristas ou perseguidas pela população em geral, que tem medo desses bichos.

Todas essas conclusões foram publicadas em novembro em um grande estudo internacional na Scientific Reports, da Nature. Entre os pesquisadores envolvidos no trabalho está o conservacionista Ronaldo Gonçalves Morato, chefe do Centro Nacional de Pesquisa e Conservação de Mamíferos Carnívoros do Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade (ICMBio), em Atibaia (SP).

Em outro artigo, publicado no fim de dezembro, Morato e colaboradores vão além das conclusões do trabalho sobre as onças da Mata Atlântica para começar a compor um retrato dos padrões de deslocamento das onças-pintadas em cinco grandes biomas brasileiros – e os riscos que elas correm em cada um deles. O artigo foi publicado na revista PLoS ONE. A pesquisa teve apoio da FAPESP, por meio de uma bolsa de pesquisa, me nível de pós-doutorado no exterior, concedida a Morato para a realização no Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, nos Estados Unidos.

“O objetivo da pesquisa foi verificar as condições de deslocamento e o tamanho da área de vida das onças-pintadas em cada um desses biomas brasileiros: Mata Atlântica, Cerrado, Caatinga, Pantanal e Amazônia, e também no norte da Argentina”, disse Morato.

Para a obtenção dos dados de deslocamento, entre 1998 e 2016 foram monitorados 44 indivíduos que haviam sido previamente capturados, sedados e neles colocado um colar especial dotado de localizador por satélite (GPS).

Foram estudados 21 indivíduos no Pantanal, 12 na Mata Atlântica, oito na Amazônia, um no Cerrado e dois na Caatinga. Foram amostrados 22 machos e 22 fêmeas. As idades estimadas variaram de 18 meses até 10 anos, sendo que a maioria das onças (41) era adulta, com mais de três anos.

O GPS dos colares foi programado para informar a localização dos animais a cada uma hora, 24 horas por dia. Os períodos de monitoramento variaram de 11 até 1.749 dias (média de 183 dias), enquanto que o número de localizações registradas por indivíduo variou de 53 até 11 mil (média de 2.264). O total de registros somou 81 mil localizações, a maior já realizada no estudo de onças.

“Os colares tinham baterias capazes de durar cerca de 500 dias de uso. Mas bem antes disso, geralmente com 400 dias de monitoramento, acionamos um dispositivo que permite a soltura automática do colar do pescoço do animal. A seguir, tentamos recuperar o colar para seu reúso, o que nem sempre é possível”, disse Morato. Em certos casos, mesmo que o colar seja encontrado, nem sempre continua em condições de uso.

“Sabemos se o animal morreu quando o sinal do GPS permanece na mesma localização por 24 horas. Neste caso, dispara um sinal automático. Foi o que aconteceu no Pantanal Norte em 2010, quando uma onça atacou e matou um pescador. Houve retaliação e algumas onças foram mortas na região. Suspeitamos que um dos animais mortos em nosso projeto tenha sofrido retaliação”, disse.

De acordo com Morato, cerca de 80% dos animais residiam na região de monitoramento. Os demais apresentaram padrões de deslocamento nômades ou estavam em dispersão.

Os machos exibiram as maiores áreas de vida – o território ocupado durante a vida de cada animal. É um resultado compatível com a hipótese de que a necessidade de maiores áreas por parte dos machos de espécies carnívoras está ligada à distribuição das fêmeas e à necessidade de maximizar as oportunidades reprodutivas.

“As onças com a maior área de vida foram as da Mata Atlântica, que muitas vezes precisam se aventurar por pastagens e campos cultivados para passar de um fragmento de floresta ao outro, correndo o risco de contato com humanos”, disse Morato.

Mobilidade limitada

Entre todos os animais, o do Cerrado mostrou necessidade de maior área de vida (1.268 km2). No Brasil, a onça com menor área de vida (36 km2) estava no Pantanal. Para efeito de comparação, a ilha de Santa Catarina tem 424 km2.

“Pela primeira vez conseguimos comparar os deslocamentos das onças nos diversos biomas. O próximo passo envolve saber como os animais se comportam nas diferentes estruturas e paisagens. Queremos verificar quais são os fatores que limitam a mobilidade das onças em cada bioma”, disse Morato.

Segundo o pesquisador, é importante saber o que limita os deslocamentos das onças, uma vez que a saúde do animal depende da sua variabilidade genética, que por sua vez depende da capacidade de os indivíduos encontrarem parceiros sexuais de outros grupos que não os familiares. É a mesma lógica que não indica o casamento entre primos, por exemplo.

O artigo Space Use and Movement of a Neotropical Top Predator: The Endangered Jaguar(http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0168176), de Ronaldo G. Morato e outros, publicado na PLoS One, pode ser lido em: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0168176.

O artigo A biodiversity hotspot losing its top predator: The challenge of jaguar conservation in the Atlantic Forest of South America(doi:10.1038/srep37147), publicado na Scientific Reports, pode ser lido em: www.nature.com/articles/srep37147.

Antropólogo cria primeiro Centro de Medicina Indígena em Manaus (G1)

Pesquisador idealizou projeto após uma parente se curar de uma picada de cobra com tratamento que uniu saber científico e indígena. 


Indígena Manoel Lima assumir a função de “Grande Kumu”, no Amazonas (Foto: Ive Rylo/G1 AM)

Indígena Manoel Lima assumir a função de “Grande Kumu”, no Amazonas (Foto: Ive Rylo/G1 AM)

A sabedoria herdada de seus avós a longo de 85 anos fez o indígena Manoel Lima assumir a função de “Grande Kumu”, pajé do povo Tuyuka, no Amazonas. Ele é um dos indígenas que, junto com um dos membros do Colegiado Indígena, do Programa de Pós-graduação em Antropologia Social da Universidade Federal do Amazonas (Ufam), criaram o Bahserikowi´i”, ou Centro de Medicina Indígena da Amazônia. O espaço abre as portas para o público em Manaus nesta terça-feira (6). O local não conta com apoio ou interferência das secretarias de saúde do governo e prefeitura.

“Não é para abandonar a indicação dos médicos [tradicionais] mas para agregar”, disse o antropólogo João Paulo Tukano que idealizou o projeto após uma parente se curar de uma picada de cobra com um tratamento que uniu saber científico e indígena.

De acordo com o idealizador do centro, o espaço busca aliar tratamento milenares utilizados nas aldeias para ajudar a pessoas doentes, indígenas ou não, sem esquecer da medicina tradicional.

“Aqui é mais uma opção de tratamento de saúde, baseado em técnica e tecnologias indígenas usadas de geração em geração”, disse Tukano.

Nesta terça-feira, o kumu Tuyuka começa a oferecer serviços. Além dele, pajés das etnias Tikuna, Satere Mawé, Baniwa, Apurinã estarão disponíveis. No local, os tratamentos são feitos de duas formas, iniciando pelo Bahsesé – uma espécie de benzimento – seguido da indicação dos medicamentos.

“O Bahsesé não é ficar rezando. O Kumu aciona princípios curativos contidos nos vegetais e nos animais. É nessa hora, quando ele fica falando, que ele invoca os princípios dentro de um elemento para ver o que pode passar para a pessoa para curar”, disse

Apoio

O prédio foi cedido pela Coordenação das Organizações Indígenas da Amazônia Brasileira (Coiab). A manutenção do local é feita pelos próprios indígenas e por amigos. A venda de artesanato e de medicamentos caseiros serão feitas no local para auxiliar na manutenção do Centro. Os atendimentos serão feitos de segunda a sexta-feira das 9h as 13h, na rua Bernardo Ramos, 97, Centro de Manaus. O valor de cada atendimento é R$ 10.

Kumu Manoel

Para ser um grande kumu da aldeia, Manoel Lima contou que foi treinado com os avós desde muito cedo, segundo conta.

“Aprendi com os meus avós, quando tinha seis anos de idade. Desde cedo fui treinado. Nós ficávamos 4 meses longe da aldeia, dentro do mato, onde não tem barulho para se dedicar só ao aprendizado da cura. Treinamos para ser grande Kumu”, disse.

Os Kumus vivem em São Gabriel da Cachoeira, nas comunidades de Taraque, Iauaritê e Paricachoeirinha. Por conta da dificuldade de acesso às aldeias e à falta de maiores investimentos na saúde, os indígenas reclamam que quase não têm acesso aos tratamentos da medicina “branca tradicional”. Por isso, as técnicas de cura herdada dos ancestrais ainda hoje são importantes e passadas de pai para filho dentro das aldeias.

Produtos feitos a base de ervas são vendidos no local, em Manaus (Foto: Iver Rylo/G1 AM)

Produtos feitos a base de ervas são vendidos no local, em Manaus (Foto: Iver Rylo/G1 AM) 

“Com essa novidade, eu estou muito feliz, é uma iniciativa inédita. Eu já oferecia os tratamentos em casa há muito tempo, não era divulgado e agora é uma coisa grande”, disse o kumu.

Ele garante que existem curas para todos os tipos de enfermidades, inclusive para o que os médicos estão chamando de “mal do século”: a ansiedade e depressão.

“Tratamos desde doenças da cabeça até problemas no útero e menstruação desregulada”, garantiu.

Motivação

A necessidade de agregar e respeitar variadas formas de tratamentos e saberes, dando visibilidade ao conhecimento indígena foi despertada em João Paulo há sete anos, quando a sobrinha dele quase teve a perna amputada.

“O médico decidiu amputar a perna dela. Meu pai disse que não precisava e poderíamos fazer [o tratamento] em conjunto, os médicos e nós indígenas. O médico não aceitou e disse ‘o senhor não estudou nenhum dia, eu estudei 8 anos’. Fiquei muito abatido, triste e nervoso. Pensei melhor e esta foi uma motivação para eu estudar e tratar ele de igual para igual. E caminhei mais para antropologia”, disse João Paulo.

O caso repercutiu, foi para a justiça, o governo entrou em cena e uma nova equipe de médicos foi formada no Hospital Universitário Getúlio Vargas. À época, No dia 15 de janeiro, Ministério Público Federal chegou a recomendar a um dos hospitais onde a menino foi levada que promovesse a articulação dos conhecimentos da medicina comum com o conhecimento e as práticas tradicionais de saúde dos índios tukano.

“Com a outra equipe pudemos dialogar. O médico quis ouvir meu pai e meu pai falou o que gostaria de fazer e eles respeitaram. Primeiro sugerimos tratamento com plantas, o médico disse que não aconselhava e listou os motivos, depois sugerimos com água mineral e foi acordado num diálogo”, disse.

O tratamento dos médicos em parceira com os pajés Tukano deu certo. A menina não teve a perna amputada e hoje, com 19 anos, tem muita história para contar. “Temos vários casos, meus parentes sofrem. Esse veio à tona porque eu briguei”, disse o antropólogo.

Além o desconhecimento da medicina tradicional aos tratamentos indígenas, a dificuldade dos povos indígenas em conseguir atendimento de saúde na capital também motivou a criação do centro.

“Um dos nossos objetivos é disponibilizar o acesso a tratamento para indígenas que estão em Manaus, porque muito reclamam da dificuldade de chegar as unidades de saúde. É muito comum acontecer do indígena não conseguir tratamento”, lamentou o antropólogo.

Centro fica em uma casa antiga no Centro de Manaus (Foto: Ive Rylo/G1 AM)

Centro fica em uma casa antiga no Centro de Manaus (Foto: Ive Rylo/G1 AM)

Long Before Making Enigmatic Earthworks, People Reshaped Brazil’s Rain Forest (N.Y.Times)

By   FEB. 10, 2017

New research suggests people were sustainably managing the Amazon rain forest much earlier than was previously thought. Credit: Jenny Watling 

Deep in the Amazon, the rain forest once covered ancient secrets. Spread across hundreds of thousands of acres are massive, geometric earthworks. The carvings stretch out in circles and squares that can be as big as a city block, with trenches up to 12 yards wide and 13 feet deep. They appear to have been built up to 2,000 years ago.

Were the broken ceramics found near the entrances used for ritual sacrifices? Why were they here? The answer remains a mystery.

There are 450 geoglyphs concentrated in Brazil’s Acre State. Credit: Jenny Watling 

For centuries, the enigmatic structures remained hidden to all but a few archaeologists. Then in the 1980s, ranchers cleared land to raise cattle, uncovering the true extent of the earthworks in the process. More than 450 of these geoglyphs are concentrated within Acre State in Brazil.

Since the discovery, archaeological study of the earthworks and other evidence has challenged the notion that the rain forests of the Amazon were untouched by human hands before the arrival of European explorers in the 15th century. And while the true purpose of the geoglyphs remains unknown, a study published on Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers new insight into the lives of the ancient people who lived in the Amazon. Thousands of years before the earthworks were built, humans were managing the forests, using what appear to be sustainable agricultural practices.

“Our study was looking at the environmental impact that the geoglyph builders had on the landscape,” said Jennifer Watling, an archaeologist at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, who conducted the research while a student at the University of Exeter in Britain. “A lot of people have the idea that the Amazon forests are pristine forests, never touched by humans, and that’s obviously not the case.”

Dr. Watling and her team reconstructed a 6,000-year-old environmental history of two geoglyph sites in the Amazon rain forest. To do this, they searched for clues in soil samples in and around the sites. Microscopic plant fossils called phytoliths told them about ancient vegetation. Bits of charcoal revealed evidence of burnings. And a kind of carbon dating gave them a sense of how open the vegetation had been in the past.

About 4,000 years ago, people started burning the forest, which was mostly bamboo, just enough to make small openings. They may have planted maize or squash, weeded out some underbrush, and transported seeds or saplings to create a partly curated forest of useful tree products that Dr. Watling calls a “prehistoric supermarket.” After that, they started building the geoglyphs. The presence of just a few artifacts, and the layout of the earthworks, suggest they weren’t used as ancient villages or for military defenses. They were likely built for rituals, some archaeologists suspect.

Dr. Watling and her colleagues found that in contrast with the large-scale deforestation we see today — which threatens about 20 percent of the largest rain forest in the world — ancient indigenous people of the Amazon practiced something more akin to what we now call agroforestry. They restricted burns to site locations and maintained the surrounding landscape, creating small, temporary clearings in the bamboo and promoting the growth of plants like palm, cedar and Brazil nut that were, and still are, useful commodities. Today, indigenous groups around the world continue these sustainable practices in forests.

“Indigenous communities have actually transformed the ecosystem over a very long time,” said Dr. Watling. “The modern forest owes its biodiversity to the agroforestry practices that were happening during the time of the geoglyph builders.”

Hundreds of ancient earthworks built in the Amazon (Science Daily)

Date:
February 7, 2017
Source:
University of Exeter
Summary:
The Amazonian rainforest was transformed over 2,000 years ago by ancient people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.

Geoglyph photos. Credit: Jenny Watling

The Amazonian rainforest was transformed over two thousand years ago by ancient people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.

Findings by Brazilian and UK experts provide new evidence for how indigenous people lived in the Amazon before European people arrived in the region.

The ditched enclosures, in Acre state in the western Brazilian Amazon, were concealed for centuries by trees. Modern deforestation has allowed the discovery of more than 450 of these large geometrical geoglyphs.

The function of these mysterious sites is still little understood — they are unlikely to be villages, since archaeologists recover very few artefacts during excavation. The layout doesn’t suggest they were built for defensive reasons. It is thought they were used only sporadically, perhaps as ritual gathering places.

The structures are ditched enclosures that occupy roughly 13,000 km2. Their discovery challenges assumptions that the rainforest ecosystem has been untouched by humans.

The research was carried out by Jennifer Watling, post-doctoral researcher at the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography, University of São Paulo, when she was studying for a PhD at the University of Exeter.

Dr Watling said: “The fact that these sites lay hidden for centuries beneath mature rainforest really challenges the idea that Amazonian forests are ‘pristine ecosystems`.

“We immediately wanted to know whether the region was already forested when the geoglyphs were built, and to what extent people impacted the landscape to build these earthworks.”

Using state-of-the-art methods, the team members were able to reconstruct 6000 years of vegetation and fire history around two geoglyph sites. They found that humans heavily altered bamboo forests for millennia and small, temporary clearings were made to build the geoglyphs.

Instead of burning large tracts of forest — either for geoglyph construction or agricultural practices — people transformed their environment by concentrating on economically valuable tree species such as palms, creating a kind of ‘prehistoric supermarket’ of useful forest products. The team found tantalizing evidence to suggest that the biodiversity of some of Acre’s remaining forests may have a strong legacy of these ancient ‘agroforestry’ practices.

Dr. Watling said: “Despite the huge number and density of geoglyph sites in the region, we can be certain that Acre’s forests were never cleared as extensively, or for as long, as they have been in recent years.

“Our evidence that Amazonian forests have been managed by indigenous peoples long before European Contact should not be cited as justification for the destructive, unsustainable land-use practiced today. It should instead serve to highlight the ingenuity of past subsistence regimes that did not lead to forest degradation, and the importance of indigenous knowledge for finding more sustainable land-use alternatives.”

The full article will be released in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA and involved researchers from the universities of Exeter, Reading and Swansea (UK), São Paulo, Belém and Acre (Brazil). The research was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, National Geographic, and the Natural Environment Research Council Radiocarbon Facility.

To conduct the study, the team extracted soil samples from a series of pits dug within and outside of the geoglyphs. From these soils, they analysed ‘phytoliths’, a type of microscopic plant fossil made of silica, to reconstruct ancient vegetation; charcoal quantities, to assess the amount of ancient forest burning; and carbon stable isotopes, to indicate how ‘open’ the vegetation was in the past.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jennifer Watling, José Iriarte, Francis E. Mayle, Denise Schaan, Luiz C. R. Pessenda, Neil J. Loader, F. Alayne Street-Perrott, Ruth E. Dickau, Antonia Damasceno, Alceu Ranzi. Impact of pre-Columbian “geoglyph” builders on Amazonian forestsProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201614359 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1614359114

Rio Acre diminui 18 cm e compromete o abastecimento de água no Estado (MCTIC)

Segundo Cemaden, água captada do rio chega às estações de tratamento com barro, o que prejudica o abastecimento. Relatório cita previsão de chuva a partir de 17 de agosto, mas em volume insuficiente

Em 12 dias, o rio Acre diminuiu 18 centímetros, atingindo 1,35 metro em Rio Branco, o menor nível já registrado. Os dados foram divulgados pelo Centro Nacional de Monitoramento e Alertas de Desastres Naturais (Cemaden), vinculado ao Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovações e Comunicações, no relatório sobre a seca no estado. Se a estiagem persistir, o rio pode atingir 1,06 metro em 10 de setembro.

“Há uma série de impactos decorrentes dessa situação. A agricultura é totalmente prejudicada. A navegação também é influenciada, pois os barcos não conseguem navegar, e o abastecimento de cidades do interior do estado fica comprometido”, observou o coordenador-geral de Operações do Cemaden, Marcelo Seluchi.

Outro ponto destacado pelo climatologista é o abastecimento de água para a população. Segundo ele, a água que chega às estações de tratamento tem maior quantidade de barro, e essas unidades precisam trabalhar mais para entregar um produto de qualidade para a população. Para isso, foi preciso ajustar as bombas de captação para o volume menor, processo semelhante ao adotado no Sistema Cantareira, em São Paulo (SP).

“Há dificuldade no abastecimento e perda de qualidade da água. O processo de tratamento é mais demorado e acaba encarecido”, afirmou Marcelo Seluchi.

De acordo com o relatório do Cemaden, as chuvas têm sido deficientes desde março, e o período entre junho e agosto é o mais seco do ano no Acre. O documento cita previsão de chuva a partir de 17 de agosto, mas em volume “pouco expressivo”. “Não há expectativa de recuperação do quadro hídrico até o mês de setembro, embora possam ocorrer chuvas ocasionais”, alerta o Cemaden no documento.

“Tivemos alguns quadros de chuvas nos últimos dias, mas não há indícios concretos de que o período chuvoso vá começar na época considerada normal. Precisamos coletar mais dados para poder fazer uma previsão mais acurada”, reforçou Seluchi.

Queimadas

No documento, os pesquisadores também alertam para o risco de incêndios florestais no estado, que registrou, até 26 de julho, três vezes mais ocorrências de focos de calor que o máximo já detectado desde 1998.

De acordo com o Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Inpe), entre janeiro e agosto de 2016, o Acre teve 1.120 focos de incêndio, um aumento de 222% em relação ao mesmo período do ano passado.

MCTIC

Seca pode levar o rio Acre ao seu nível histórico mais baixo (Pesquisa Fapesp)

15 de agosto de 2016

Seca pode levar o rio Acre ao seu nível histórico mais baixoSegundo o Grupo de Trabalho em Previsão Climática do MCTIC, estiagem deve afetar navegação e abastecimento dos ribeirinhos, além do risco de queimadas e incêndios florestais na Amazônia e área central do país (Foto: Rio Acre/Agência Acre)

Agência FAPESP – A seca que atinge o sudoeste da Amazônia, especialmente o Acre, deve se agravar ainda mais nos próximos meses, alertou o Grupo de Trabalho em Previsão Climática Sazonal (GTPCS) do Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovações e Comunicações (MCTIC), de acordo com a Assessoria de Comunicação Social do Ministério.

Segundo a previsão, o rio Acre deve atingir o seu mais baixo nível histórico (entre 1,20m e 1,30m) e impactar a navegação e o abastecimento de comunidades ribeirinhas da região. O levantamento é válido para os meses de agosto, setembro e outubro deste ano.

O Acre é o estado mais afetado pela estiagem que se estende também para o norte da Amazônia. Desde março, o volume de chuvas é deficitário na região, em parte por conta do El Niño, que começou no outono do ano passado. O fenômeno está associado ao aquecimento das águas do Oceano Pacífico equatorial, alterando os ventos em boa parte do planeta e o regime de chuvas. Na região Norte, leva à seca. A partir de junho, o La Niña, fenômeno oposto, começou a se desenvolver de forma fraca.

“Esta estiagem é fruto de uma interação de vários fenômenos, notadamente o El Niño e a La Niña. Ela já se estende há quase seis meses, e não temos uma noção exata de quando vai normalizar. Estamos acompanhando a situação mensalmente para avaliar como ela se comporta”, afirmou o chefe da Divisão de Pesquisas do Centro Nacional de Monitoramento e Alertas de Desastres Naturais (Cemaden), José Marengo, à Assessoria de Comunicação Social do MCTIC.

O documento alerta ainda para o alto risco de queimadas e incêndios florestais, especialmente na área central do Brasil e no sul e no leste da Amazônia. O número de focos de incêndio pode atingir máximas históricas. Contudo, a adoção de medidas de controle pode mitigar o problema no trimestre.

Poucas chuvas no Nordeste

A região Nordeste também deve sofrer mais com a estiagem no período analisado. De acordo com o grupo de previsão climática do MCTIC, tradicionalmente, agosto é o último mês da estação chuvosa na parte leste da região, mas tem chovido pouco desde abril, início do período de precipitações na região. Com a baixa incidência de chuvas nos últimos anos, a tendência é que a situação se repita na zona da mata, que já apresenta valores abaixo da média para a época do ano.

“O panorama de poucas chuvas nessa área vem se arrastando desde 2012, e os níveis dos reservatórios e dos rios estão muito baixos, mesmo na zona da mata. E isso gera problemas para a população, porque pode haver desabastecimento”, destacou José Marengo.

Participam do GTPCS o Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Inpe), o Centro Nacional de Monitoramento e Alertas de Desastres Naturais (Cemaden) e o Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (Inpa). A íntegra do documento pode ser acessada aqui no endereço http://www.cemaden.gov.br/previsao-climatica-para-o-trimestre-aso2016/.

Mudanças climáticas podem levar à exclusão de espécies arbóreas em áreas úmidas (INPA)

JC 5423, 24 de maio de 2016

Alterações na composição de espécies vegetais poderão trazer implicações para toda a cadeia alimentar, incluindo o homem

Cheias e secas extremas e subsequentes, como essas que os rios da Amazônia vêm sofrendo nas duas últimas décadas, podem levar à exclusão de espécies de árvores e à colonização por outras espécies menos tolerantes à inundação.

É o que apontam estudos desenvolvidos por pesquisadores associados ao Grupo Ecologia, Monitoramento e Uso Sustentável de Áreas Úmidas (Maua) do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (Inpa/MCTI), em Manaus, que participa, desde 2013, do Programa de Pesquisas Ecológicas de Longa Duração (Peld), por meio do Peld-Maua.

Durante a década de 1970, por exemplo, os níveis máximos anuais do rio Negro ficaram alguns metros acima do valor médio da enchente, e a descida das águas não foi intensa, resultando na inundação de várias populações de plantas durante anos consecutivos. Isso causou a exclusão de muitas espécies arbustivas e arbóreas nas baixas topografias de igapós na região da Amazônia Central, como é o caso de macacarecuia (Eschweilera tenuifolia).

“Acredita-se que esses fenômenos podem ser consequência das mudanças climáticas em curso, mas podem também derivar de variações naturais do ciclo hidrológico. Os estudos realizados no âmbito do Peld-Maua visam confirmar a origem desses fenômenos utilizando informações sobre o crescimento da vegetação”, adianta a coordenadora do Peld-Maua, a pesquisadora do Inpa Maria Teresa Fernandez Piedade.

Anos de secas ou cheias consecutivas podem ultrapassar a capacidade adaptativa das espécies de árvores, especialmente de populações estabelecidas nos extremos do ótimo de distribuição no gradiente inundável (composição de diferentes níveis de inundação a que estão sujeitas as áreas alagáveis).

Segundo Piedade, como a vegetação sustenta a fauna desses ambientes, mudanças na composição de espécies vegetais poderão trazer implicações para toda a cadeia alimentar, incluindo o homem. “A vegetação arbórea das áreas alagáveis amazônicas é bem adaptada à dinâmica anual de cheias e vazantes”, destaca a pesquisadora.

Para ela, determinar o grau de tolerância a períodos extremos das espécies de árvores desses ambientes e de sua fauna associada, como os peixes e roedores, e conhecer sua reação com a dinâmica de alternância entre fases inundadas e não inundadas normais e extremas é um grande desafio e se constitui na base para seu uso sustentável e preservação.

Segundo Piedade, as áreas úmidas (várzeas, igapós, buritizais e outros tipos) cobrem cerca de 30% da região amazônica e são de fundamental importância ecológica e econômica. Ela explica que na várzea, múltiplas atividades econômicas são tradicionalmente desenvolvidas, como a pesca e a agricultura familiar, enquanto que nos igapós, por serem mais pobres em nutrientes e em espécies de plantas e animais, menos atividades econômicas são praticadas. Já nas campinas/campinaranas alagáveis essas atividades são ainda mais reduzidas.

“A ecologia, o funcionamento e as limitações para determinadas práticas econômicas nas várzeas são bastante conhecidas, mas nos igapós de água pretas e nas campinas/campinaranas alagáveis tais aspectos ainda são pouco estudados”, diz Piedade. “Embora se saiba que esses ambientes são frágeis, aumentar e disponibilizar informações sobre eles é fundamental”, acrescenta.

Peld-Mauá

Com o título “Monitoramento e modelagem de dois grandes ecossistemas de áreas úmidas amazônicas em cenários de mudanças climáticas”, o Peld-Maua é um projeto financiado pelo Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), e também conta com recursos da Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Amazonas (Fapeam). Insere-se no plano de ação “Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação para Natureza e Clima”, do MCTI.

O Programa Peld foca no estabelecimento de sítios de pesquisa permanentes em diversos ecossistemas do País, integrados em redes para o desenvolvimento e o acompanhamento de pesquisas ecológicas de longa duração. Atualmente, existem 31 sítios de pesquisa vigentes.

O Peld-Maua é gerenciado pelo Inpa, em Manaus. Tem como vice-coordenador o pesquisador do Inpa, Jochen Schöngart; e como coordenador do Banco de Dados o pesquisador Florian Wittmann, do Departamento de Biogeoquímica do Instituto Max-Planck de Química, com sede em Mainz, na Alemanha.

A coordenadora do Peld-Maua explica que as atividades tiveram início há três anos. “Na primeira fase, que será completada agora em 2016, o Peld-Maua priorizou estudos em um ambiente de igapó e outro de campinarana alagável, mas espera-se que os estudos tenham continuidade e sejam expandidos para outras tipologias alagáveis amazônicas”, diz Piedade.

O Peld-Maua desenvolve estudos nas áreas de inundação das florestas de igapó no Parque Nacional do Jaú (Parna Jaú) – Unidade de Conservação localizada entre os municípios de Novo Airão e Barcelos, no Amazonas –, e ao longo dos gradientes de profundidade do lençol freático das florestas de campinas/campinaranas na Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável (RDS) do Uatumã, situada entre os municípios de São Sebastião do Uatumã e Itapiranga, também no Amazonas.

Conforme Piedade, diante da conectividade entre os ambientes alagáveis e as formações contíguas de terra-firme ou outras, os sítios de estudos foram escolhidos em ambientes onde os gradientes podem ser também avaliados. “Isso aumenta as possibilidades de trabalhos comparativos”, ressalta.

O Peld-Maua tem por objetivo relacionar a estrutura, composição florística e dinâmica de plantas que produzem sementes (fanerógamas) de dois ecossistemas de áreas úmidas na Amazônia Central com fatores do solo e da disponibilidade de água (hidro-edáficos), por meio do monitoramento em longo prazo para entender possíveis impactos e respostas da vegetação frente a mudanças dos regimes pluviométricos e hidrológicos.

O programa, até o momento, já permitiu a realização de cinco dissertações de mestrado e uma tese de doutorado. Além dos estudos já finalizados, estão em andamento dois pós-doutorados, seis doutorados e quatro mestrados. Quanto à formação de pessoal, dois bolsistas do Programa de Capacitação Institucional (PCI) concluíram suas atividades e dois estão realizando seus projetos, e dois bolsistas do programa de Bolsa de Fomento ao Desenvolvimento Tecnológico (DTI) e dois Pibic’s realizaram seus projetos junto ao Peld-Maua.

Inpa

The Dark Side of Ayahuasca (Men’s Journal)

By   Mar 2013

Every day, hundreds of tourists arrive in Iquitos, Peru, seeking spiritual catharsis or just to trip their heads off. But increasingly often their trip becomes a nightmare, and some of them don’t go home at all.

The dark side of ayahuasca

Credit: Joshua Paul

Kyle Nolan spent the summer of 2011 talking up a documentary called ‘Stepping Into the Fire,’ about the mind-expanding potential of ayahuasca. The film tells the story of a hard-driving derivatives trader and ex-Marine named Roberto Velez, who, in his words, turned his back on the “greed, power, and vice” of Wall Street after taking ayahuasca with a Peruvian shaman. The film is a slick promotion for the hallucinogenic tea that’s widely embraced as a spirit cure, and for the Shimbre Shamanic Center, the ayahuasca lodge Velez built for his guru, a potbellied medicine man called Master Mancoluto. The film’s message is that we Westerners have lost our way and that the ayahuasca brew (which is illegal in the United States because it contains the psychedelic compound DMT) can set us straight.

Last August, 18-year-old Nolan left his California home and boarded a plane to the Amazon for a 10-day, $1,200 stay at Shimbre in Peru’s Amazon basin with Mancoluto – who is pitched in Shimbre’s promotional materials as a man to help ayahuasca recruits “open their minds to deeper realities, develop their intuitive capabilities, and unlock untapped potential.” But when Nolan – who was neither “flaky” nor “unreliable,” says his father, Sean – didn’t show up on his return flight home, his mother, Ingeborg Oswald, and his triplet sister, Marion, went to Peru to find him. Initially, Mancoluto, whose real name is José Pineda Vargas, told them Kyle had packed his bags and walked off without a word. The shaman even joined Oswald on television pleading for help in finding her son, but the police in Peru remained suspicious. Under pressure, Mancoluto admitted that Nolan had died after an ayahuasca session and that his body had been buried at the edge of the property. The official cause of death has not yet been determined.

Pilgrims like Nolan are flocking to the Amazon in search of ayahuasca, either to expand their spiritual horizons or to cure alcoholism, depression, and even cancer, but what many of them find is a nightmare. Still, the airport in Iquitos is buzzing with ayahuasca tourism. Vans from shamanic lodges pick up psychedelic pilgrims from around the world, while taxi drivers peddle access to Indian medicine men. “It reminds me of how they sell cocaine and marijuana in Amsterdam,” one local said. “Here, it’s shamans and ayahuasca.”

Devotees talk about ayahuasca’s cathartic and life-changing power, but there is a dark side to the tourism boom as well. With money rolling in and lodges popping up across Peru’s sprawling Amazon, a new breed of shaman has emerged – and not all of them can be trusted with the powerful drug. Deaths like Nolan’s are uncommon, but reports of molestation, rape, and negligence at the hands of predatory and inept shamans are not. In the past few years alone, a young German woman was allegedly raped and beaten by two men who had administered ayahuasca to her, two French citizens died while staying at ayahuasca lodges, and stories persist about unwanted sexual advances and people losing their marbles after being given overly potent doses. The age of ayahuasca as purely a medicinal, consciousness-raising pursuit seems like a quaint and distant past.A powerful psychedelic, DMT is a natural compound found throughout the plant kingdom and in mammals (including humans). Scientists don’t know why it’s so prevalent in the world, but studies suggest a role in natural dreaming. DMT doesn’t work if swallowed alone, thanks to an enzyme in the gastrointestinal system that breaks it down. In a feat of prehistoric chemistry, Amazonian shamans fixed that by boiling two plants together – the ayahuasca vine and a DMT-containing shrub called chacruna – which shuts down the enzyme and allows the DMT to slip through the gut into the bloodstream.

Ayahuasca almost always induces vomiting before the hallucinogenic odyssey begins. It can be both horrifying and strangely blissful. One devotee described an ayahuasca trip as “psychotherapy on steroids.” But for all the root’s spiritual and therapeutic benefits, the ayahuasca boom is as wild and unmanageable as the jungle itself. One unofficial stat floating around Iquitos says the number of arriving pilgrims has grown fivefold in two years. Roger Rumrrill, a journalist who has written 25 books on the Amazon region, including several on shamanism, told me there’s “a corresponding boom in charlatans – in fake shamans, who are targeting foreigners.”

Few experts blame the concoction itself. Alan Shoemaker, who organizes an annual shamanism conference in Iquitos, says, “Ayahuasca is one of the sacred power plants and is completely nonaddictive, has been used for literally thousands of years for healing and divination purposes . . . and dying from overdose is virtually impossible.”

Still, no one monitors the medicine men, their claims, or their credentials. No one is making sure they screen patients for, say, heart problems, although ayahuasca is known to boost pulse rates and blood pressure. (When French citizen Celine René Margarite Briset died from a heart attack after taking ayahuasca in the Amazonian city of Yurimaguas in 2011, it was reported she had a preexisting heart condition.) And though many prospective ayahuasca-takers – people likely to have been prescribed antidepressants – struggle with addiction and depression, few shamans know or care to ask about antidepressants like Prozac, which can be deadly when mixed with ayahuasca. Reports suggested that a clash of meds killed 39-year-old Frenchman Fabrice Champion, who died a few months after Briset in an Iquitos-based lodge called Espiritu de Anaconda (which had already experienced one death and has since changed its name to Anaconda Cosmica). No one has been charged in either case.

Nor is anyone monitoring the growing number of lodges offering to train foreigners to make and serve the potentially deadly brew. Rumrrill scoffs at the idea. “People study for years to become a shaman,” he said. “You can’t become one in a few weeks….It’s a public health threat.” Disciples of ayahuasca insist that a shaman’s job is to control the movements of evil spirits in and out of the passengers, which in layman’s terms means keeping people from losing their shit. An Argentine tourist at the same lodge where Briset died reportedly stabbed himself in the chest after drinking too much of the tea. I met a passenger whose face was covered in thick scabs I assumed were symptoms of an illness for which he was being treated. It turns out he’d scraped the skin off himself during an understatedly “rough night with the medicine.” Because of ayahuasca’s power to plow through the psyche, many lodges screen patients for bipolar disorders or schizophrenia. But one local tour guide told me about a seeker who failed to disclose that he was schizophrenic. He drank ayahuasca and was later arrested – naked and crazed – in a public plaza. Critics worry that apprentice programs are churning out ayahuasqueros who are incapable of handling such cases.

Common are stories of female tourists who, under ayahuasca’s stupor, have faced sexual predators posing as healers. A nurse from Seattle says she booked a stay at a lodge run by a gringo shaman two hours outside Iquitos. When she slipped into ayahuasca’s trademark “state of hyper-suggestibility,” things got weird. “He placed his hands on my breast and groin and was talking a lot of shit to me,” she recalls. “I couldn’t talk. I was very weak.” She said she couldn’t confront the shaman. During the next session, he became verbally abusive. Fearing he might hurt her, she snuck off to the river, a tributary of the Amazon, late that night and swam away. She was lucky. In 2010, a 23-year-old German woman traveled to a tiny village called Barrio Florida for three nights of ayahuasca ceremonies. She ended up raped and brutally beaten by a “shaman” and his accomplice, who were both arrested. Last November, a Slovakian woman filed charges against a shaman, claiming she’d been raped during a ceremony at a lodge in Peru.

Even more troubling than ayahuasca is toé, a “witchcraft plant” that’s a member of the nightshade family. Also called Brugmansia, or angel’s trumpet, toé is known for its hallucinogenic powers. Skilled shamans use it in tiny amounts, but around Iquitos, people say irresponsible shamans dose foreigners with it to give them the Disneyland light shows they’ve come to expect. But there are downsides, to say the least. “Toé,” warns one reputable Iquitos lodge, “is potentially very dangerous, and excessive use can cause permanent mental impairment. Deaths are not uncommon from miscalculated dosages.” I heard horror stories. One ayahuasca tourist said, “Toé is a heavy, dark plant that’s associated with witchcraft for a reason: You can’t say no. Toé makes you go crazy. Some master shamans use it in small quantities, but it takes years to work with the plants. There’s nothing good to come out of it.”

Another visitor, an engineer from Washington, D.C., blames toé for his recent ayahuasca misadventure. He learned about ayahuasca on the internet and booked a multinight stay at one of the region’s most popular lodges. By the second night, he felt something was amiss. “When the shaman passed me the cup that night, he said, ‘We’re going to put you back together.’ I knew something was wrong. It was unbelievably strong.” The man says it hit him like a wave. “All around me, people started moaning. Then the yells and screaming started. Soon, I realized that medics were coming in and out of the hut, attending to people, trying to calm them down.” He angrily told me he was sure, based on hearing the bad trips of others who’d been given the substance, they had given him toé. “Ayahuasca,” he says, “should come with a warning label.”

Kyle’s father, Sean, suspects toé may have played a part in his son’s death, but he says he’s still raising the money he needs to get a California coroner to release the autopsy report. Mancoluto couldn’t be reached for comment, but his former benefactor, the securities trader Roberto Velez, now regrets his involvement with Mancoluto. “The man was evil and dangerous,” he says, “and the whole world needs to know so that no one ever seeks him again.” Some of Mancoluto’s former patients believe his brews included toé and have taken to the internet, claiming his practices were haphazard. (He allegedly sat in a tower overseeing his patients telepathically as they staggered through the forest.) One blog reports seeing a client “wandering out of the jungle, onto the road, talking to people who weren’t there, waving down cars, smoking imaginary cigarettes, and his eyes actually changed color, all of which indicated a high quantity of Brugmansia in Mancoluto’s brew.”

Shoemaker says that even though the majority of ayahuasca trips are positive and safe, things have gotten out of hand. “Misdosing with toé doesn’t make you a witch,” he says. “It makes you a criminal.” Velez, whose inspirational ayahuasca story was the focus of the film that sparked Kyle Nolan’s interest, is no longer an advocate. “It’s of life-and-death importance,” he warns, “that people don’t get involved with shamans they don’t know. I don’t know if anyone should trust a stranger with their soul.”

See also: Ayahuasca at Home: An American Experience

Related: Bucky McMahon’s goes Down the Monkey Hole on a Ayahuasca Retreat

Read more: http://www.mensjournal.com/magazine/the-dark-side-of-ayahuasca-20130215#ixzz3uxd2HGGI

Seca ameaça a Amazônia (Revista Fapesp)

Experimento feito na maior floresta tropical do mundo mostra colapso de árvores com ressecamento do solo 

MARIA GUIMARÃES | ED. 238 | DEZEMBRO 2015

 

Do alto de uma torre de 40 metros, fica visível a mortalidade das árvores maiores,  destacadas acima do dossel

Ao tomar suco por um canudo é preciso cuidado para manter o tubo bem imerso. Do contrário, bolhas de ar se formam e rompem a estrutura do fio líquido que leva a bebida do copo à boca. Aumente a escala para a altura de um prédio de 10 andares e pode imaginar o fluxo de água dentro de uma das gigantescas árvores amazônicas. A transpiração pelas folhas dá origem à sucção que movimenta a água desde as raízes até as imensas copas das árvores, que podem ultrapassar os 40 metros de altura, e lança para a atmosfera uma umidade responsável por entre 35% e 50% das chuvas na região, com impacto importante na hidrologia global. Quando esse sistema falha, o ciclo da água não é o único afetado. As árvores, que até então pareciam funcionar normalmente, subitamente morrem. Um experimento liderado pelo ecólogo inglês Patrick Meir, da Universidade de Edimburgo, na Escócia, e da Universidade Nacional da Austrália, provocou 15 anos de seca numa parcela amazônica e revelou o papel desse mecanismo, de acordo com artigo publicado em novembro na revista Nature.

Para construir o experimento foram necessários 500 metros cúbicos (m3) de madeira, 5 toneladas de plástico, 2 toneladas de pregos e 23 mil horas-homem (10 homens trabalhando de segunda a segunda por um ano), de acordo com o meteorologista Antonio Carlos Lola da Costa, da Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA). O resultado são 6 mil painéis de plástico que medem 3 metros (m) por 0,5 m cada um, entremeados por 18 calhas com 100 m de comprimento responsáveis por impedir que 50% da chuva que cai chegue ao solo numa parcela de  1 hectare na Floresta Nacional de Caxiuanã, no norte do Pará, onde o Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi mantém uma estação científica. “O Patrick me procurou em 1999 com essa ideia maluca”, conta Lola. O meteorologista não sabia por onde começar, mas estudou as fotos que Meir lhe mandou de um experimento similar, o Seca Floresta, que estava sendo montado na Floresta Nacional do Tapajós, no oeste do estado, e saiu a campo. “Em um ano estava feito.” Não era um feito logístico trivial. Chegar a Caxiuanã envolve sair de Belém e passar 12 horas a bordo de um barco repleto de redes coloridas apinhadas, até Breves. Foi nessa cidade de cerca de 100 mil habitantes que Lola conseguiu o material para sua empreitada, como os tubos de ferro galvanizado para montar duas torres com 40 m de altura. De lá, 10 horas em um barco menor levam a Caxiuanã, onde o material precisou ser carregado pelo meio da densa floresta.

O experimento conhecido como Esecaflor, abreviação de Efeitos da Seca da Floresta, é o mais extenso e mais duradouro no mundo a avaliar o efeito de seca numa floresta tropical. O único comparável é o Seca Floresta, que abrangeu uma área similar e foi encerrado após cinco anos (ver Pesquisa FAPESP nº 156). Nesta última década e meia, Antonio Carlos Lola tem sido o principal responsável por monitorar a reação da floresta e manter o experimento de pé mesmo quando ele é constantemente derrubado por galhos e árvores que caem, uma empreitada que exige entre R$ 10 mil e R$ 15 mil por mês. Um valor que tende a subir, agora que mais árvores têm sucumbido à seca, destruindo parte da estrutura. “Passo por volta de seis meses do ano no meio do mato, com interrupções”, conta ele, que tem coordenado uma série de projetos de alunos de mestrado e doutorado no âmbito do experimento.

016-021_Amazonia_238

Observação prolongada
Em linhas gerais os resultados dos dois experimentos amazônicos contam histórias semelhantes, como mostra artigo de revisão publicado por Meir e colegas em setembro na revista BioScience: nos primeiros anos a floresta parece ignorar a falta de chuva e mantém o funcionamento normal. Passados alguns anos de seca, porém, galhos começam a cair e árvores a morrer, sobretudo as mais altas e as menores. Experimentos em outros países analisaram uma área menor ou duraram menos tempo – o maior, na Indonésia, funcionou por dois anos.

Fogo experimental no Mato Grosso: em condições normais de umidade, os incêndios têm baixa energia e são pouco destrutivos

O estudo de Caxiuanã traz resultados inéditos por sua longa duração: o colapso das maiores árvores só aconteceu após 13 anos da seca experimental e pode representar um ponto de inflexão em que a floresta muda de cara. Desde 2001 os pesquisadores vêm fazendo medições fisiológicas nas árvores, comparando a área com restrição de chuva e uma parcela semelhante sem intervenção. Nos últimos dois anos, começaram a registrar uma mortalidade drástica entre as árvores mais altas, raras por natureza, que caem causando destruição e transformando a floresta pujante numa mata de aparência degradada. “Das 12 árvores mais altas com diâmetro maior que 60 centímetros, restam apenas três”, conta Lucy Rowland, pesquisadora britânica em estágio de pós-doutorado no grupo de Meir na Universidade de Edimburgo que está à frente do projeto desde 2011. A surpresa foi identificar no sistema hidráulico a causa interna dessa mortalidade. Quando o suprimento de água no solo é reduzido, aumenta a tensão na coluna d’água no interior dos vasos condutores das árvores, o xilema. A integridade dessa coluna, que depende da adesão natural entre as moléculas de água, acaba comprometida por bolhas de ar, um processo que os especialistas chamam de cavitação. A consequência desse colapso, que acontece de repente, é a incapacidade de levar água das raízes às folhas e a morte súbita da árvore. Meir ressalta que essa falha hidráulica funciona como um gatilho que inicia o processo de morte, sem ser necessariamente a causa final – ainda desconhecida.

Outra hipótese favorecida para explicar a morte de árvores em situações de seca é o que os pesquisadores chamam de “fome de carbono”. Quando as folhas fecham os estômatos (poros que permitem transpiração e trocas gasosas) para evitar o ressecamento, também reduzem a absorção de carbono. O mais provável é que os dois processos aconteçam simultaneamente, mas no caso de Caxiuanã os pesquisadores descartaram a falta de carbono como fator principal ao verificar que as árvores continham um suprimento normal desse elemento e não pararam de crescer até a morte.

“Medimos a vulnerabilidade do sistema hidráulico das plantas à cavitação e vimos que ela tem relação com o diâmetro da árvore”, conta o biólogo Rafael Oliveira, da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), colaborador do projeto há dois anos. A observação condiz com a preponderância de vítimas avantajadas: 15 árvores com diâmetro maior que 40 centímetros caíram na área experimental, em comparação com apenas uma ou duas na zona de controle, onde não há exclusão de chuva. O impacto é grande, porque essas árvores gigantescas concentram uma parcela importante da biomassa da floresta e do dossel emissor de umidade. Enquanto isso, as de tamanho médio estão crescendo até mais, graças à luz que chega até elas agora que a mata vai se tornando esparsa e cheia de frestas entre as copas.

Painéis de plástico impedem que metade da chuva chegue ao chão...

Oliveira tem estudado as relações entre o solo, as plantas e a atmosfera, e em uma revisão publicada em 2014 na revista Theoretical and Experimental Plant Physiology mostrou que mudanças no regime de precipitação podem causar um estresse hídrico letal por cavitação, mesmo que a seca seja compensada por um período de chuvas intensas, de maneira que o total anual de chuvas não se altere. Para ele, é preciso entender melhor o funcionamento fisiológico e anatômico das árvores nessas condições para prever sua reação às mudanças previstas no clima. Essas particularidades também devem explicar por que a reação varia entre espécies. O estudo de Caxiuanã, por exemplo, aponta o gênero Pouteria como muito vulnerável à seca e o Licania como o mais resistente, entre as árvores examinadas. Os mecanismos usados pelas plantas são diversos, como absorver água pela parte aérea – pelas folhas e até pelos ramos e tronco. “Precisamos ver quais árvores na Amazônia fazem isso”, planeja.

Outro efeito da mortalidade das árvores é o acúmulo de mais folhas e galhos no solo da floresta. “Quem trabalha com fogo chama essa camada de combustível”, brinca o ecólogo Paulo Brando, pesquisador do Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia (Ipam) e do Centro de Pesquisa Woods Hole, Estados Unidos. Um dos integrantes do Seca Floresta, cujo imenso banco de dados ainda está em análise quase 10 anos depois de encerrado o projeto, ele mais recentemente conduziu um estudo com incêndios florestais num experimento no Alto Xingu, a região mais seca da Amazônia. Segundo os resultados apresentados em artigo de 2014 na PNAS, as árvores resistiram bem à primeira queimada, em 2004, em parte porque a própria umidade da floresta impediu que o fogo atingisse proporções devastadoras. O resultado marcante veio em 2007, quando o incêndio programado coincidiu com uma seca acentuada e representou, na interpretação dos autores, um ponto de inflexão na floresta. “O que vimos foi fogo de grande intensidade que matou tudo, principalmente as árvores pequenas”, conta, concluindo que a interação entre seca e fogo potencializa as forças motrizes de degradação. Menos água no solo, menos umidade no ar e mais combustível no chão agem em conjunto e aumentam muito a probabilidade de fogo. E não se pode esquecer a ação humana nas fronteiras agrícolas, onde o fogo é comum para manejo e se soma aos efeitos do desmatamento, que criam ilhas de floresta com bordas vulneráveis. “A fronteira da floresta com uma plantação de soja, por exemplo, é 5 graus Celsius mais quente do que o interior da floresta, e mais seca”, diz Brando.

...provocando queda de árvores...

Ele é coautor de um estudo feito pela geógrafa Ane Alencar, também do Ipam, que analisou registros de incêndios na Amazônia, por imagens de satélite, entre 1983 e 2007. Os resultados, publicados em setembro na Ecological Applications, mostram que já houve um aumento na ocorrência de fogo florestal em resposta a um clima mais seco. Comparando três tipos de mata no leste da Amazônia, o grupo verificou que a floresta densa é sensível a mudanças climáticas, enquanto as formações aberta e de transição estão mais sujeitas à ação humana por desmatamento.

Futuro
Como não há bola de cristal para enxergar o que vem à frente, vários grupos buscam desenvolver modelos climáticos e ecológicos. Brando participou de um estudo liderado por Philip Duffy, do Woods Hole, que comparou a capacidade de modelos climáticos acomodarem as secas que aconteceram em 2005 e 2010 na Amazônia, tão drásticas que não era esperado que se repetissem num período menor do que um século. Os resultados, publicados em outubro no site da PNAS, preveem um aumento significativo de secas, com um crescimento da área afetada por essas secas na região amazônica. O problema, segundo Brando, é que boa parte dos modelos lida com médias, e o que está em questão são extremos climáticos. Este ano, caracterizado por um fenômeno El Niño mais forte do que a média, a equipe do Esecaflor encontrou, em novembro, uma floresta praticamente sem chuva havia mais de dois meses. A expectativa é, nos próximos anos, acompanhar as consequências desse período.

...calhas levam a água embora numa área de 1 hectare da Floresta Nacional de Caxiuanã

“O relatório de 2013 do IPCC ressaltou nossa falta de capacidade em prever a mortalidade relacionada à seca nas florestas como uma das incertezas na ciência ligada à vegetação e ao clima”, conta Meir. “Nossos resultados indicam qual mecanismo fisiológico precisa ser bem representado pelos modelos para prever a mortalidade das árvores”, explica. Nessa busca por reduzir incertezas e antecipar o futuro, Lucy – que é especialista em usar dados de campo para alimentar modelos – vem trabalhando em parceria com o grupo de Stephen Sitch, na Universidade de Exeter, na Inglaterra, para aprimorar a representação das respostas das florestas tropicais à seca no modelo de vegetação conhecido como Jules. A Amazônia fala claramente sobre a importância de políticas que busquem reduzir as mudanças climáticas, tema que inundou as notícias nos últimos tempos por causa da Conferência do Clima em Paris (COP21), que ocorreu este mês. Os experimentos mostram efeitos localizados, mas secas naturais como as da década passada podem afetar uma área extensa da floresta. Meir ressalta a necessidade de quebrar o ciclo: ao se decomporem, imensas árvores mortas liberam na atmosfera uma quantidade de carbono que tende a agravar o efeito estufa. “É possível desenvolver regras de energia e uso da terra que sejam economicamente benéficas, sem danificar o ambiente no longo prazo”, completa.

Veja mais fotos da pesquisa na Galeria de Imagens

Projeto
Interações entre solo-vegetação-atmosfera em uma paisagem tropical em transformação (n° 2011/52072-0); Modalidade Pesquisa em Parceria para Inovação Tecnológica (Pite) e Acordo FAPESP-Microsoft Research; Pesquisador responsávelRafael Silva Oliveira (IB-Unicamp); Investimento R$ 1.082.525,94.

Artigos científicos
ALENCAR, A. A. et al. Landscape fragmentation, severe drought, and the new Amazon forest fire regimeEcological Applications. v. 25, n. 6, p. 1493-505. set. 2015.
BRANDO, P. M. et al. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought-fire interactionsPNAS. v. 111, n. 17, p. 6347-52. 29 abr. 2014.
DUFFY, P. B. et alProjections of future meteorological drought and wet periods in the AmazonPNAS. on-line. 12 out. 2015.
MEIR, P. et alThreshold responses to soil moisture deficit by trees and soil in tropical rain forests: insights from field experimentsBioScience. v. 65, n. 9, p. 882-92. set. 2015.
OLIVEIRA, R. S. et alChanging precipitation regimes and the water and carbon economies of treesTheoretical and Experimental Plant Physiology. v. 26, n. 1, p. 65-82. mar. 2014.
ROWLAND, L. et alDeath from drought in tropical forests is triggered by hydraulics not carbon starvationNature. on-line. 23 nov. 2015.

Pecuária é responsável por 15% dos gases do efeito estufa (O Globo)

Renato Grandelle, 24/11/2015

Desmatamento na Região de Xapuri no Acre – Gustavo Stephan/ 05-12-2013

RIO— Parte expressiva da liberação de carbono na atmosfera fica bem longe da fumaça liberada por usinas ou carros. Um novo estudo do Chatham House, o Real Instituto de Relações Internacionais do Reino Unido, indica que cerca de 15% dos poluentes que levam ao aquecimento global são provenientes da pecuária — seja pelo metano da digestão e estrume dos animais, ou pela produção de culturas para alimentação. De acordo com o relatório “Mudanças climáticas, mudanças na alimentação”, reduzir a quantidade de carne no prato é fundamental para assegurar que a temperatura global não avance mais do que 2 graus Celsius neste século.

O planeta, porém, ignora a recomendação. Estima-se que, com o aumento da classe média nos países em desenvolvimento — especialmente na China e no Brasil —, o consumo de carne crescerá até 76% nos próximos 35 anos.

Mudar a alimentação pode cortar pela metade os custos das futuras medidas contra o aquecimento global. E o clima não será a única área favorecida pela nova dieta. Coautora do estudo, Laura Wellesley ressalta que conter o consumo exagerado de carne também traz benefícios imediatos à saúde.

— Não estamos sugerindo que todo mundo deve se tornar vegetariano. A carne, consumida com moderação, pode fazer parte de uma dieta saudável para o indivíduo e o meio ambiente — ressalta. — De acordo com a Escola de Medicina de Harvard, a porção diária não deve ultrapassar 70 gramas, que é um hambúrguer de tamanho médio. Se nada for feito para nos limitarmos a este valor, os padrões alimentares atuais serão incompatíveis com o aumento de temperatura de apenas 2 graus Celsius.

DIETA SAUDÁVEL FORA DA COP-21

Atualmente, o consumo dos brasileiros é de duas vezes e meia a quantidade diária recomendada; nos EUA, é de três vezes mais. Um estudo divulgado em outubro pela Organização Mundial de Saúde alertou que a ingestão exagerada de carnes vermelhas e processadas pode levar à ocorrência de doenças não transmissíveis, principalmente o câncer.

— Mudanças de alimentação devem estar no topo da lista das discussões na Conferência do Clima de Paris (COP-21). É uma estratégia rápida e econômica para conter as emissões de gases-estufa — avalia Laura.

Ainda assim, o debate sobre a dieta mundial deve ficar fora da mesa de negociações da COP-21. Para os pesquisadores do Chatham House, os governos temem que campanhas reivindicando limitações ao consumo de carne desagradem a opinião pública e a indústria de alimentos.

Desde o início do ano, cerca de 150 países apresentaram à ONU metas voluntárias para cortar a emissão de gases de efeito estufa. A diminuição do consumo de carne não foi mencionada em nenhum projeto.

— Como são cautelosos em assumir um risco, os governos têm favorecido a inércia e permanecem em silêncio sobre a questão das dietas sustentáveis — lamenta Laura. — As pesquisas revelam que inicialmente muitas pessoas não gostam da ideia de comer menos carne, e por isso são resistentes à ideia de intervenção do poder público. No entanto, depois que são informadas sobre a relação entre dieta e clima, a maioria recomenda que o governo promova intervenções e forneça orientações e incentivos para a mudança na alimentação.

No Brasil, diz o levantamento, a população sente orgulho da pecuária, mas demonstra preocupação com sua potencial expansão desordenada para a Floresta Amazônica. A pecuária é uma das atividades econômicas mais importantes do país — representa 6,8% do PIB —, mas também corresponde a uma das mais ineficientes do mundo, já que é baseada na prática extensiva. Os lucros estão no tamanho da área usada, e não na eficiência produtiva. No Cerrado há, em média, apenas 1 boi por hectare — estima-se que é possível triplicar esta ocupação sem qualquer comprometimento dos rendimentos do setor.

A força econômica da pecuária e o hábito do consumo exagerado de carne — a “tradição do churrasco de fim de semana”, como destaca o Chatham House — são os maiores obstáculos para que o governo federal desenvolva projetos que promovam a alimentação saudável e, ao mesmo tempo, aumente o alerta da população contra as mudanças climáticas. O brasileiro é conhecido como um dos povos mais preocupados no mundo com o aquecimento global, mas nunca foi informado sobre sua ligação com mudanças na dieta.

Populações pré-colombianas afetavam pouco a Amazônia, diz estudo (Estado de São Paulo)

Fábio de Castro

28 de outubro de 2015

Antes da chegada dos Europeus às Américas, uma grande população indígena habitava a Amazônia. Mas, ao contrário do que sustentam alguns cientistas, os impactos dessa ocupação humana sobre a floresta eram extremamente pequenos, segundo um novo estudo internacional realizado com participação brasileira.

pesquisa, publicada nesta quarta-feira, 28, na revista científica Journal of Biogeography, foi liderada por cientistas do Instituto de Tecnologia da Flórida, nos Estados Unidos e teve a participação de Carlos Peres, pesquisador do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi.

Imagem de satélite da Amazônia ocidental mostra mendros de rios com 'braços-mortos', onde viviam grandes populações antes da chegada dos europeus; o novo estudo mostra que o impacto desses povos na floresta era menor do que se pensava

Imagem de satélite da Amazônia ocidental mostra mendros de rios com ‘braços-mortos’, onde viviam grandes populações antes da chegada dos europeus; o novo estudo mostra que o impacto desses povos na floresta era menor do que se pensava

Segundo o novo estudo, as populações amazônicas pré-colombianas viviam em densos assentamentos perto dos rios, afetando profundamente essas áreas. Mas os impactos que elas produziam na floresta eram limitados a uma distância de um dia de caminhada a partir das margens – deixando intocada a maior parte da Bacia Amazônica.

A pesquisa foi realizada com o uso de plantas fósseis, estimativas de densidade de mamíferos, sensoriamento remoto e modelagens computacionais de populações humanas. Segundo os autores, os resultados indicam que as florestas amazônicas podem ser muito vulneráveis às perturbações provocadas por atividades madeireiras e de mineração.

O novo estudo refuta uma teoria emergente, sustentada por alguns arqueólogos e antropólogos, de que as florestas da Amazônia são resultado de modificações da paisagem produzidas por populações ancestrais. Essa teoria contradiz a noção de que as florestas são ecossistemas frágeis.

“Ninguém duvida da importância da ação humana ao longo das principais vias fluviais. Mas, na Amazônia ocidental, ainda não se sabe se os humanos tiveram sobre o ecossistema um impacto maior que qualquer outro grande mamífero”, disse o autor principal do estudo, Mark Bush, do Instituto de Tecnologia da Flórida.

Dolores Piperno, outra autora do estudo, arqueóloga do Museu Americano de História Natural, afirma que há exagero na ideia de que a Amazônia é uma paisagem fabricada e domesticada. “Estudos anteriores se basearam em poucos sítios arqueológicos próximos aos cursos de água, e extrapolaram os efeitos da ocupação humana pré-histórica para todo o bioma. Mas a Amazônia é heterogênea e essas extrapolações precisam ser revistas com dados empíricos”, disse ela.

“Esse não é apenas um debate sobre o que ocorreu há 500 anos, ele tem implicações muito relevantes para a sociedade moderna e para as iniciativas de conservação”, afirmou Bush.

De acordo com Bush, se as florestas tivessem sido pesadamente modificadas antes da chegada dos Europeus e tivessem se recuperado no período de uma só geração de árvores para adquirir um nível tão vasto de biodiversidade, essa capacidade de recuperação rápida poderia ser usada como justificativa para uma atividade madeireira agressiva.

Entretanto, se a influência dos humanos foi muito limitada, como mostra o novo estudo, a atividade madeireira e mineradora têm potencial para provocar na floresta consequências de longo prazo, possivelmente irreversíveis.

“Essa distinção se torna cada vez mais importante, à medida em que os gestores decidem se irão reforçar ou flexibilizar a proteção de áreas já designadas como parques de conservação”, afirmou Bush.

Aquecimento pode triplicar seca na Amazônia (Observatório do Clima)

15/10/2015

 Seca em Silves (AM) em 2005. Foto: Ana Cintia Gazzelli/WWF

Seca em Silves (AM) em 2005. Foto: Ana Cintia Gazzelli/WWF

Modelos de computador sugerem que leste amazônico, que contém a maior parte da floresta, teria mais estiagens, incêndios e morte de árvores, enquanto o oeste ficaria mais chuvoso.

As mudanças climáticas podem aumentar a frequência tanto de secas quanto de chuvas extremas na Amazônia antes do meio do século, compondo com o desmatamento para causar mortes maciças de árvores, incêndios e emissões de carbono. A conclusão é de uma avaliação de 35 modelos climáticos aplicados à região, feita por pesquisadores dos EUA e do Brasil.

Segundo o estudo, liderado por Philip Duffy, do WHRC (Instituto de Pesquisas de Woods Hole, nos EUA) e da Universidade Stanford, a área afetada por secas extremas no leste amazônico, região que engloba a maior parte da Amazônia, pode triplicar até 2100. Paradoxalmente, a frequência de períodos extremamente chuvosos e a área sujeita a chuvas extremas tende a crescer em toda a região após 2040 – mesmo nos locais onde a precipitação média anual diminuir.

Já o oeste amazônico, em especial o Peru e a Colômbia, deve ter um aumento na precipitação média anual.

A mudança no regime de chuvas é um efeito há muito teorizado do aquecimento global. Com mais energia na atmosfera e mais vapor d’água, resultante da maior evaporação dos oceanos, a tendência é que os extremos climáticos sejam amplificados. As estações chuvosas – na Amazônia, o período de verão no hemisfério sul, chamado pelos moradores da região de “inverno” ficam mais curtas, mas as chuvas caem com mais intensidade.

No entanto, a resposta da floresta essas mudanças tem sido objeto de controvérsias entre os cientistas. Estudos da década de 1990 propuseram que a reação da Amazônia fosse ser uma ampla “savanização”, ou mortandade de grandes árvores, e a transformação de vastas porções da selva numa savana empobrecida.

Outros estudos, porém, apontaram que o calor e o CO2 extra teriam o efeito oposto – o de fazer as árvores crescerem mais e fixarem mais carbono, de modo a compensar eventuais perdas por seca. Na média, portanto, o impacto do aquecimento global sobre a Amazônia seria relativamente pequeno.

Ocorre que a própria Amazônia encarregou-se de dar aos cientistas dicas de como reagiria. Em 2005, 2007 e 2010, a floresta passou por secas históricas. O resultado foi ampla mortalidade de árvores e incêndios em florestas primárias em mais de 85 mil quilômetros quadrados. O grupo de Duffy, também integrado por Paulo Brando, do Ipam (Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia), aponta que de 1% a 2% do carbono da Amazônia foi lançado na atmosfera em decorrência das secas da década de 2000. Brando e colegas do Ipam também já haviam mostrado que a Amazônia está mais inflamável, provavelmente devido aos efeitos combinados do clima e do desmatamento.

Os pesquisadores simularam o clima futuro da região usando os modelos do chamado projeto CMIP5, usado pelo IPCC (Painel Intergovernamental sobre Mudança Climática) no seu último relatório de avaliação do clima global. Um dos membros do grupo, Chris Field, de Stanford, foi um dos coordenadores do relatório – foi também candidato à presidência do IPCC na eleição realizada na semana passada, perdendo para o coreano Hoesung Lee.

Os modelos de computador foram testados no pior cenário de emissões, o chamado RMP 8.5, no qual se assume que pouca coisa será feita para controlar emissões de gases-estufa.

Eles não apenas captaram bem a influência das temperaturas dos oceanos Atlântico e Pacífico sobre o padrão de chuvas na Amazônia – diferenças entre os dois oceanos explicam por que o leste amazônico ficará mais seco e o oeste, mais úmido –, como também mostraram nas simulações de seca futura uma característica das secas recorde de 2005 e 2010: o extremo norte da Amazônia teve grande aumento de chuvas enquanto o centro e o sul estorricavam.

Segundo os pesquisadores, o estudo pode ser até mesmo conservador, já que só levou em conta as variações de precipitação. “Por exemplo, as chuvas no leste da Amazônia têm uma forte dependência da evapotranspiração, então uma redução na cobertura de árvores poderia reduzir a precipitação”, escreveram Duffy e Brando. “Isso sugere que, se os processos relacionados a mudanças no uso da terra fossem mais bem representados nos modelos do CMIP5, a intensidade das secas poderia ser maior do que a projetada aqui.”

O estudo foi publicado na PNAS, a revista da Academia Nacional de Ciências dos EUA. (Observatório do Clima/ #Envolverde)

* Publicado originalmente no site Observatório do Clima.

Ibama nega licença de operação a Belo Monte (Estadão)

ANDRÉ BORGES – O ESTADO DE S. PAULO

22 Setembro 2015 | 20h 24

Sem a autorização, a usina fica impedida de encher o reservatório para começar a gerar energia; instituto lista 12 exigências que não foram atendidas pela concessionária.

Hidrelétrica de Belo MonteHidrelétrica de Belo Monte

Atualizado às 23h00

O Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis (Ibama) negou o pedido da concessionária Norte Energia para emissão da licença de operação da hidrelétrica de Belo Monte, em construção no Pará. Sem a licença, a usina fica impedida de encher o seu reservatório e, consequentemente, de iniciar a geração de energia.

Na noite desta terça-feira, a Norte Energia, por sua vez, declarou que o parecer do Ibama não é uma “negativa de seu pedido” e sim um prazo para que a concessionária “faça a comprovação das ações compensatórias”. Essa comprovação, segundo a empresa, será dada ainda nesta semana.

Após análise criteriosa das condicionantes socioambientais que teriam de ser cumpridas pela Norte Energia, o Ibama concluiu que foram constatadas “pendências impeditivas” para a liberação da licença. Em despacho encaminhado hoje à diretoria da concessionária, o diretor de licenciamento do Ibama, Thomaz Miazaki, elencou 12 itens que não foram atendidos pela empresa.

“Diante da análise apresentada no referido Parecer Técnico, bem como do histórico de acompanhamento da equipe de licenciamento ambiental da UHE Belo Monte, informo que foram constatadas pendências impeditivas à emissão da Licença de Operação para o empreendimento”, declara Miazaki.

Para liberar o empreendimento, o Ibama exige o cumprimento de uma série de empreendimentos. Na área logística, afirma que é preciso que sejam concluídas obras de recomposição das 12 interferências em acessos existentes na região, além da implantação das oito pontes e duas passarelas previstas para adequação do sistema viário de Altamira, município mais afetado pela usina.

O órgão pede a conclusão das obras de saneamento nas vilas “Ressaca” e “Garimpo do Galo”, a comprovação de que o sistema de abastecimento de água (captação superficial) nas localidades em vilas próximas à usina encontra-se em operação para atendimento da população local e apresentação de cronograma e metas para operação do sistema de esgotamento sanitário de Altamira. “As metas deverão considerar os dados da modelagem matemática de qualidade da água dos Igarapés de Altamira apresentada pela Norte Energia”, declara o Ibama.

Os atrasos em reassentamentos também foram destacados pelo instituto. O órgão pede a conclusão do remanejamento da população atingida diretamente pela usina, especialmente aquelas localizadas na área urbana de Altamira, além dos ribeirinhos moradores de ilhas e “beiradões” do rio Xingu. É cobrado o cronograma para conclusão da implantação da infraestrutura prevista para o reassentamentos urbanos coletivos (RUCs). O mesmo vale para moradores da área rural.

A Norte Energia terá que concluir a execução do projeto de “demolição e desinfecção de estruturas e edificações” na região atingida pelo reservatório e apresentar planejamento para o “cenário de necessidade de tratamento das famílias que, embora localizadas fora da área diretamente atingida, poderão sofrer eventuais impactos decorrentes da elevação do lençol freático em áreas urbanas de Altamira, após a configuração final do reservatório Xingu”.

Finalmente, a empresa terá que concluir as metas de corte e limpeza de vegetação definidas no “plano de enchimento”. Todas as exigências deverão ser alimentadas com registros fotográficos e demais documentos.