Arquivo da categoria: Uncategorized

The deep Anthropocene (AEON)

aeon-co.cdn.ampproject.org

Lucas Stephens, Erle Ellis & Dorian Fuller – 1 October 2020

A revolution in archaeology has exposed the extraordinary extent of human influence over our planet’s past and its future
Photo by Catalina Martin-Chico/Panos Pictures

Lucas Stephens is a senior research analyst at the Environmental Law and Policy Center in Chicago. He was a specialist researcher at the ArchaeoGLOBE project.

Erle Ellis is a professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He is a member of the Anthropocene Working Group, a fellow of the Global Land Programme, a senior fellow of the Breakthrough Institute, and an advisor to the Nature Needs Half movement. He is the author of Anthropocene: A Very Short Introduction (2018).

Dorian Fuller is professor of archaeobotany at University College London.

Edited by Sally Davies


Humanity’s transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture is one of the most important developments in human and Earth history. Human societies, plant and animal populations, the makeup of the atmosphere, even the Earth’s surface – all were irreversibly transformed.

When asked about this transition, some people might be able to name the Neolithic Revolution or point to the Fertile Crescent on a map. This widespread understanding is the product of years of toil by archaeologists, who diligently unearthed the sickles, grinding stones and storage vessels that spoke to the birth of new technologies for growing crops and domesticating animals. The story they constructed went something like this: beginning in the Near East some 11,000 years ago, humans discovered how to control the reproduction of wheat and barley, which precipitated a rapid switch to farming. Within 500 to 1,000 years, a scattering of small farming villages sprang up, each with several hundred inhabitants eating bread, chickpeas and lentils, soon also herding sheep and goats in the hills, some keeping cattle.

This sedentary lifestyle spread, as farmers migrated from the Fertile Crescent through Turkey and, from there, over the Bosporus and across the Mediterranean into Europe. They moved east from Iran into South Asia and the Indian subcontinent, and south from the Levant into eastern Africa. As farmers and herders populated new areas, they cleared forests to make fields and brought their animals with them, forever changing local environments. Over time, agricultural advances allowed ever larger and denser settlements to flourish, eventually giving rise to cities and civilisations, such as those in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus and later others throughout the Mediterranean and elsewhere.

For many decades, the study of early agriculture centred on only a few other regions apart from the Fertile Crescent. In China, millet, rice and pigs gave rise to the first Chinese cities and dynasties. In southern Mexico, it was maize, squash and beans that were first cultivated and supported later civilisations such as the Olmecs or the Puebloans of the American Southwest. In Peru, native potato, quinoa and llamas were among species domesticated by 5,000 years ago that made later civilisations in the Andes possible. In each of these regions, the transition to agriculture set off trends of rising human populations and growing settlements that required increasing amounts of wood, clay and other raw materials from the surrounding environments.

Yet for all its sweep and influence, this picture of the spread of agriculture is incomplete. New technologies have changed how archaeology is practised, from the way we examine ancient food scraps at a molecular level, to the use of satellite photography to trace patterns of irrigation across entire landscapes. Recent discoveries are expanding our awareness of just how early, extensive and transformative humans’ use of land has been. The rise of agriculture was not a ‘point in time’ revolution that occurred only in a few regions, but rather a pervasive, socioecological shifting back and forth across fuzzy thresholds in many locations.

Bringing together the collective knowledge of more than 250 archaeologists, the ArchaeoGLOBE project in which we participated is the first global, crowdsourced database of archaeological expertise on land use over the past 10,000 years. It tells a completely different story of Earth’s transformation than is commonly acknowledged in the natural sciences. ArchaeoGLOBE reveals that human societies modified most of Earth’s biosphere much earlier and more profoundly than we thought – an insight that has serious implications for how we understand humanity’s relationship to nature and the planet as a whole.

Just as recent archaeological research has challenged old definitions of agriculture and blurred the lines between farmers and hunter-gatherers, it’s also leading us to rethink what nature means and where it is. The deep roots of how humanity transformed the globe pose a challenge to the emerging Anthropocene paradigm, in which human-caused environmental change is typically seen as a 20th-century or industrial-era phenomenon. Instead, it’s clearer than ever before that most places we think of as ‘pristine’ or ‘untouched’ have long relied on human societies to fill crucial ecological roles. As a consequence, trying to disentangle ‘natural’ ecosystems from those that people have managed for millennia is becoming less and less realistic, let alone desirable.

Our understanding of early agriculture derives mostly from the material remains of food – seeds, other plant remains and animal bones. Archaeologists traditionally document these finds from excavated sites and use them to track the dates and distribution of different people and practices. Over the past several decades, though, practitioners have become more skilled at spotting the earliest signatures of domestication, relying on cutting-edge advances in chemistry, biology, imaging and computer science.

Archaeologists have greatly improved their capacity to trace the evolution of crops, thanks to advances in our capacity to recover minute plant remains – from silica microfossils to attachment scars of cereals, where the seeds attach to the rest of the plant. Along with early crops, agricultural weeds and storage pests such as mice and weevils also appeared. Increasingly, we can identify a broader biotic community that emerged around the first villages and spread with agriculture. For example, weeds that originated in the Fertile Crescent alongside early wheat and barley crops also show up in the earliest agricultural communities in places such as Germany and Pakistan.

Collections of animal bones provide evidence of how herded creatures changed physically through the process of domestication. Butchering marks on bones can help reconstruct culling strategies. From the ages and sizes of animals, archaeologists can deduce the populations of herds in terms of age and sex ratios, all of which reveals how herding differed from hunting. Herding systems themselves also vary, with some focused only on producing meat, and others on milk and wool too.

The British Isles were transformed by imported crops, weeds and livestock from millennia earlier

Measurements of bones and seeds have made great strides with technologies such as geometric morphometrics – complex mathematical shape analysis that allows for a more nuanced understanding of how varieties evolved and moved between regions. Biomolecular methods have also multiplied. The recovery of amino acid profiles from fragmented animal bones, for example, has allowed us to discern which animals they came from, even when they’re too degraded for visual identification. The increasingly sophisticated use and analysis of ancient DNA now allows researchers to track the development and distribution of domesticated animals and crops in great detail.

Archaeologists have also used mass spectrometry, a technique involving gas ions, to pinpoint which species were cooked together based on the presence of biomolecules such as lipids. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen from animal bones and seeds give insight into where and how plants and animals were managed – allowing us to more fully sketch out ancient foodwebs from soil conditions to human consumption. Strontium isotopes in human and animal bones, meanwhile, allow us to identify migrations across a single organism’s lifetime, revealing more and earlier long-distance interconnections than previously imagined. Radiocarbon dating was already possible in the 1950s – but recent improvements that have reduced sample sizes and error margins allow us to build fine-grained chronologies and directly date individual crops.

With all these fresh data, it’s now possible to tell a much richer, more diverse story about the gradual evolutions and dispersals of early agriculture. By 6,000 years ago, the British Isles were being transformed by an imported collection of crops, weeds and livestock that had originated millennia earlier in the Near East. Similarly, millet, rice and pigs from central China had been spread as far as Thailand by 4,000 years ago, and began transforming much of the region’s tropical woodland to agricultural fields. New stories are constantly emerging too – including that sorghum, a grain crop, was domesticated in the savannahs of eastern Sudan more than 5,000 years ago, before the arrival of domesticated sheep or goats in that area. Once combined with Near Eastern sheep, goats and cattle, agropastoralism spread rapidly throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa by 2,000 years ago.

Advances in the study of plant silica micro-fossils (phytoliths) have helped trace banana cultivation from the Island of New Guinea more than 7,000 years ago – from where it spread through Island Southeast Asia, and eventually across the Indian Ocean to Africa, more than a millennium before Vasco da Gama navigated from Africa to India. These techniques have also revealed unforeseen agricultural origins – such as the forgotten cereal, browntop millet. It was the first staple crop of South India, before it was largely replaced by crops such as sorghum that were translocated from Africa. Many people might be surprised to learn that the early farming tradition in the Mississippi basin relied on pitseed goosefoot, erect knotweed and marsh elder some 3,000-4,000 years ago, long before maize agriculture arrived in the American Midwest.

Archaeologists don’t just study materials painstakingly uncovered in excavations. They also examine landscapes, patterns of settlement, and the built infrastructure of past societies to get a sense of the accumulated changes that humans have made to our environments. They have developed a repertoire of techniques that allow them to study the traces of ancient people on scales much larger than an individual site: from simply walking and documenting the density of broken pottery on the ground, to examining satellite imagery, using lidar (light and laser) and drones to build 3D models, even searching for subsurface magnetic anomalies to plot out the walls of buried cities.

There was usually a long continuum of exploitation, translocation and management of ecosystems

As a result, new revelations about our deep past are constantly emerging. Recent discoveries in southwestern Amazonia showed that people were cultivating squash and manioc more than 10,000 years ago, and maize only a few thousand years later. They did so living in an engineered landscape consisting of thousands of artificial forested islands, within a seasonally flooded savannah.

Some of the most stunning discoveries have come from the application of lidar around Maya cities, buried underneath the tropical canopy in Central America. Lasers can penetrate this canopy to define the shapes of mounds, plazas, ceremonial platforms and long causeways that were previously indistinguishable from the topography of the jungle. A recent example in Mexico pushed back the time period for monumental construction to what we used to consider the very beginning of Maya civilisation – 3,000 years ago – and suggests the monuments were more widespread than previously believed.

These transitions were not linear or absolute. It’s now clear that there was usually a long continuum of exploitation, translocation and management of plants, animals, landforms and ecosystems well before (and often after) domestication occurred. This makes it harder to draw solid lines between hunter-gatherer and farmer societies, or between societies who practised different subsistence strategies. Over archaeological timescales spanning hundreds to thousands of years, land use can be thought of instead as a tapestry of ever-evolving anthroecosystems with higher or lower degrees of transformation – more or less human-shaped, or ‘domesticated’ environments.

In 2003, the climatologist William Ruddiman introduced the ‘early anthropogenic hypothesis’: the idea that agricultural land use began warming Earth’s climate thousands of years ago. While some aspects of this early global climate change remain unsettled among scientists, there’s strong consensus that land-use change was the greatest driver of global climate change until the 1950s, and remains a major driver of climate change today. As a result, global maps of historical changes in land use, and their effects on vegetation cover, soils and greenhouse gas emissions, are a critical component of all contemporary models for forecasting Earth’s future climate.

Deforestation, tilling the land and other agricultural practices alter regional and global climate because they release greenhouse gases from vegetation and soils, as well as altering the exchange of heat and moisture across Earth. These effects reverse when land is abandoned and vegetation recovers or is restored. Early changes in agricultural land use therefore have major implications in understanding climate changes of the past, present and future.

The main global map of historical land use deployed in climate models is HYDE (the History Database of the Global Environment), combining contemporary and historical patterns of land use and population across the planet over the past 12,000 years. Despite this huge span of space and time, with notable exceptions, HYDE is based largely on historical census data that go back to 1960, mostly from Europe.

HYDE’s creator, a collaborator in ArchaeoGLOBE, has long requested help from historians, scientists and archaeologists to build a stronger empirical basis for HYDE’s global maps – especially for the deep past, where data are especially lacking. The data needed to improve the HYDE database exist, but reside in a format that’s difficult to access – the expert knowledge of archaeologists working in sites and regions around the world. The problem is that no single archaeologist has the breadth or time-depth of knowledge required.

Archaeologists typically study individual regions and time periods, and have only background knowledge on wider areas. Research methods and terminology also aren’t standardised worldwide, making syntheses difficult, rare and subjective. To construct a comprehensive global database of past land use, you need to gather information from hundreds of regional specialists and collate it, allowing this mosaic of individual studies to emerge as a single picture. This was exactly what we did for ArchaeoGLOBE.

Earth’s terrestrial ecology was already largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists

In 2018, we surveyed more than 1,300 archaeologists around the world, and synthesised their responses into ArchaeoGLOBE. The format of our questionnaire was based on 10 time-slices from history (from 10,000 years ago, roughly the beginning of agriculture, to 1850 CE, the industrial era in Europe); 146 geographic regions; four levels of land-use prevalence; and five land-use categories (foraging/hunting/gathering/fishing; pastoralism; extensive agriculture; intensive agriculture; urbanism).

We ended up receiving 711 regional assessments from 255 individual archaeologists – resulting in a globally complete, if uneven, map of archaeological knowledge. After synthesis and careful analysis, our results (along with 117 other co-authors) were published in 2019 in Science. We also made all our data and analysis available online, at every stage of the research process – even before we had finished collecting it – in an effort to stimulate the culture of open knowledge-sharing in archaeology as a discipline.

The resulting data-trove allows researchers to compare land-use systems over time and in different regions, as well as to aggregate their cumulative, global impacts at different points over the past 10,000 years. When we compared ArchaeoGLOBE results with HYDE, we found that archaeological assessments showed much earlier and more widespread agricultural land use than HYDE suggested – and, therefore, more intensive land use than had been factored into climate change assessments. Indeed, the beginnings of intensive agriculture in ArchaeoGLOBE were earlier than HYDE’s across more than half of Earth’s current agricultural regions, often by 1,000 years or more.

By 3,000 years ago, Earth’s terrestrial ecology was already largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, farmers and pastoralists – with more than half of regions assessed engaged in significant levels of agriculture or pastoralism. For example, the Kopaic Basin in the Greek region of Boeotia was drained and converted from wetland to agricultural land in the 13th century BCE. This plain – roughly 1,500 hectares (15 sq km) in size – surrounded by steep limestone hills, had been a large, shallow lake since the end of the last Ice Age. Late Bronze Age residents of the area, members of what we call the Mycenaean culture, constructed a hydraulic infrastructural system on a massive scale to drain the wetland and claim it for agriculture. They channelised rivers, dug drainage canals, built long dikes and expanded natural sinkholes to direct the water off what would have been nutrient-rich soil. Eventually, when the Mycenaean civilisation collapsed at the end of the Bronze Age, the basin flooded again and returned to its previous wetland state. Legend has it that Heracles filled in the sinkholes as revenge against a local king. The area was not successfully drained again until the 20th century.

These examples highlight a general trend we found that agriculture and pastoralism gradually replaced foraging-hunting-gathering around the world. But the data also show that there were reversals and different subsistence economies, from foraging to farming, operating in parallel in some places. Moreover, agriculture and pastoralism are not the only practices that transform environments. Hunter-gatherer land use was already widespread across the globe (82 per cent of regions) by 10,000 years ago. Through the selective harvest and translocation of favoured species, hunting (sometimes to extinction) and the use of fire to dramatically alter landscapes, most of the terrestrial biosphere was already significantly influenced by human activities, even before the domestication of plants and animals.

ArchaeoGLOBE is both a cause and a consequence of a dramatic change in perspective about how early land use produced long-term global environmental change. Archaeological knowledge is increasingly becoming a crucial instrument for understanding humanity’s cumulative effect on ecology and the Earth system, including global changes in climate and biodiversity. As a discipline, the mindset of archaeology stands in contrast to earlier perspectives grounded in the natural sciences, which have long emphasised a dichotomy between humans and nature.

In the ‘pristine myth’ paradigm from the natural sciences, as the geographer William Denevan called it, human societies are recent destroyers, or at the very least disturbers, of a mostly pristine natural world. Denevan was reacting against the portrayal of pre-1492 America as an untouched paradise, and he used the substantial evidence of indigenous landscape modification to argue that the human presence was perhaps more visible in 1492 than 1750. Recent popular conceptions of the Anthropocene risk making a similar mistake, drawing a thin bright line at 1950 and describing what comes after as a new, modern form of ecological disaster. Human changes to the environment are cumulative and were substantial at different scales throughout our history. The deep trajectory of land use revealed by ArchaeoGLOBE runs counter to the idea of pinpointing a single catalytic moment that fundamentally changed the relationship between humanity and the Earth system.

The pristine myth also accounts for why places without contemporary intensive land use are often dubbed ‘wilderness’ – such as areas of the Americas depopulated by the great post-Columbian die-off. Such interpretations, perpetuated by scientists, have long supported colonial narratives in which indigenous hunter-gatherer and even agricultural lands are portrayed as unused and ripe for productive use by colonial settlers.

The notion of a pristine Earth also pervaded the thinking of early conservationists in the United States such as John Muir. They were intent on preserving what they saw as the nobility of nature from a mob of lesser natural life, and also those eager to manage wilderness areas to maintain the trophy animals they enjoyed hunting. For example, the governor of California violently forced Indigenous peoples out of Yosemite Valley in the 19th century, making way for wilderness conservation. These ideas went hand-in-hand with a white supremacist view of humanity that cast immigrants and the poor as a type of invasive species. It was not a great leap of theorising to move from a notion of pristine nature to seeing much of humanity as the opposite – a contaminated, marring mass. In both realms, the human and the natural, the object was to exclude undesirable people to preserve bastions of the unspoilt world. These extreme expressions of a dichotomous view of nature and society are possible only by ignoring the growing evidence of long-term human changes to Earth’s ecology – humans were, and are still, essential components of most ‘natural’ ecosystems.

A clear-eyed appreciation for the deep entanglement of the human and natural worlds is vital

Humans have continually altered biodiversity on many scales. We have changed the local mix of species, their ranges, habitats and niches for thousands of years. Long before agriculture, selective human predation of many non-domesticated species shaped their evolutionary course. Even the relatively small hunter-gatherer populations of the late Pleistocene were capable of negatively affecting animal populations – driving many megafauna and island species extinct or to the point of extinction. But there have also been widespread social and ecological adaptations to these changes: human management can even increase biodiversity of landscapes and can sustain these increases for thousands of years. For example, pastoralism might have helped defer climate-driven aridification of the Sahara, maintaining mixed forests and grassland ecosystems in the region for centuries.

This recognition should cause us to rethink what ‘nature’ and ‘wilderness’ really are. If by ‘nature’ we mean something divorced from or untouched by humans, there’s almost nowhere on Earth where such conditions exist, or have existed for thousands of years. The same can be said of Earth’s climate. If early agricultural land use began warming our climate thousands of years ago, as the early anthropogenic hypothesis suggests, it implies that no ‘natural’ climate has existed for millennia.

A clear-eyed appreciation for the deep entanglement of the human and natural worlds is vital if we are to grapple with the unprecedented ecological challenges of our times. Naively romanticising a pristine Earth, on the other hand, will hold us back. Grasping that nature is inextricably linked with human societies is fundamental to the worldview of many Indigenous cultures – but it remains a novel and often controversial perspective within the natural sciences. Thankfully, it’s now gaining prominence within conservation circles, where it’s shifting attitudes about how to enable sustainable and resilient stewardship of land and ecosystems.

Viewing humans and nature as entwined doesn’t mean that we should shrug our shoulders at current climatic trends, unchecked deforestation, accelerating extinction rates or widespread industrial waste. Indeed, archaeology supplies numerous examples of societal and ecosystem collapse: a warning of what happens if we ignore the consequences of human-caused environmental change.

But ecological crises are not inevitable. Humans have long maintained sustainable environments by adapting and transforming their societies. As our work demonstrates, humans have shaped the ecology of this planet for thousands of years, and continue to shape it.

We live at a unique time in history, in which our awareness of our role in changing the planet is increasing at the precise moment when we’re causing it to change at an alarming rate. It’s ironic that technological advances are simultaneously accelerating both global environmental change and our ability to understand humans’ role in shaping life on Earth. Ultimately, though, a deeper appreciation of how the Earth’s environments are connected to human cultural values helps us make better decisions – and also places the responsibility for the planet’s future squarely on our shoulders.

2021 vai passar voando: movimento da Terra deixará ano mais curto (UOL)

uol.com.br

Marcella Duarte Colaboração para Tilt – 05/01/2021 17h02 4-5 minutos


Parecia que 2020 nunca ia acabar, mas, tecnicamente, ele passou mais depressa que o normal. E este ano será ainda mais ligeiro. O motivo? A Terra tem “girado” estranhamente depressa ultimamente. Por isso, pode ser que a gente precise adiantar nossos relógios, mas você nem vai perceber.

No ano passado, foi registrado o dia mais curto da história, desde que foram iniciadas as medições, há 50 anos. Em 19 de julho de 2020, o planeta completou sua rotação 1,4602 milésimo de segundo mais rápido que os costumeiros 86.400 segundos (24 horas).

O dia mais curto que até então se tinha registro aconteceu em 2005, e foi superado 28 vezes em 2020. E este ano deve ser o mais rápido da história, porque os dias de 2021 deverão ser, em média, 0,5 milissegundo mais curtos que o normal.

Essas pequenas mudanças na duração dos dias só foram descobertas após o desenvolvimento de relógios atômicos superprecisos, na década de 1960. Inicialmente, percebeu-se que a velocidade de rotação da Terra, quando gira em torno de seu próprio eixo resultando nos dias e noites, estava diminuindo ano após ano.

Desde a década de 1970, foi necessário “adicionar” 27 segundos no tempo atômico internacional, para manter nossa contagem de tempo sincronizada com o planeta mais lento. É o chamado “leap second” ou “inserção de segundo intercalado”.

Essas correções acontecem sempre ao final de um semestre, em 31 de dezembro ou 30 de junho. Assim, garante-se que o Sol sempre esteja exatamente no meio do céu ao meio-dia.

A última vez que ocorreu foi no Ano Novo de 2016, quando relógios no mundo todo pausaram por um segundo para “esperar” a Terra.

Mas recentemente, está acontecendo o oposto: a rotação está acelerando. E pode ser que a gente precise “saltar” o tempo para “alcançar” o movimento do planeta. Seria a primeira vez na história que um segundo seria deletado dos relógios internacionais.

Há um debate internacional sobre a necessidade deste ajuste e o futuro do cálculo do tempo. Cientistas acreditam que, ao longo de 2021, os relógios atômicos acumularão um atraso de 19 milésimos de segundos.

Se os ajustes não forem feitos, levaria centenas de anos para uma pessoa comum notar a diferença. Mas sistemas de navegação e de comunicação por satélite —que usam a posição da Terra, do Sol e das estrelas para funcionar— podem ser impactados mais brevemente.

Nossos “guardiões do tempo” são os oficiais do Serviço Internacional de Sistemas de Referência e Rotação da Terra (Iers), em Paris, França. São eles que monitoram a rotação da Terra e os 260 relógios atômicos espalhados pelo mundo e avisam quando é necessário adicionar —ou eventualmente deletar— algum segundo.

Manipular o tempo pode ter consequências. Quando foi adicionado um “leap second” em 2012, gigantes tecnológicos da época, como Linux, Mozilla, Java, Reddit, Foursquare, Yelp e LinkedIn reportaram falhas.

A velocidade de rotação da Terra varia constantemente, dependendo de diversos fatores, como o complexo movimento de seu núcleo derretido, dos oceanos e da atmosfera, além das interações gravitacionais com outros corpos celestes, como a Lua. O aquecimento global, e consequente derretimento das calotas polares e gelo das montanhas também tem acelerado a movimentação.

Por isso, os dias nunca têm duração exatamente igual. O último domingo (3) teve “apenas” 23 horas, 59 minutos e 59,9998927 segundos. Já a segunda-feira (4) foi mais preguiçosa, com pouco mais de 24 horas.

Cavani, jogador de futebol, acusado de racismo na Inglaterra por uso de expressão coloquial uruguaia, em espanhol, nas redes sociais: o racismo sistêmico nos usos da língua no Uruguai

Academia Uruguaia de Letras defende Cavani em caso de suposto racismo e lamenta ‘falta de conhecimento’ de federação inglesa (O Globo)

O Globo, com Reuters – 02 de janeiro de 2021


Jogador foi punido por ter usado termo ‘negrito’ em sua rede social, ao agradecer a um amigo que lhe deu os parabéns depois da vitória contra Southampton

02/01/2021 – 10:33 / Atualizado em 02/01/2021 – 11:12

Cavani, do Manchester United, foi punido com multa e suspensão de três jogos Foto: MARTIN RICKETT / Pool via REUTERS
Cavani, do Manchester United, foi punido com multa e suspensão de três jogos Foto: MARTIN RICKETT / Pool via REUTERS

A Academia de Letras do Uruguai classificou nesta sexta-feira como “ignorante” e uma “grave injustiça”a punição de três jogos recebida pelo atacante Edinson Cavani, do Manchester United, aplicada pela  Football Association (FA), entidade máxima do futebol inglês, por uso do termo “negrito” para se referir a um seguidor em uma postagem numa rede social.

O uruguaio de 33 anos usou a palavra “negrito” em um post no Instagram após a vitória do clube sobre o Southampton em 29 de novembro, antes de retirá-lo do ar e se desculpar. Ele disse que era uma expressão de afeto a um amigo.

Postagem de Cavani que gerou polêmica Foto: Reproduçao
Postagem de Cavani que gerou polêmica Foto: Reproduçao

Na quinta-feira, a FA disse que o comentário era “impróprio e trouxe descrédito ao jogo” e multou Cavani em 100 mil.

A academia, uma associação dedicada a proteger e promover o espanhol usado no Uruguai, disse que “rejeitou energicamente a sanção”.

“A Federação Inglesa de Futebol cometeu uma grave injustiça com o desportista uruguaio … e mostrou a sua ignorância e erro ao regulamentar o uso da língua, em particular o espanhol, sem dar atenção a todas as suas complexidades e contextos”, afirmou a academia, por meio de seu presidente, Wilfredo Penco. “No contexto em que foi escrito, o único valor que se pode dar ao negrito (e principalmente pelo uso diminutivo) é afetuoso”.

Segundo a Academia, palavras que se referem à cor da pele, peso e outras características físicas são freqüentemente usadas entre amigos e parentes na América Latina, especialmente no diminutivo. A entidade acrescenta que até pessoas alvo destas expressões muitas vezes nem tem as características citadas.

“O uso que Cavani fez para se dirigir ao amigo ‘pablofer2222’ (nome da conta) tem este tipo de teor carinhoso — dado o contexto em que foi escrito, a pessoa a quem foi dirigido e a variedade do espanhol usado, o único valor que “negrito” pode ter é o carinhoso. Para insultar em espanhol, inglês ou outra língua, é preciso ter a capacidade para ofender o outro e aí o próprio ‘pablofer2222’ teria expressado o seu incómodo”, encerra a Academia.

Cavani: “Meu coração está em paz”

Cavani usou a rede social para comentar o episódio e assumiu “desconforto” com a situação. Garantiu que nunca foi sua intenção ofender o amigo e que a expressão usada foi de afeto.

“Não quero me alongar muito neste momento desconfortável. Quero dizer que aceito a sanção disciplinar, sabendo que sou estrangeiro para os costumes da língua inglesa, mas que não partilho do mesmo ponto de vista. Peço desculpa se ofendi alguém com uma expressão de afeto para com um amigo, não era essa a minha intenção. Aqueles que me conhecem sabem que os meus esforços são sempre procurar a simples alegria e amizade”, escreveu o jogador.

“Agradeço as inúmeras mensagens de apoio e afeto. O meu coração está em paz porque sei que sempre me expressei com afeto de acordo com a minha cultura e estilo de vida. Um sincero abraço”.


oglobo.globo.com

Cavani: Federação uruguaia e jogadores da seleção defendem atacante e pedem revisão de pena por racismo (O Globo)

Jogador foi suspenso por três partidas e multado pela Football Association por escrever ‘Negrito’ em suas redes sociais

04/01/2021 – 12:46 / Atualizado em 04/01/2021 – 13:45

Cavani foi suspenso por três jogos pela Federação Inglesa acusado de racismo Foto: MARTIN RICKETT/ Pool via REUTERS
Cavani foi suspenso por três jogos pela Federação Inglesa acusado de racismo Foto: MARTIN RICKETT/ Pool via REUTERS

A punição imposta a Edinson Cavani pela Football Association (FA, entidade que gere o futebol na Inglaterra) pela reprodução do termo “Negrito” (diminutivo de negro, em espanhol) em suas redes sociais segue no centro de uma intensa discussão no Uruguai. Depois da Academia Uruguaia de Letras prestar solidariedade e chamar a pena de desconhecimento cultural, os jogadores da seleção e a própria Associação Uruguaia de Futebol (AUF) se manifestaram em favor do atacante.

Nesta segunda, a Associação de Futebolistas do Uruguai publicou uma carta na qual manifestou seu repúdio à decisão da FA. O documento classifica a punição como uma arbitrariedade e diz que a entidade teve uma visão distorcida, dogmática e etnocentrista do tema.

“Longe de realizar uma defesa contra o racismo, o que a FA cometeu foi um ato discriminatório contra a cultura e a forma de vida dos uruguaios”, acusa o órgão que representa a classe de jogadores do país sul-americano.

O documento foi compartilhado nas redes sociais por jogadores da seleção. Entre eles, o atacante Luis Suárez, do Atlético de Madri; e o capitão Diego Godín, zagueiro do Cagliari-ITA.

Logo em seguida, a própria federação uruguaia se juntou à rede de apoio ao atacante e ídolo da Celeste. Em comunicado divulgado em suas redes sociais, a entidade pede que a FA retire a pena imposta a Cavani e reitera a argumentação utilizada pela Academia Uruguaia de Letras ao tentar desassociar o termo “negrito” de qualquer conotação racista.

“No nosso espanhol, que difere muito do castelhano falado em outras regiões do mundo, os apelidos negro/a e negrito/a são utilizados assiduamente como expressão de amizade, afeto, proximidade e confiança e de forma alguma se referem de forma depreciativa ou discriminatória à raça ou cor da pele de quem se faz alusão”, defende o órgão.

Cavani já cumpriu o primeiro dos três jogos que recebeu de suspensão. Ele não foi relacionado para a partida do Manchester United contra o Aston Villa, no último sábado, pelo Campeonato Inglês. Além deste gancho, o jogador foi condenado a pagar uma multa de 100 mil libras (cerca de R$ 700 mil). A punição foi dada após ele escrever “Obrigado, negrito” a um elogio feito por um seguidor do Instagram.

“Um comentário postado na página Instagram do jogador do Manchester United foi insultuoso e/ou abusivo e/ou impróprio e/ou trouxe descrédito ao jogo”, posicionou-se a FA ao aplicar a pena.

Embora o episódio tenha gerado muita indignação no Uruguai, país de maioria branca, o próprio Cavani não levou o caso adiante. Ao se manifestar, o atacante se disse incomodado com a situação, não concordou com a punição, mas enfatizou que a aceitava.

A necessária indomesticabilidade de termos como “Antropoceno”: desafios epistemológicos e ontologia relacional (Opinião Filosófica)

Opinião Filosófica Special Issuehttps://doi.org/10.36592/opiniaofilosofica.v11.1009


A necessária indomesticabilidade de termos como “Antropoceno”: desafios epistemológicos e ontologia relacional

The necessary untameability of terms as “the Anthropocene”: epistemological challenges and relational ontology


Renzo Taddei[1]
Davide Scarso[2]
Nuno Pereira Castanheira[3]

Resumo
Nesta entrevista, realizada por Davide Scarso e Nuno Pereira Castanheira entre os meses de novembro e dezembro de 2020 via e-mail, o Professor Renzo Taddei (Unifesp) discute o significado do termo Antropoceno e as suas implicações, com base nas contribuições teóricas de Deborah Danowski, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Donna Haraway, Isabelle Stengers e Bruno Latour, entre outros. O entrevistado enfatiza a necessidade de evitarmos a redução do Antropoceno ou termos similares a conceitos científicos, assim preservando a sua capacidade indutora de novas perspectivas e transformações existenciais e resistindo à tentação de objetivação dominadora de um mundo mais complexo e bagunçado do que a epistemologia clássica gostaria de admitir.

Palavras-chave: Ecologia. Sustentabilidade. Ontologia. Epistemologia. Política

Abstract
In this interview, conducted via e-mail by Davide Scarso and Nuno Pereira Castanheira between the months of November and December 2020, Professor Renzo Taddei (Unifesp) discusses the meaning of the term Anthropocene and its implications, based on the theoretical contributions of Deborah Danowski, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Donna Haraway, Isabelle Stengers and Bruno Latour, among others. The interviewee emphasizes the need of avoiding the reduction of the Anthropocene and similar terms to scientific concepts, thus preserving their ability to induce new perspectives and existential transformation, and resisting the temptation of objectifying domination of a world that is more complex and messier than classical epistemology would like to acknowledge.

Keywords: Ecology. Sustainability. Ontology. Epistemology. Politics


1)  O que exatamente é o Antropoceno: um conceito científico, uma proposição política, um alarme soando?

Esta questão é tema de amplos e acalorados debates. Uma coisa que parece estar clara, no entanto, é que não há lugar para o advérbio “exatamente” nas muitas formas como o Antropoceno é conceitualizado. De certa maneira, o contexto em que a questão é colocada define suas respostas potenciais. Sugerir um nome que aponte para os sintomas do problema é distinto de tentar circunscrever as suas causas, e ambas as coisas não são equivalentes ao intento de atribuir responsabilidades. O problema é que o Antropoceno pode ser lido como qualquer uma destas coisas, e isso causa desentendimentos. É neste contexto que surgem argumentos em defesa do uso dos termos Capitaloceno ou Plantationceno[4], dentre outros, como alternativas mais apropriadas. O anthropos do Antropoceno sugere uma humanidade tomada de forma geral, sem atentar para a quantidade de injustiça e racismo ambientais na conformação do contexto presente.

Todos estes nomes têm sua utilidade, mas devem ser usados com cuidado. Como mostraram, cada qual à sua maneira, Timothy Morton[5] e Deborah Danowski e Eduardo Viveiros de Castro[6] em colaboração, não somos capazes de abarcar o problema em sua totalidade. É um marco importante na história do pensamento social e filosófico que efetivamente exista certo consenso de que o problema é maior e mais complexo que nossos sistemas conceituais e nossas categorias de pensamento. O que nos resta é fazer uso produtivo, na forma de bricolagem, das ferramentas conceituais imperfeitas que possuímos. Como Donna Haraway afirmou repetidamente por toda a sua carreira, o mundo real é mais complexo e bagunçado (“messy”) do que tendemos a reconhecer. Todas as teorias científicas são modelos de arame, e isto inclui, obviamente, as das ciências sociais. Não seria diferente no que diz respeito ao Antropoceno.

No fundo, a busca sôfrega pelo termo “correto” é um sintoma do problema de como nossas mentes estão colonizadas por ideias positivistas sobre a realidade. Em geral, tendemos a cair muito rápido na armadilha de sentir que, quando temos um nome para algo, entendemos do que se trata. Via de regra, trata-se do oposto: nomes estão associados a formas de regimentação semiótica do mundo; são parte de nossos esforços em domesticação da realidade, em tentativa de reduzi-la a nossas expectativas sobre ela. Este é especialmente o caso de nomes “taxonômicos”, como o Antropoceno: são molduras totalizantes que direcionam nossa atenção a certas dimensões do mundo, produzidas pelas ideias hegemônicas do lugar e do tempo em que estão em voga. Há muitas maneiras de desarmar esse esquema; uma é apontando para o fato de que pensar um mundo feito de “objetos” ou mesmo “fenômenos” é causa e efeito, ao mesmo tempo, do fato de que as ciências buscam, em geral, causas unitárias para efeitos específicos no mundo. Isso funciona para a física newtoniana mas não funciona para o que chamamos de ecossistemas, por exemplo. A existência mesma do hábito de criar coisas como o termo Antropoceno nos impede de abordar de forma produtiva o problema que o termo tenta descrever.

O termo é, desta forma, uma tentativa de objetificação; o que ele acaba objetificando são alguns de nossos medos e ansiedades. Dado que temos muito a temer, e tememos de formas muito diversas, não é surpresa que inexista consenso a respeito do que é o Antropoceno.   

Se um nome se faz necessário, precisamos de um que faça coisas outras que reduzir nossa ansiedade cognitiva a níveis administráveis. Esta é a forma, lembremos, como Latour definiu a produção da “verdade” no âmbito das ciências[7]. Ou seja, o que estou dizendo é que o Antropoceno, ou qualquer outro termo que usemos em seu lugar, para ser útil de alguma forma, não deve ser um conceito científico. Necessitamos de um termo que desestabilize nossos esquemas conceituais e nos induza a novas perspectivas e à transformação de nossos modos de existência. Um conceito desta natureza deve ser, necessariamente, indomesticável. Deve, portanto, resistir ao próprio ímpeto definidor da cognição. Etimologicamente, definir é delimitar, colocar limites; trata-se, portanto, de uma forma de domesticação. Um conceito indomesticável será, necessariamente, desconfortável; será percebido como “confusão”.

Na minha percepção, essa é uma das dimensões do conceito de Chthuluceno, proposto por Donna Haraway[8]. Ele não nos fala sobre o que supostamente está acontecendo com o mundo, mas propõe, ao mesmo tempo e de forma sobreposta, novas maneiras de entender as relações entre os seres e o poder de constituição de mundos de tais relações, onde o humano e o próprio pensamento são frutos de processos simpoiéticos. Esta perspectiva impossibilita a adoção, mesmo que tácita e por hábito, da ideia de humano herdada do iluminismo e do liberalismo europeus como elemento definidor da condição que vivemos no Antropoceno, e desarticula o especismo embutido em tais perspectivas.

Outra dimensão fundamental associada ao conceito de Chthuluceno é sua rejeição das metafísicas totalizantes, onde ideias abstratas tem a pretensão de ser universais e, portanto, de não ter ancoragem contextual. Haraway sugere que precisamos alterar nossa perspectiva a respeito do que é importante, em direção ao que ela chama de materialismo sensível em contextos simpoiéticos: a capacidade de perceber as relações que constituem a vida, nos contextos locais, e de agir de forma responsável sobre tais relações. Toda forma de conhecimento é parcial, fragmentada, e tem marcas de nascimento. Quando o conhecimento se apresenta sem o reconhecimento explícito dessas coisas, uma de duas alternativas está em curso: os envolvidos reconhecem e aceitam essa incontornável contextualidade do saber e isso não é mais uma questão; ou o conhecimento segue parte das engrenagens do colonialismo.

A ideia de aterramento, apresentada no último livro de Latour[9], converge em grande medida com as posições de Haraway. Em termos de tradições filosóficas, na minha percepção de não-especialista parece-me que ambos se alinham com o pragmatismo norte-americano, ainda que raramente façam referência a isso.

2)  Frequentemente, quando se discutem os problemas ambientais mais críticos do presente, mas também outros temas urgentes da contemporaneidade, a falta de unanimidade e consenso é lamentada. O que seria, à luz de sua pesquisa e reflexão, uma resposta “adequada” às muitas questões difíceis colocadas pelo Antropoceno?

Vivemos em tempos complexos, e o desenvolvimento das ferramentas conceituais disponíveis para dar conta do que temos adiante de nós segue em ritmo acelerado, mas não exatamente na direção do que as ideologias de progresso científico do século 20 supunham natural. Não me parece que estamos chegando “mais perto” de algo que sejamos capazes de chamar de “solução”, ainda que filosófica. Não se trata mais disso. O que os autores inseridos nos debates sobre o Antropoceno estão sugerindo é que este ideário de progresso colapsou filosoficamente, ainda que siga sendo conveniente ao capitalismo. A maior parte da academia segue trabalhando dentro deste paradigma falido, de forma inercial ou porque efetivamente atua para fornecer recursos ao capitalismo.

O que ocorre é que as noções de que a mente tem acesso imediato à realidade e de que as ideias explicativas sobre o mundo buscam uma ordem subjacente universal, da qual as coisas e contextos são apenas reflexos imperfeitos – uma ordem platônica, portanto – vêm sendo atacadas desde pelo menos Nietzsche. Os autores mais importantes do debate do Antropoceno são herdeiros de uma corrente perspectivista do século 20 que tinha Nietzsche em posição central, mas que incluía também Whitehead e James, e que posteriormente esteve ligada principalmente a Deleuze e Foucault. Isso explica o fato de que é parte fundamental do debate sobre o Antropoceno a crítica às filosofias de transcendência e a atenção dada à questão das relações de imanência. É contribuição fundamental de Eduardo Viveiros de Castro mostrar ao mundo que o que Deleuze entendia como imanência tinha relações profundas com o pensamento indígena amazônico[10], e ele estava trabalhando nisso muito antes da questão do Antropoceno se impor na filosofia e nas ciências sociais. Quando o Antropoceno se tornou tema incontornável, a questão dos modos de vida indígenas ganhou saliência não apenas por se apresentar como forma real, empírica de se viver de modos relacionais, mas também pelo fato de que os povos indígenas têm pegada de carbono zero e promovem a biodiversidade. Este último item funciona como ponte entre os debates mais propriamente filosóficos e os ecológicos.

Isso tudo me parece importante para falarmos sobre o que são, e que expectativas existem em torno dos temas de unanimidade e consenso. O desejo da comunicação perfeita é irmão gêmeo do desejo da nomeação perfeita, citado na resposta anterior. Em ambos os casos, trata-se da manifestação de uma concepção de mente que flutua no vácuo, desconectada das bases materiais e processuais que a fazem existir. De certa forma, esta concepção subjaz aos debates sobre o dissenso sempre que este é entendido como problema epistemológico. Quando isso ocorre, a intersubjetividade entendida como necessária ao processo de construção de consenso é vista como ligada a conceitos e ideias, e os diagnósticos sobre a razão do dissenso rapidamente caem nas valas comuns da “falta de educação” ou de “formas míticas de pensamento”.

A despeito das diferenças entre os autores associados ao debate sobre o Antropoceno – Haraway, Latour, Viveiros de Castro, Stengers, dentre muitos outros -, uma das coisas que todos têm em comum é a rejeição de uma abordagem que reduz o problema a uma questão epistemológica, em favor de uma perspectiva que dá centralidade à dimensão mais propriamente ontológica. Em razão disso, intercâmbios muito frutíferos passaram a ocorrer entre a filosofia e a antropologia, como se pode ver na obra não apenas do Viveiros de Castro, mas também de Tim Ingold, Elizabeth Povinelli, Anna Tsing, e muitos outros.

A questão aqui é que, quando as questões ontológicas, dentro de filosofias relacionais e perspectivísticas, passam a ser tomadas em conta, a comunicação passa a ser outra coisa. O exemplo mais bem acabado de teorização sobre isso é a teoria do perspectivismo ameríndio[11], desenvolvida por Viveiros de Castro e por Tania Stolze Lima. Esta teoria postula que o que os seres percebem no mundo é definido pelo tipo de corpos que têm, dentro de relações interespecíficas perigosas (de predação, por exemplo), e frente a um pano de fundo cosmológico em que grande parte dos seres têm consciência e intencionalidade equivalentes às humanas. Para alguns povos, por exemplo, a onça vê o humano como porco do mato e sangue como cerveja de caium, enquanto o porco do mato vê o humano como onça. A questão crucial, aqui, é que nenhuma das visões é ontologicamente superior à outra. Isso quer dizer que percepção humana não é mais “correta” que a da onça; é simplesmente produzida por um corpo humano, enquanto a da onça é produzida por um corpo de onça. Não há perspectiva absoluta, porque não corpo absoluto.    

Como é que onça e humano se comunicam, então? A pergunta é interessante logo de saída, porque entre os ocidentais a onça é tida como irracional e destituída de linguagem, e a comunicação é entendida como impossível. Nos mundos indígenas, geralmente cabe ao xamã, através de tecnologias xamânicas – que na Amazônia costuma implicar o uso de substâncias das plantas da floresta -, sair de seu corpo de humano e entrar em contato com o espírito da onça, ou dos seres de alguma forma associados às onças. Mas essa é apenas parte da questão; a relação entre caçador e presa, mais ordinária do que o contexto xamânico, é frequentemente descrita como relação de sedução, como uma forma de coreografia entre os corpos.

Alguns autores do debate sobre o Antropoceno têm explorado as implicações filosóficas de uma nova fronteira da microbiologia que apresenta os seres e seus corpos através de outras lentes. Em seu último livro, Haraway discute o conceito de holobionte, um emaranhado de seres em relações simbióticas que permitem a ocorrência da vida dos envolvidos. A questão filosófica importante que advém dos holobiontes é que, ao invés de falarmos de seres que estão em simbiose, parece mais apropriado dizer que é a partir das relações que emergem os seres. A simbiose é anterior aos seres, por assim dizer. Isso pode parecer muito técnico, e fica mais claro se mencionarmos que o corpo humano é entendido como um holobionte. O corpo existe em relação de simbiose com um número imenso de bactérias e outros seres, como fungos e vírus, e está bem documentado que as bactérias que habitam o trato intestinal humano têm efeito sobre o funcionamento do sistema nervoso, induzindo a pessoa a certos estados de ânimo e vontades. Esticando o argumento no limite da provocação, seria possível dizer que o que chamamos de consciência não é produzido nas células que têm o “nosso” DNA, mas é um fenômeno emergente da associação simbiótica entre os sistemas do corpo humano e os demais seres que compõe o holobionte.

Se for este o caso, a comunicação não se dá entre mentes e sistemas semióticos imateriais, mas entre seres imbuídos de sua materialidade e da materialidade dos contextos em que vivem. Mais do que pensar de forma alinhada, a questão passa a ser encontrar formas de relação que, como diz Haraway, nos permita viver e morrer bem em simpoiese com os demais seres. Como coloquei em outro lugar[12], precisamos ser capazes de fazer alianças com quem não pensa como pensamos, com quem não pensa como humanos, e com que não pensa.

O problema é imensamente maior que o do consenso, e ao mesmo tempo mais realista, em termos das possibilidades de materialização de soluções. Duas formas de abordagem da questão foram desenvolvidas entre antropólogos que trabalham na Amazônia: Viveiros de Castro propôs a teoria do equívoco controlado[13], e Mauro Almeida a dos encontros pragmáticos[14]. Ambos os casos se referem à comunicação de seres que existem em mundos distintos, ou seja, suas existências são compostas de acordo com pressupostos distintos sobre o que existe e o que significa existir. É imediato pensar no contexto do contato entre povos indígenas e não indígenas, mas o esquema pode ser usado para pensar qualquer relação de diferença. A ideia de que a comunicação pressupõe necessariamente o alinhamento epistemológico, nesta perspectiva, implica processos de violência contra corpos, culturas e mundos.

Basta olharmos a nosso redor para perceber que a vida comum não pressupõe alinhamento epistemológico. Há alguns dias vi um grupo de formigas cooperando para carregar uma migalha de pão muito maior do que o corpo de cada uma delas, e estavam subindo uma parede vertical. Fiquei espantado com a capacidade de cooperação entre seres entre os quais não existe atividade epistemológica. Entre os seres que pensam, boa parte do que existe no mundo é fruto de desentendimentos produtivos – uma pessoa diz uma coisa, a outra entende algo diferente, e juntas transformam a sua realidade, sem serem capazes sequer de avaliar de forma idêntica o resultado de suas ações, mas ainda assim podendo ambas sentirem-se satisfeitas com o processo. É como se estivessem dançando: nunca se dança da mesma forma, ainda que os corpos estejam conectados, e tampouco se entende o que se está fazendo da mesma forma durante a performance da dança, e com tudo isso é perfeitamente possível que o efeito seja o sentimento de satisfação e a fruição estético-afetiva da situação.

Haraway tem uma forma ainda mais provocadora de colocar a questão: devemos construir relações de parentesco com outros seres, animados e inanimados, se quisermos efetivamente caminhar no tratamento dos problemas ambientais.

No contexto dos conflitos associados ao Antropoceno, dois exemplos equivalentes de acordos pragmáticos são as manifestações conta a exploração de xisto betuminoso no Canadá, em 2013, e os protestos contra o oleoduto que cruzaria o território Sioux nos estados de Dakota do Sul e Dakota do Norte, nos Estados Unidos, em 2016. Em ambos os casos, viam-se pessoas indígenas marchando ao lado de estudantes universitários não-indígenas, ativistas e celebridades televisivas. Enquanto os manifestantes indígenas referiam-se à poluição do seu solo sagrado como motivação para o protesto, ativistas e celebridades gritavam o slogan de que não devemos continuar emitindo carbono. O fato de que um astro de Hollywood seja incapaz de entender o que é o solo sagrado Sioux não o impediu de marchar ao lado de anciãos Sioux que não têm nada parecido com a “molécula do carbono” em suas ontologias. Este é um exemplo pedagógico do tipo de acordo pragmático que precisamos no futuro.

Precisamos encontrar formas de “marchar” ao lado de processos do sistema terrestre que não entendemos, bem como de rochas, rios, plantas, animais, e outros seres humanos. É claro que isso não significa abdicar do uso da capacidade do uso da linguagem, mas apenas que devemos parar de atribuir poderes metafísicos transcendentes a ela – inclusive o de resolver todos os conflitos humanos -, e entender que a linguagem é tão material e relacional quantos as demais dimensões da existência.

3) Nas conversas sobre o Antropoceno e a crise ambiental planetária, as palavras e ações de resistência de comunidades indígenas de distintos lugares é frequentemente evocada. Qual é, na sua visão, a contribuição que estas experiências e intervenções, aparentemente tão distanciadas da face mais tecnológica, para não dizer tecnocrática, dos discursos oficiais sobre o Antropoceno, oferecem ao debate?

São inúmeras, e possivelmente as transformações em curso relacionadas ao papel e lugar dos intelectuais e líderes indígenas nas sociedades ocidentais ou ocidentalizadas fará com que sejamos capazes de perceber nuances dos modos de existência indígenas que hoje não são valorizadas. Refiro-me, no caso do Brasil, ao fato de que, no período de dois anos, Sonia Guajajara foi candidata à vice-presidência da república, Raoni foi indicado ao prêmio Nobel da Paz, Ailton Krenak foi agraciado com o prêmio Juca Pato de intelectual do ano e Davi Kopenawa ganhou o Right Livelihood Award e foi eleito para a Academia Brasileira de Ciência. E isso tudo nos dois anos mais obscuros e retrógrados da história política recente do país.

Uma parte da resposta já foi elaborada nas questões anteriores. O que se poderia agregar é o fato de que, como Latour desenvolve em seu último livro, não se pode ficar assistindo o desenrolar dos fatos na esperança de que, no fim, tudo dê certo em razão de alguma ordem transcendente misteriosa. O momento atual é de embate entre quem se alinha e vive de acordo com as agendas de exploração colonial do planeta, mesmo que não se perceba desta forma, e quem luta pela recomposição dos modos de existência em aliança com os ecossistemas e demais seres. O discurso oficial sobre o Antropoceno está em transformação, justamente em razão do ativismo das lideranças indígenas, como Davi Kopenawa[15] e Ailton Krenak[16], e dos pensadores que venho mencionando em minhas respostas, junto aos meios mais conservadores da ciência e da sociedade. E uso o termo ativismo de forma consciente aqui: não se trata de escrever livros e esperar que o mundo se transforme (ou não) como resultado. A disputa se dá palmo a palmo, reunião a reunião, e o final da história não está definido. Esta atitude se alinha mais com o modo como os indígenas entendem a realidade do que com o pensamento ocidental moderno.

Uma última coisa que vale a pena adicionar, aqui, diz respeito à questão da relação entre os modos de vida indígena e a sustentabilidade. É possível que toda a argumentação que eu apresentei aqui até agora tenha pouca aceitação e repercussão entre os cientistas que definem isso que a pergunta chama de “discursos oficiais”. Ocorre, no entanto, que pesquisas nas áreas de biodiversidade e ecologia têm mostrado que nos territórios indígenas em que as populações vivem de modos tradicionais, a eficácia na conservação da biodiversidade é igual, e algumas vezes maior, do que as medidas preservacionistas mais misantrópicas, como as chamadas áreas de proteção integral. Isto tem chamado a atenção dos biólogos e ecologistas, graças ao trabalho de antropólogos como a Manuela Carneiro da Cunha, o Mauro Almeida, o Eduardo Brondízio e outros[17]. Os povos indígenas, deste modo, são bons em conservação da natureza, mesmo que não tenham, em seus vocabulários, uma palavra para natureza. É de importância central, para os esforços ocidentais em conservação da biodiversidade, entender como isso se passa entre os povos indígenas e demais populações tradicionais. Escrevi sobre isso recentemente[18]: a chave para a compreensão deste fenômeno reside na relação entre o conceito de cuidado e a ontologia relacional habitadas pelos povos indígenas. Colocando isso de forma direta, em um contexto em que as coisas importantes do mundo são pessoas, isto é, possuem intenção e agência, independente do formato e da natureza dos seus corpos, as relações entre os seres passam a ser sociais e políticas e, portanto, perigosas e complicadas. A liberdade de ação é bem menor em um mundo em que árvores, rios e animais são gente com força de ação política. O resultado líquido disso é o que chamamos de proteção da biodiversidade.

Ou seja, índio não protege a natureza porque gosta ou vive dentro dela; índio protege a floresta justamente porque a natureza, da forma como o Iluminismo europeu plasmou o conceito, simplesmente não existe[19]. Disso tudo decorre que o cuidado para com a vida é um precipitado da arquitetura ontológica dos mundos indígenas, sem demandar voluntarismo nem culpa. Nos modos de vida ocidentais, cuidado é entendido como vontade, como obrigação moral[20], em um contexto em que as infraestruturas e o jogo político são capazes muito facilmente de desarticularem tal voluntarismo. Isso explica a desconexão entre o conhecimento e o cuidado nos modos de vida ocidentais modernos. Se tomarmos a Amazônia como exemplo, é muito fácil perceber que nunca se estudou tanto o bioma amazônico como nos últimos 20 anos; ao mesmo tempo, isso não deteve em nada a devastação da floresta. A mensagem relevante, aqui, e que é bastante contundente, é que ao invés de ficarmos culpando o mundo da política por impedir que o conhecimento científico se transforme em cuidado efetivo para com o meio ambiente, precisamos transformar as bases ontológicas sobre as quais conhecimento sobre o mundo e ação no mundo ocorrem, de modo que, à maneira dos mundos indígenas, conhecer seja, ao mesmo tempo e de forma imediata, cuidar.

4)  O seu trabalho toca frequentemente em questões associadas à interdisciplinaridade, um tema recorrente em muitas das iniciativas relacionadas ao Antropoceno e às mudanças climáticas. Como você resumiria sua experiência e posição a respeito disso?

Com minha colega Sophie Haines[21] desenvolvi uma análise das relações interdisciplinares na academia, com base nas coisas que mencionei em meu comentário acima sobre o consenso, a linguagem e a comunicação. O universo da cooperação interdisciplinar é permeado por conflitos de todas as naturezas, mas o mais proeminente é o resultado da ideia de que a colaboração só é possível com o alinhamento dos conceitos. A quantidade de tempo, fundos e amizades que se desperdiçam na tentativa vã de colonizar as mentes uns dos outros é imensa. Por essa razão as paredes simbólicas dos departamentos universitários são tão grossas.

Uma forma de pensar o problema, usando ainda o arcabouço conceitual da filosofia da ciência, é considerar que em termos epistemológicos, o mundo ao qual a atividade intelectual se refere pode ser dividido em três campos: o das variáveis, foco da atenção e do investimento da atividade científica, e que define os próprios contornos disciplinares; o dos axiomas, que são suposições a respeito da realidade que não estão ali para serem testadas, mas para instrumentalizar o trabalho com as variáveis; e o que Pierre Bourdieu[22] chamou de doxa, o fundo fenomênico da realidade que é tomado como não problemático (e portanto não tem o privilégio de se transformar em variável de pesquisa), e que algumas vezes sequer é reconhecido como existente. O problema nas relações interdisciplinares é que o que é variável para uma disciplina é parte da doxa para a outra, o que induz os acadêmicos a pensar que o que os colegas de disciplinas muito distintas fazem é inútil e perda de tempo. Vivi isso na pele, no início de minha pesquisa de campo de doutorado, quando disse a colegas meteorologistas que iria pesquisar a dimensão cultural do clima. Um deles me falou que parecia óbvio que as culturas reagissem aos climas, e isso portanto não justificaria uma pesquisa que pudesse ser chamada de científica.

Hoje, mais de duas décadas depois, as grandes agências financiadoras internacionais, como a National Science Foundation e o Belmont Forum, exigem a participação de cientistas sociais em pesquisas sobre questões ambientais. As coisas caminharam. Mas falta muito a ser feito ainda.

5)  Em algo que pode ser visto como um gesto “revisionista”, Bruno Latour recentemente afirmou que o declínio acentuado na confiança pública das ciências “duras” e nos cientistas pode estar de alguma forma relacionado com décadas de trabalhos críticos produzidos pelas ciências sociais. Devemos nós, pesquisadores das ciências sociais (e, de forma mais geral, intelectuais) recuarmos para uma forma de “essencialismo estratégico”? Ou, colocando de outra maneira, o que significa hoje um posicionamento crítico no debate sobre o Antropoceno?

Na minha percepção, a ideia de essencialismo estratégico é produto de formas essencialistas de pensar. Como se tivéssemos uma resposta rígida e correta que precisasse ser escondida. Em termos pragmáticos as coisas podem parecer assim, mas conceitualmente a questão é outra. A ideia de que estamos escondendo a resposta “correta” vai contra a compreensão da realidade como constituída de forma relacional. É como se na arena de embates a realidade não estivesse sendo plasmada ali mesmo, mas o conhecimento sobre a realidade fosse algo rígido que é apresentado na arena como arma para acabar com a conversa. Este é um argumento antigo de Latour; já estava em Jamais Fomos Modernos[23].

Há uma outra questão importante a ser mencionada: Latour é nada mais do que vítima do seu próprio sucesso em ganhar um grau de atenção que se estende de forma inédita para fora da academia. Ele não foi o primeiro a revelar que os mecanismos de produção da ciência ocidental não condizem com a imagem que os discursos hegemônicos da ciência apresentam de si. Isso já estava em Wittgenstein. Paul Feyerabend desenvolveu toda a sua carreira sobre essa questão. O trabalho sobre os paradigmas e revoluções científicas de Thomas Kuhn[24] teve grande repercussão no mundo acadêmico, e é um dos golpes mais devastadores no positivismo. Lyotard[25] inaugura o que ficou conhecido como momento pós-moderno com um livro que ataca os ideais positivos da modernidade. Mais recentemente, a ideia de que se pode associar os problemas políticos com os científicos, de modo que ao resolver os últimos se resolvem os primeiros, foi novamente atacada pela teoria da sociedade do risco de Beck[26] e da ciência pós-normal de Funtowicz e Ravetz[27].

A diferença da atuação de Latour é que ele efetivamente buscou interlocução fora da academia. Ele escreveu obras teatrais, organizou diversas exposições, interagiu de forma criativa com artistas, fez experimentos sobre sua ideia de parlamento das coisas misturando intelectuais, ativistas e artistas, e recorrentemente faz uso de um estilo de escrita que busca ser inteligível entre audiências não acadêmicas. Ele começou sua carreira docente na França em uma escola de engenharia, e tem interagido de forma intensa com o meio da arquitetura e do design, especialmente no campo da computação. Ainda que para muita gente as ideias dele não são exatamente fáceis, não há dúvida de que todo o seu esforço deu frutos. E colocou ele na mira dos conservadores, naturalmente.

Ocorre que, ao se adotar uma abordagem ontológica relacional, composicionista, como ele mesmo chamou-a, não faz muito sentido pensar que os debates são vencidos em função do valor de verdade absoluta dos enunciados. Faz muito mais sentido colocar atenção nas estratégias e efeitos pragmáticos de cada debate do que defender uma ideia a ferro e fogo, independentemente de quem sejam os interlocutores. Se tudo é político, como nos mostram o feminismo, os estudos sociais da ciência e da tecnologia, a filosofia da ciência e tantos outros campos de pensamento, é politicamente irresponsável assumir uma atitude positivista sobre o mundo, ainda mais em um momento de transformação tão difícil.

Mas não é só isso. Existem arenas de debate em que o contexto e a lógica de organização semiótica da interação podem desfigurar, de antemão, uma ideia. Lyotard falou sobre essa questão em seu livro Le différend[28]; o grupo de antropólogos da linguagem e da semiótica vinculados aos trabalhos sobre metapragmática de Michael Silverstein[29] também trabalhou extensamente sobre o assunto. Em cada momento da luta política, os avanços se dão através de alianças e movimentos cuidadosamente construídos, em função do caminho que se está seguindo, e não de alguma lógica metafísica transcendente. É assim que se caminha, honrando as alianças e caminhando devagar, com a certeza de que o próprio caminhar transforma as perspectivas.

Vou dar um exemplo mais concreto: um bocado do que vai ocorrer no que diz respeito ao meio ambiente daqui a vinte anos está sendo definido nos assentos de cursos universitários no presente. Ocorre que as pessoas ocupando os assentos dos cursos de ecologia, biologia e afins têm menos poder neste processo de plasmar o futuro do que as que ocupam os assentos dos cursos de engenharia, direito, economia e agronomia. Se quisermos que o sistema de agricultura extensiva baseada em monocultura e agrotóxico deixe de existir, não basta este debate ocorrer nos cursos ligados à ecologia e às humanidades. Ele tem que ocorrer nos cursos de agronomia. O mesmo se dá com relação à mineração ou a questões energéticas e os cursos de engenharia, a questões ligadas aos direitos ambientais e das populações tradicionais e os cursos de direito, e a ideia de crescimento econômico e os cursos de economia. Dito isso, se eu chegar em um curso de engenharia com as ideias da Haraway sobre simpoiése e materialismo sensível, no mínimo não serei tomado a sério. É nisso que as alianças e movimentos têm que ser estratégicos. Não há nada mais importante, hoje, do que fazer este debate sobre o Antropoceno, da forma como os autores que eu mencionei aqui o entendem, nas faculdades de engenharia, economia, direito, agronomia e outras; mas para que eu possa fazer isso, preciso construir alianças dentro destas comunidades. E estas alianças, vistas de longe e sem a compreensão da dimensão estratégica do movimento, podem parecer retrocesso ou essencialismo estratégico. Uma diferença importante aqui é que, no caso de essencialismo estratégico, não existe a abertura para efetivamente escutar quem está do outro lado da interlocução. Em uma abordagem relacional de cunho composicionista, as alianças implicam, no mínimo, a escuta mútua, e isso tem o poder de transformar os membros da aliança. É essa abertura à vida e à transformação, característica das ontologias relacionais, que está ausente na ideia de essencialismo estratégico.

Voltando então ao Latour, o que me parece que ele está tentando fazer, em seus últimos dois livros, é reordenar a dimensão metapragmática dos debates internacionais, ou seja, reordenar os marcos de referência usados pelas pessoas para dar sentido aos problemas correntes. Um bocado de gente existe em uma situação de inércia com relação aos sistemas e infraestruturas dominantes – em como consomem ou votam, por exemplo – mas que estão potencialmente (cosmo)politicamente alinhados com o que ele chama de “terranos”. Seu objetivo é tirar estas pessoas de sua inércia perceptiva e afetiva, através do reordenamento simbólico dos elementos que organizam o debate. Ao mesmo tempo, Latour reconhece que não se trata apenas de ideias e regras de interação: instituições e infraestruturas são elementos fundamentais da composição dos mundos, e que precisam ser transformados. Daí a quantidade imensa de atividades extra-acadêmicas às quais Latour se dedica.

Talvez mais controvertido até do que esta questão do essencialismo estratégico é o movimento recente de insistir na necessidade de composição de um mundo comum. Essa defesa da composição do mundo comum é entendida por muitos como um retrocesso com relação às ideias de multiverso e multinaturalismo, de Viveiros de Castro. Talvez seja, uma vez mais, uma desaceleração e um desvio de percurso, no intuito de construir alianças importantes que demandam essas ações. Veremos. O debate está em curso.

6) Como você vê o futuro próximo dos estudos sobre o Antropoceno e, de maneira geral, das questões ecológicas no mundo lusoparlante e, em particular, no Brasil? Há novos projetos no horizonte que gostaria de mencionar? Que formas de intervenção são possíveis nos debates, não apenas dentro da academia mas também em níveis políticos mais amplos?

Há muita coisa acontecendo; não há dúvida que estamos em um momento de grandes transformações. Por essa razão, é muito difícil fazer previsões.

A condição do meio ambiente no Brasil, no governo Bolsonaro, é calamitosa, e não há qualquer sinal de que as coisas irão melhorar nos dois anos que ainda faltam para as próximas eleições. O país está à deriva. É impressionante, no entanto, que o país seja capaz de permanecer à deriva sem que tudo termine em anomia. Isso significa que existe alguma coisa além das estruturas de governo e do estado. É preciso seguir lutando, com todas as forças, para tirar o Bolsonaro do poder, e ao mesmo tempo é preciso abandonar o culto à figura do presidente que existe no Brasil. A situação atual do Brasil é paradoxal porque, ao mesmo tempo que aos sofrimentos trazidos pela pandemia se somam os sofrimentos trazidos por este governo, a vitalidade da sociedade civil, dos movimentos sociais e do ativismo ambiental é imensa.

Aqui acho que podemos fazer aqui um paralelo com uma das dimensões da questão do Antropoceno: ele pegou o mundo ocidental de surpresa, o que significa que há coisas bem à nossa frente que não somos capazes de perceber por muito tempo. Se assumirmos o início do Antropoceno com as detonações nucleares da década de 1940, vão-se aí mais de 70 anos e ainda não há reconhecimento científico institucionalizado sobre o fato. Não faz sentido dizer que já “se sabia” de sua existência porque Arrhenius tinha falado sobre isso em 1896. Uma voz perdida nos salões acadêmicos não pode ser tomada como percepção coletiva da realidade. E nem se pode reduzir o tempo que demorou para o reconhecimento do problema ao negacionismo, de forma anacrônica. O fato é que as ciências do sistema terrestre nos mostram que há inúmeros padrões de variação no funcionamento do planeta que não conhecemos, e que nos afetam diretamente. Até a década de 1920, a ciência não conhecia o fenômeno El Niño, que afeta o clima do planeta inteiro. Certamente há muitos El Niños que ainda não conhecemos, e alguns que nunca seremos capazes de conhecer com o aparato cognitivo que possuímos. O mesmo ocorre com fenômenos sociais. Há transformações e padrões no funcionamento das coletividades que não conhecemos, mas a que estamos sujeitos. Coisas imprevistas ocorrem o tempo todo no mundo social. No Brasil, por exemplo, ninguém anteviu as manifestações de 2013, e tampouco previu tamanho reconhecimento público e projeção das lideranças indígenas no país neste ano de 2020. Nem que este seria o ano em que, pela primeira vez na história brasileira, haveria mais candidatos pretos e pardos do que brancos nas eleições municipais. Eu sinceramente pensei que não veria isso acontecer nesta vida.  

Por isso acho improdutivo reduzir o contexto brasileiro atual ao Bolsonaro. Isso é seguir cultuando o estado, de certa forma, e reproduzir uma visão de mundo antropocêntrica. Há coisas importantes, inclusive nas dimensões tradicionalmente chamadas de sociais, que não acontecem na escala dos indivíduos nem na escala dos estados. Esta é exatamente uma das dimensões do Antropoceno. Reconhecer isso talvez diminua a amargura e a negatividade com que a intelectualidade progressista brasileira tem observado a realidade.

Em termos do que se vê no horizonte, o quadro é confuso, mas gosto de manter a minha atenção voltada aos fatos que sugerem que mudanças positivas estão ocorrendo. Vejamos: a ONU tem um secretário geral efetivamente comprometido com a agenda ambiental, e está sinalizando em direção à inclusão de indicadores ambientais nos índices usados para avaliar a situação dos países, como o IDH. O Papa Francisco é um ambientalista de esquerda. Trump perdeu as eleições nos EUA, e isso pode ter efeito cascata sobre a política no resto do mundo. A pandemia, a despeito da dimensão impensável de sofrimento que trouxe, forçou os mecanismos de governança planetários a se redesenharem e melhorarem seus processos. Mostrou ainda que a colaboração científica pode ocorrer sem ser induzida, e deformada, pela competição capitalista. A pandemia também deixou bastante evidente a necessidade da luta pelos comuns, inclusive entre grupos mais conservadores. As elites conservadoras abandonaram, por exemplo, a ideia de privatizar o sistema público de saúde brasileiro, o maior do mundo.

No Brasil, enquanto a ciência e a universidade são estranguladas pelo governo atual e resistem bravamente, os movimentos sociais, as periferias, a arte de rua e as iniciativas de solidariedade associadas à pandemia demonstram uma energia impressionante. O movimento da agroecologia tem ganhado muita força no país, também. Acho que, no curto prazo, haverá mais avanço vindo dessas áreas do que da academia. Mas coisas importantes estão ocorrendo no campo acadêmico, também. O que me está mais próximo é a experiência dos bacharelados interdisciplinares, nos quais efetivamente há um esforço de superação das barreiras disciplinares no tratamento de questões importantes. Sou professor em um bacharelado interdisciplinar em ciência e tecnologia do mar, onde os estudantes são preparados para lidar com as questões ambientais a partir de suas dimensões físicas, ecológicas, mas também filosóficas e sociológicas. Esta tem sido uma experiência muito positiva, e que me ajuda a ter esperança sobre o futuro.

Recebido em: 24/12/2020.
Aprovado em: 26/12/2020.
Publicado em: 26/12/2020.


[1] Professor de Antropologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp). Orcid ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9935-6183. E-mail: renzo.taddei@unifesp.br

[2] Professor no Departamento de Ciências Sociais Aplicadas da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (FCT-UNL). Orcid ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1111-1286. E-mail: d.scarso@fct.unl.pt

[3] Pesquisador PNPD/CAPES e Professor-Colaborador no Programa de Pós-Graduação em Filosofia da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul – PUCRS. Orcid ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3295-9454. E-mail: npcastanheira@gmail.com

[4] Haraway, Donna. “Anthropocene, capitalocene, plantationocene, chthulucene: Making kin.” Environmental humanities 6.1 (2015): 159-165.

[5] Morton, Timothy. Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World. U of Minnesota Press, 2013.

[6] Danowski, Déborah, and Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. Há mundo por vir? Ensaio sobre os medos e os fins. Cultura e Barbárie Editora, 2014.

[7] Latour, Bruno, and Steve Woolgar. A vida de laboratório: a produção dos fatos científicos. Rio de Janeiro: Relume Dumará, 1997

[8] Haraway, D. 2016. Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene. Durham: Duke University Press.

[9] Latour, Bruno. Onde aterrar? Rio de Janeiro: Bazar do Tempo, 2020.

[10] Viveiros de Castro, Eduardo. Metafísicas canibais. São Paulo: Cosac Naify, 2015.

[11] Viveiros de Castro, Eduardo. “Perspectivismo e multi-naturalismo na América indígena.” In: A inconstância da alma selvagem e outros ensaios de antropologia. São Paulo: Cosac Naify, 2002: 345-399.

[12] Taddei, Renzo. “No que está por vir, seremos todos filósofos-engenheiros-dançarinos ou não seremos nada.” Moringa 10.2 (2019): 65-90.

[13] Viveiros de Castro, Eduardo. 2004. “Perspectival Anthropology and the Method of Controlled Equivocation.” Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America 2 (1): 1.

[14] Almeida, Mauro William Barbosa. Caipora e outros conflitos ontológicos. Revista de Antropologia da UFSCar, v. 5, n. 1, p.7-28, 2013

[15] Kopenawa, Davi e Bruce Albert, A Queda do Céu: Palavras de um Xamã Yanomami. São Paulo: Companhia das Letras, 2015.

[16] Krenak, Ailton. Ideias para adiar o fim do mundo. Editora Companhia das Letras, 2019; Krenak, Ailton. O amanhã não está à venda. Companhia das Letras, 2020.

[17] IPBES. 2019. Summary for policymakers of the global assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Edited by S. Díaz, J. Settele, E. S. Brondízio E.S., et al. Bonn, Germany: IPBES secretariat.

[18] Taddei, Renzo. “Kopenawa and the Environmental Sciences in the Amazon.” In Philosophy on Fieldwork: Critical Introductions to Theory and Analysis in Anthropological Practice, edited by Nils Ole Bubandt and Thomas Schwarz Wentzer. London: Routledge, no prelo.

[19] Para uma análise surpreendente da importância filosófica do pensamento ameríndio, especialmente o de Davi Kopenawa, ver Valentin, M.A. Extramundanidade e Sobrenatureza. Florianópolis: Cultura e Barbárie, 2018.

[20] Puig de la Bellacasa, M. 2017. Matters of Care: Speculative Ethics in More Than Human Worlds. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

[21] Taddei, Renzo, and Sophie Haines. “Quando climatologistas encontram cientistas sociais: especulações etnográficas sobre equívocos interdisciplinares.” Sociologias 21.51 (2019).

[22] Bourdieu, Pierre. Esquisse d’une théorie de la pratique. Précédé de trois études d’ethnologie kabyle. Le Seuil, 2018.

[23] Latour, Bruno. Jamais fomos modernos. Editora 34, 1994.

[24] Kuhn, Thomas S. A estrutura das revoluções científicas. Editora Perspectiva, 2020.

[25] Lyotard, Jean-François. A condição pós-moderna. J. Olympio, 1998.

[26] Beck, Ulrich. Sociedade de risco: rumo a uma outra modernidade. Editora 34, 2011.

[27] Funtowicz, Silvio, and Jerry Ravetz. “Ciência pós-normal e comunidades ampliadas de pares face aos desafios ambientais.” História, ciências, saúde-Manguinhos 4.2 (1997): 219-230.

[28] Lyotard, Jean-François, Le différend, Paris, Éd. de Minuit, 1983.

[29] Silverstein, Michael. “Metapragmatic discourse and metapragmatic function” In Lucy, John ed. Reflexive language: Reported speech and metapragmatics. Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Kamyla Borges: A hora e a vez da eficiência energética (Folha de S.Paulo)

www1.folha.uol.com.br

15 de dezembro de 2020

Kamyla Borges – Coordenadora do Programa de Eficiência Energética do Instituto Clima e Sociedade (ICS)


O custo da energia pesa, cada vez mais, no bolso das pessoas e do setor produtivo brasileiro. Uma das razões é que o Brasil a usa mal. O país é o único, entre as economias do G20, cujo consumo de energia cresce mais que a produção econômica.

Em relatório recente, a Agência Internacional de Energia (IEA) mostra que países como China e Índia, mesmo tendo ampliado sua indústria energointensiva recentemente, conseguiram quedas sucessivas nas suas intensidades energéticas com a priorização de políticas e medidas de eficiência energética.

Acomodado na falsa percepção de abundante oferta de energia elétrica, o Brasil patina em eficiência energética. Com isso, perdemos todos. A maior parte das geladeiras vendidas no país, por exemplo, usa tecnologias de 20 anos atrás. Muitas indústrias dependem de motores velhos. E as mesmas empresas que fornecem equipamentos obsoletos para o mercado doméstico exportam produtos de alta eficiência. Uma prova clara de que nossa ineficiência se dá por falta de política pública orientada para o melhor interesse público.

Nesse jogo perdemos várias vezes. Como consumidores, porque pagamos uma conta de luz cada vez mais cara. Como agentes produtivos, porque arcamos com custos crescentes de produção. Como parte de uma economia cada vez menos competitiva, com menos empregos, oportunidades e inovações.

Em todos os lugares em que a eficiência energética cresce, o Estado nacional tem um papel importante, que se resume a favorecer equipamentos, sistemas e processos eficientes. E há um papel importante para cada um. Ao Congresso Nacional cabe agilizar a aprovação do Projeto de Lei do Senado (PLS) 232/2018, que estabelece a reforma estrutural do setor elétrico, abrindo espaço para o desenvolvimento de um mercado mais dinâmico para a eficiência energética. À Agência Nacional de Energia Elétrica, reformular e dar efetividade ao Programa de Eficiência Energética, estabelecendo prioridades, metas quantitativas, critérios objetivos e transparência ao uso desse recurso dos consumidores. Ao Ministério de Minas e Energia, atualizar e ampliar os padrões mínimos de eficiência energética para equipamentos, começando por aqueles que mais pesam hoje aos consumidores: refrigeradores e ar-condicionado. Prédios e equipamentos públicos —serviços de iluminação, condicionamento e refrigeração— deveriam ser “eficientizados”.

No setor financeiro, há todo um universo de instrumentos que vão de fundos garantidores a certificados (verdes, branco) e derivativos. A estruturação desses instrumentos colocaria a eficiência energética no merecido terreno dos investimentos. Aumentar a produção e criar empregos é prioridade. O Brasil tem todos os elementos para fazer isso com aumento de eficiência, produtividade e baixa emissão de carbono. Devemos garantir continuidade, resiliência e sustentabilidade. Não deixemos passar essa oportunidade.

Human-Made Stuff Doubles in Mass Every 20 Years. It Just Crossed a Disturbing Line (Science Alert)

sciencealert.com

Mike McRae, 10 December 2020


All of the Amazon’s splendid greenery. Every fish in the Pacific. Every microbe underfoot. Every elephant on the plains, every flower, fungus, and fruit-fly in the fields, no longer outweighs the sheer amount of stuff humans have made.

Estimates on the total mass of human-made material suggest 2020 is the year we overtake the combined dry weight of every living thing on Earth.

Go back to a time before humans first took to ploughing fields and tending livestock, and you’d find our planet was coated in a biosphere that weighed around 2 x 10^12 tonnes.

Thanks in no small part to our habit of farming, mining, and building highways where forests once grew, this figure has now halved.

According to a small team of environmental researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, the mass of items constructed by humans – everything from skyscrapers to buttons – has grown so much, this year could be the point when biomass and mass production match up.

The exact timing of this landmark event depends on how we define the exact point a chunk of rock or drop of crude oil changes from natural resource to manufactured item.

But given we’re currently rearranging roughly 30 gigatonnes of nature into anything from IKEA bookcases to luxury apartments each year (a rate that’s been doubling every 20 years since the early 1900s), such fuzziness will be arbitrary soon enough.

biomass of plants and animals compared with plastic and construction massKey components of dry biomass and anthropogenic mass in the year 2020. (Elhacham et al., Nature, 2020)

The researchers draw our attention to this depressing moment in history as a symbol of our growing dominance over the planet.

“Beyond biomass, as the global effect of humanity accelerates, it is becoming ever more imperative to quantitatively assess and monitor the material flows of our socioeconomic system, also known as the socio-economic metabolism,” the researchers write in their report.

Concern over society’s metaphorical expanding waistline isn’t new. Researchers have been crunching the numbers on humanity’s gluttony for energy and raw materials for years.

When it comes to calculating the mass of resources being gobbled up by our industrial complexes, past studies have generally focussed their estimates on primary productivity.

This isn’t really all that surprising. From mowing down forests for agriculture to plundering the oceans for their fish stocks, we’re increasingly aware that our hunger for T-bone steaks and convenient tins of tuna in spring water comes at a great ecological cost.

While it’s important to keep the greener parts of our environment in mind, this study shows why our insatiable hunger for sand, concrete, and asphalt shouldn’t be ignored, given the contribution infrastructure makes to our overall consumption.

“The anthropogenic mass, whose accumulation is documented in this study, does not arise out of the biomass stock but from the transformation of the orders-of-magnitude higher stock of mostly rocks and minerals,” the team notes.

The numbers can be hard to visualise. If the total mass of all humans exceeds 300 million tonnes, we could say there’s another 3.8 tonnes of cookware, jumbo jets, microwaves and backyard swimming pools on Earth each year for every single one of us.

Yet not all of us have an equal share in the benefits of this growth, nor do we all have the same influence over it.

Given our obsession with economic growth plays a major factor in our increasing rate of consumption, slowing it down will require rethinking the very foundations of how we function as a global society.

The prognosis of a future that’s more concrete than forest is far from novel. But with 2020 serving as a symbolic crossroads into a new epoch of human consumption, there’s no better time to act.

This research was published in Nature.

Água (sim, água) começa a ser negociada no mercado futuro de commodities (Come Ananás)

comeananas.com

por Hugo Souza, 09.dez.2020


Com a loucura fingindo que isso é normal, a água começou a ser negociada na última segunda-feira, 7, na Nasdaq, no mercado futuro de commodities, como o petróleo e o ouro.

O nome do índice é Nasdaq Veles California Water, que, segundo a Nasdaq, “oferece maior transparência e soluções inovadoras de gestão de risco para os indivíduos e entidades que dependem dos mercados de água para alinhar a oferta e a procura”.

O ticker é NQH2O e, na segunda, 1.233 metros cúbicos de água valiam no mercado futuro US$ 486,53, fechando o dia com valorização de 1,06%. Por mais que vinculado à precificação das reservas de água da Califórnia, a tendência é que o NQH2O seja usado como referência para o resto do mundo.

“Em períodos de condições hidrológicas secas e oferta limitada de água, o índice responde à pressão de alta sobre o preço. A mesma relação é verdadeira em períodos de condições hidrológicas úmidas e excesso de oferta de água”, informa ainda a Nasdaq.

O “conceito original para indexação do preço da água” é um oferecimento da Nasdaq em parceria com a Veles Water, “empresa de produtos financeiros especializada em precificação da água, produtos financeiros da água, além de metodologias econômicas e financeiras da água”.

“Os futuros” do Nasdaq Veles California Water Index são negociados por meio do CME Group, vulgo Bolsa de Chicago. Em seu site, o CME Group participa que o NQH2O é “uma solução clara para a gestão de risco do preço da água. Agora disponível”.

Insípida, inodora, incolor e produto financeiro “agora disponível” para os fundos globais de investimento.

Os Xapiri Yanomami sopram no Congresso Nacional (Instituto Socioambiental)

segunda-feira, 07 de Dezembro de 2020

Intervenção artística com desenhos de Joseca Yanomami marca a entrega da petição #ForaGarimpoForaCovid a deputados federais e demais autoridades

Por Oswaldo Braga de Souza*

Poesia e política se somaram no encerramento da campanha #ForaGarimpoForaCovid, liderada pelo Fórum de Lideranças Yanomami e Ye’kwana. Para marcar o fim do capítulo mais recente da luta dos indígenas pela expulsão dos mais de 20 mil garimpeiros de suas terras, os coordenadores da Hutukara Associação Yanomami, Dário Kopenawa e Maurício Ye’kwana, entregaram a representantes do Parlamento brasileiro um abaixo-assinado com quase 440 mil assinaturas de apoiadores em todo o mundo.

À noite, em uma intervenção artística inédita, frases em defesa da floresta e desenhos dos xapiri, os espíritos Yanomami, foram projetados na fachada do Congresso por quase duas horas. As ilustrações são do artista Joseca Yanomami e o texto é do líder indigena Davi Kopenawa.

*Consulte a ficha ténica abaixo

Os xapiri são os espíritos que auxiliam os xamãs em seu árduo trabalho de manter o equilíbrio do mundo e o próprio céu em seu lugar. São figuras centrais na cosmologia Yanomami, e se materializam para os xamãs como os espíritos dos animais, das árvores, das águas, de tudo o que existe na Urihi a, a “terra-floresta”, conceito Yanomami que engloba a floresta e todos os seus habitantes físicos e metafísicos.

O objetivo da campanha é exigir a retirada de milhares de garimpeiros da Terra Indígena (TI) Yanomami (AM/RR) para impedir a disseminação da Covid-19, a contaminação do solo e dos rios e o degradação florestal. O garimpo está espalhando a doença na área, segundo relatório produzido pelo Fórum de Lideranças Yanomami e Ye’kwana e a Rede Pró-Yanomami e Ye’kwana, também encaminhado aos parlamentares.

Mais de um terço das 26,7 mil pessoas que moram na TI foi exposto ao novo coronavírus e o número de casos confirmados saltou de 335 para 1,2 mil, entre agosto e outubro, um aumento de mais de 250%, ainda conforme o levantamento. Apesar disso, menos de 5% da população foi testada.

A petição foi apresentada numa reunião virtual das frentes parlamentares de defesa dos direitos indígenas e ambientalista, com a presença de deputados federais e senadores. O evento foi organizado para discutir o aumento do garimpo e seus impactos nos territórios yanomami, kayapó e munduruku e contou com a participação de parlamentares, líderes indígenas, procuradores da República, pesquisadores e organizações da sociedade civil.

“Chega de sofrer. Já perdemos muitos parentes”

“Chega de sofrer. Já perdemos muitos parentes. Temos xawara [Covid-19]. Os Yanomami estão contaminados pelo garimpo, nossos rios estão poluídos, contaminados com mercúrio”, afirmou Dário Kopenawa. “Queremos que as autoridades tomem providências. Não queremos mais perder nossos velhos, nossos filhos, não queremos mais chorar. Queremos que as autoridades retirem os garimpeiros o mais rápido possível”, continuou.

“Ao longo desses meses, alertamos as autoridades sobre os impactos que sofremos
com os garimpeiros que invadem nossa terra”, diz carta lida por Maurício Ye’kwana na reunião. “Mas nosso recado não foi escutado. Os garimpeiros continuam entrando em nossas casas”, seguiu a liderança.

“Um absurdo dizer que defender Terras Indígenas, defender indígena, se manifestar contra os garimpos em Terras Indígenas é uma questão ideológica, de esquerda ou de comunista. Isso é lei. Isso é direito. Está na nossa Constituição”, afirmou a deputada federal e coordenadora da Frente Parlamentar em Defesa dos Direitos dos Povos Indígenas, Joênia Wapichana (Rede-RR). “Essa petição é mais uma forma de reivindicar nada além do que está na Constituição, que é o direito à proteção à vida, o direito à terra, o direito de ter sua terra sem invasões”, afirmou.

Joênia lembrou que a TI Yanomami abriga grupos indígenas isolados, os Moxihatëtëa, que correm risco de desaparecer caso sejam contatados por não indígenas e contaminados por doenças para os quais não têm defesas imunológicas, como gripe e sarampo. A Covid-19 representa um risco ainda maior para essas comunidades em virtude da dificuldade para atendimento e transporte de doentes em regiões remotas e de difícil acesso, como é o caso da área.

Estímulo ao garimpo

O governo Bolsonaro não só não fez nada para retirar os invasores do território yanomami como estimula abertamente o garimpo em TIs, o que é ilegal. O Planalto enviou um Projeto de Lei ao Congresso, em fevereiro, para regulamentar a atividade nessas áreas, além da mineração industrial e a construção de hidrelétricas. O resultado é o aumento da presença garimpeira, dos conflitos envolvendo sua atividade e do desmatamento nos territórios indígenas em geral, nos últimos dois anos.

“A responsabilidade pelo aumento das invasões está diretamente relacionada à complacência deste governo com a criminalidade, a desestruturação dos órgãos de fiscalização e controle e com a omissão em cumprir decisões judiciais”, criticou, na reunião, a advogada do ISA Juliana de Paula Batista. Ela lembrou que a Justiça Federal determinou que a União apresente um plano de retirada dos garimpeiros da TI Yanomami e o STF ordenou a implantação de barreiras sanitárias na área. Nenhuma das duas decisões foi cumprida.

“É fundamental que as casas legislativas estejam comprometidas com a defesa e proteção dos povos indígenas e em assegurar seus direitos, previstos na Constituição”, concluiu.

Em agosto, o Supremo Tribunal Federal (STF) confirmou uma liminar do ministro Luís Roberto Barroso que obriga o governo a agir para conter a escalada da crise de saúde entre os povos indígenas. A única medida incluída no pedido original da ação e não atendida foi justamente a retirada imediata de invasores de sete TIs, entre elas a Yanomami. Barroso criou um grupo de trabalho para acompanhar as providências da administração federal. O ministro determinou que fossem refeitos os planos oficiais de enfrentamento geral da Covid-19 e de instalação de barreiras sanitárias nas TIs. O movimento indígena segue aguardando uma medida mais enérgica para forçar o governo a retirar os invasores das sete áreas.

Munduruku

“Querem legalizar o garimpo, como se isso fosse resolver o problema da população indígena. Isso só vai piorar a situação. O garimpo traz prostituição e drogas para o territorio”, criticou, na reunião do dia 03 de dezembro, Alessandra Korap Munduruku, líder indígena ameaçada de morte pelas denúncias contra os invasores da TI Sawré Muybu, no sudoeste do Pará. Em outubro, ela ganhou o prêmio Robert F. Kennedy de Direitos Humanos, dos EUA.

“A maioria dos indígenas tem de beber água suja do rio. Todas as nascentes estão sendo desmatadas para uso dos garimpos. Vemos máquinas, dragas cavando o fundo do rio, enquanto os indígenas têm de comer o peixe. Teremos de comprar peixes na cidade para levar para as aldeias? Teremos de comprar água na cidade para levar para as aldeias. O que será dos indígenas depois de legalizarem o garimpo?”, questionou Alessandra Munduruku.

Ainda na reunião, o WWF-Brasil apresentou parte dos resultados de um estudo realizado pela organização em conjunto com a Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz) sobre contaminação do mercúrio em três aldeias da TI Sawré Muybu.

Os dados revelam uma situação dramática. O mercúrio foi detectado em 100% da população e, em 60% dela, o nível da substância não foi considerado seguro.
Em 100% das amostras de peixes, havia resquícios do elemento químico. Em algumas, havia 18 vezes mais mercúrio do que o máximo tolerado pelos critérios da agência ambiental dos EUA.

Em quatro de cada 10 crianças foram identificadas altas concentrações de mercúrio. Em 16% das crianças, foram detectados problemas de neurodesenvolvimento. “As crianças estão perdendo a saúde. Isso é um crime gravíssimo contra as crianças indígenas! Quando Alesssandra Munduruku fala em genocídio, ela não está exagerando”, afirmou Bruno Taitson, representante do WWF-Brasil.

* Com informações de Ester Cezar

Ficha técnica:

O SOPRO DOS XAPIRI
XAPIRI PË NË MARI
2020
animação em três canais projetada no Palácio do Congresso Nacional
01:39”

Desenhos: Joseca Yanomami

Frases: Davi Kopenawa Yanomami

Cantos: Ehuana Yaiara Yanomami, Levi Malamahi Alaopeteri Yanomami, Tafarel Yanomami – captados por Marcos Wesley de Oliveira na aldeia Watorikɨ. Outros registros sonoros captados por Gustavo Fioravante, em Watorikɨ.

Realização: Fórum de Lideranças Yanomami e Ye’kwana e Instituto Socioambiental

Apoio: Hutukara Associação Yanomami

Criação, direção e roteiro: Gisela Motta, Isabella Guimarães e Mariana Lacerda [Barreira Y.]

Animação e montagem: JR Muniz e Leandro Mendes – Vigas

Video mapping em Brasília, direção técnica: Alexis Anastasiou

Equipamentos: Visual Farm / Paralax

Captação em Brasília: Bruna Carolli, Cleber Machado, Daniel Basil, Ester Cezar, Guto Martins, Paulo Comar, Victor Ekstrom

Edição e áudio: Cauê Ito

Agradecimentos: aos povos Yanomami e Ye’kwana, Ana Teixeira, André Komatsu, Bruno Rangel, Carlo Zacquini, Claudia Andujar, Gui Conti, Irina Theophilo, Joana Amador, Juliana Calheiros, Kauê Lima, Laura Andreato, Lucas Bambozzi, Peter Pál Pelbart, Pio Figueiroa, Rede Pró-Yanomami e Ye’kwana, Rivane Neuenschwander, Tuíra Kopenawa Yanomami, Vitor Osório

Total de objetos construídos pela humanidade supera, pela 1ª vez, a massa dos seres vivos na Terra (Folha de S.Paulo)

www1.folha.uol.com.br

Reinaldo José Lopes, 9 de dezembro de 2020


O total dos objetos construídos pela humanidade acaba de superar pela primeira vez a massa somada das formas de vida na Terra, mostra um levantamento liderado por pesquisadores israelenses.

A chamada massa antropogênica, como decidiram designá-la, ultrapassou a marca de 1,1 teratonelada (ou 1,1 trilhão de toneladas) em 2020 e tem dobrado de tamanho a cada 20 anos ao longo do último século, segundo os autores do estudo.

A transformação de matérias-primas naturais em artefatos humanos cresceu de forma tão vertiginosa que, a cada semana, os novos objetos feitos pela nossa espécie superam o peso corporal de cada pessoa viva hoje, afirma a pesquisa, que acaba de ser publicada na revista científica Nature por uma equipe do Instituto Weizmann de Ciência.

“Precisaríamos de décadas para reunir todos esses dados. Para nossa sorte, é algo que já está sendo explorado há anos por cientistas que trabalham na área de análise de fluxo de materiais”, explicou à Folha o coordenador do estudo, Ron Milo, do Departamento de Ciências Botânicas e Ambientais do Weizmann.

“Eles compilaram uma base de dados global, abrangendo todos os países e campos da indústria, e isso nos permitiu ter dados confiáveis sobre o tema”, diz Milo, cuja mãe nasceu no Brasil.

Para chegar à conclusão (que tem margem de erro de seis anos para mais ou para menos), Milo e seus colegas precisaram fazer uma série de delimitações metodológicas. De um lado, eles colocaram a soma de toda a biomassa viva —ou seja, a totalidade do que é produzido pelos seres vivos que ainda não morreram, incluindo árvores e demais vegetais, animais, fungos de tamanho macroscópico e todos os micro-organismos no solo e nas águas. A conta inclui também o peso de todos os seres humanos vivos hoje, e o de seus animais e plantas domesticados.

Do outro lado, a massa antropogênica é composta pela matéria não viva modificada diretamente pela ação do Homo sapiens: metal, concreto, tijolos, asfalto, plástico, vidro etc. (veja infográfico abaixo). Os pesquisadores optaram por usar o peso seco (desprezando a presença de água) de ambos os conjuntos.

No caso da massa antropogênica, eles só levaram em conta objetos que ainda não viraram lixo —se eles fossem incluídos, a produção humana teria “virado o jogo” em relação à biomassa já em 2013 (margem de erro de cinco anos a mais ou a menos), calcula o grupo. Também não colocaram na soma os materiais apenas deslocados pela ação do ser humano, mas ainda não usados diretamente para nada (como a terra removida para a construção de um reservatório, digamos).

Se a taxa atual de crescimento se mantiver, espera-se que a massa antropogênica alcance 3 teratoneladas em 2040, ou seja, o triplo da biomassa terrestre. As comparações caso a caso, porém, já são suficientemente assustadoras. A atual massa de plásticos, por exemplo, já equivale ao dobro da de todos os animais do planeta, enquanto o peso dos prédios e da infraestrutura (estradas etc.) superou o da totalidade das árvores e arbustos. A massa da Torre Eiffel, cartão-postal parisiense, equivale à de todos os 10 mil rinocerontes-brancos ainda existentes no mundo, enquanto a de Nova York empata com a de todos os peixes nos mares e rios da Terra.

A magnitude e a clareza dos dados podem se tornar um argumento em favor da definição oficial do chamado Antropoceno —a ideia de que a ação humana inaugurou uma nova fase geológica da história do planeta. No momento, o conceito está sendo debatido pela Comissão Internacional de Estratigrafia.

“Não somos parte da discussão oficial, mas estamos em contato com as pessoas envolvidas nela. Acho que, de fato, é questão de tempo até que o Antropoceno seja oficializado”, diz o cientista israelense.

Comissão Arns – Homenagem a Davi Kopenawa (Comissão Arns/UOL)

noticias.uol.com.br

08/12/2020 16h46


A eleição do líder Yanomami Davi Kopenawa como membro da Academia Brasileira de Ciências (ABC) é motivo de júbilo para a Comissão Arns. Em qualquer entidade científica no mundo, Davi brindará o conhecimento humano com a transmissão de saberes e sensibilidades que melhorariam a vida de todos no planeta. Davi tem sido voz incansável na defesa dos povos indígenas, das florestas que ardem em incêndios criminosos e dos recursos naturais que elas abrigam. Por sua ética e coragem, foi agraciado em 2019 com o Right Livelihood Foundation Award, conhecido como o Nobel alternativo. E, agora, vemos as portas da nossa academia centenária abrirem-se para ele. Congratulamos a ABC pela escolha. E saudamos o grande líder e xamã do povo Yanomami.

Aos leitores deste blog, a Comissão Arns oferece um presente: a íntegra de um testemunho recente de Davi Kopenawa, no qual que ele trata do cerco de garimpeiros e desmatadores na região do seu povo, acuando grupos indígenas isolados, como os Moxihatetea. Este texto foi distribuído, em três idiomas, na 43ª. Sessão do Conselho de Direitos Humanos da ONU, no início de março deste ano de 2020, em Genebra. Davi participou da sessão e de outros encontros presenciais, ao lado da Comissão Arns e do Instituto Socioambiental.

A invasão do território Yanomami e o risco de morte para os Moxihatetea

Tradução do Yanomami por Bruce Albert, antropólogo

As coisas estão assim. Agora os Brancos não vivem longe de nós. Eles não param de se aproximar. Na cidade vizinha de Boa Vista, chegam em muitos, sem trégua, exortando uns aos outros. Eles dizem entre eles: “Sim, vamos tomar para nós os bens preciosos dos Yanomami. Esses bens ainda não são mercadorias de verdade, porque estão escondidos sob os cascalhos da terra. Mas nós tomaremos essas riquezas, também as árvores da floresta e vamos nos instalar na Terra Yanomami!”. É o que os Brancos se dizem e é como eles mesmos se encorajam: “Venham para Boa vista! Eu, governo de Roraima, vou lhes dar trabalho! Vocês não serão mais pobres!”. Estas são as palavras deles. Com elas querem trocar seu dinheiro e suas mercadorias. Por isso, os Brancos não param de fixar seu olhar sobre a nossa floresta, todos eles, para tentar se apoderar. Eles dizem: “Sim, nós vamos tirar dinheiro da floresta. Como os Yanomami não sabem de nada, então, são nossas as riquezas”. É isso o que os Brancos falam ao encorajar seus trabalhadores a virem para a floresta. “Sim, podem ir! Não tenham medo! Os Yanomami parecem muitos, mas nós é que somos, de verdade! Mesmo que eles ataquem com flechas alguns de nós, ainda somos mais numerosos do que eles! “.

Dizendo esse tipo de coisa, eles crescem por toda a parte, na floresta, nos rios, nas terras. Eles querem pegar o ouro. E como o ouro vale cada vez mais, eles continuam a crescer, sem parar. Eles se dizem: “Sim, agora o valor do ouro está muito alto, então, vamos todos para a terra dos Yanomami!”. É assim que eles vão penetrando a floresta por todas as partes, através dos rios, pelos caminhos, com seus aviões e helicópteros. É assim que as coisas estão hoje em dia. Abriram portas de entrada nos cursos da água e também pelos ares. Desmataram para fazer pistas de aterrissagem por toda a parte. E também para fazer novos caminhos na floresta. Na bacia do Rio Apiaú, chegam em grande número. Através o rio Parimiú, também. Eles já foram expulsos de lá, mas voltaram ainda mais numerosos! Há também um outro caminho aberto, que sobe ao longo do Rio Catrimani.

Pelo caminho do Rio Apiaú eles se aproximaram do lugar onde vive o grupo isolado Moxihatetea. Nas nascentes do Rio Apiaú, onde vivem esses povos isolados, começaram a atacar e a destruir a floresta com seus rios. No início, eles estavam trabalhando com as mãos, mas agora usam máquinas. Descem as peças destas máquinas de um helicóptero para, depois, montar tudo no solo. Os Moxihatetea estão vigilantes, eles desejam ficar longe dos Brancos. Eles não conhecem esses garimpeiros e não querem se aproximar deles. Já fugiram algumas vezes, agora não podem mais fugir. Já se transferiram para a floresta profunda, muito longe dos caminhos, e lá ficaram em abrigos provisórios, como quando estavam em expedições de caça, longe de casa. Os garimpeiros então começaram a roubar a comida dos seus jardins – a mandioca, as bananas, as canas de açúcar, e fizeram isso quando as suas provisões de arroz, farinha e latas de conservas estavam esgotadas. Então os guerreiros Moxihatetea atacaram com flechas, mas os garimpeiros, mais violentos, responderam com fuzis. É o que se passou com os Moxihatetea isolados, e eu acho isso muito ruim.

Eles fugiram de novo subindo o rio, mas nessa direção há também garimpeiros instalados no Rio Catrimani, criando obstáculo. Os índios agora estão cercados. Por isso estou falando para defender os Moxihatetea. Eu não conheço as suas casas, assim como vocês também não conhecem. Eu só os vi do céu, pelo avião. Nunca pude visitá-los caminhando, a pé. Nunca nos falamos. É por isso que estou muito preocupado. Todos poderão ser rapidamente exterminados — é o que eu acho.

Os garimpeiros irão matá-los com seus fuzis e suas doenças, a malária, a pneumonia… Os indígenas não têm vacinas de proteção, vão todos morrer.

E não há só eles na terra-floresta Yanomami. Mais além, na região de Erico, vivem outros povos isolados. São como os Moxihatetea. E também, sobre a margem do Rio Catrimani, descendo o rio, nas fontes do Rio Xeriuini, há outros grupos isolados. E ainda num afluente do Rio Arca, no meio. É por isso que lutamos por eles. Estamos angustiados pelo possa acontecer.

Há outros isolados na floresta dos Waimiri-Atroari e há outros em toda a Amazônia! Vivem assim há muito tempo e querem continuar assim! São eles que cuidam verdadeiramente da floresta. São os Moxihatetea e todos os povos isolados da Amazônia que ainda guardam a última floresta. Mas os Brancos não sabem disso, porque eles não compreendem a língua desses povos. Os brancos apenas pensam: “O que eles estão fazendo aqui?” E quando os Brancos chegam, suas epidemias que chegam, também.

É por isso que digo a mim mesmo: “O que pensam os grandes homens brancos? Eles não querem nos deixar viver em paz e em boa saúde? Eles nos detestam, de verdade?”. É evidente que nos consideram como inimigos, porque somos outras gentes, somos habitantes da floresta. Fomos criados na floresta da Amazônia, no Brasil, e por isso os Brancos não nos conhecem. Eles se contentam em atacar e destruir nossa floresta como querem. Não é a terra deles, mas, declararam que é. Eles se dizem: “Esta floresta é nossa. Vamos arrancar o ouro do solo, cortar as suas árvores e vamos instalar aqui outros brancos que necessitam de terra, os criadores de gado, os colonos, e vamos então terminar com os Yanomami”.

Não é mais o que eles pensam, agora, é verdadeiramente o que eles dizem!

Sobre o presidente do Brasil, nem menciono o seu nome, mas posso dizer para ele: “Como você é o presidente, você deveria nos proteger”. Eu já conheço muito bem as palavras deste presidente: “Que venham todos os Brancos que queiram dinheiro, os criadores de gado, os forasteiros, os garimpeiros e os colonos, também. Eu vou dar a eles essa floresta, para terminar com todos os Yanomami, não importa quantos eles sejam, e para que os Brancos se tornem os proprietários. É nossa terra e tudo bem! E assim eu serei o único senhor desta terra!”. Essas são as suas palavras. Essas são as palavras daquele que se faz de grande homem no Brasil e se diz Presidente da República. É o que ele verdadeiramente diz: “Eu sou o dono dessa floresta, desses rios, desse subsolo, dos minérios, do ouro e das pedras preciosas! Tudo isso me pertence, então, vamos lá buscar tudo e trazer para a cidade. Tudo deve virar mercadorias!”.

É também o que os Brancos se dizem e é com estas palavras que destroem a floresta, desde sempre. Mas, hoje, eles estão prontos para terminar com o pouco que resta. Eles já destruíram os nossos caminhos, sujaram os nossos rios, envenenaram os peixes, queimaram as árvores e os animais que caçamos. Eles nos matam também com as suas epidemias.

Alguns Brancos têm pena de nós, mas não os seus Grandes Homens que afirmam que nós somos animais. Eles dizem: “São macacos, porcos selvagens!”. No entanto, são esses homens que não sabem pensar. Eles não sabem trabalhar na floresta, não conhecem seu poder de fertilidade në rope e nem querem conhecer. Não fazem outra coisa do que andar de um lado para o outro destruindo tudo. Eles só conhecem floresta do alto de suas máquinas satélites, que passam sobre as árvores, as nossas casas, os rios, as colinas, a beleza da floresta. Depois, eles chamam uns e outros: “Sim, venham por aqui. Nós todos do Brasil vamos tirar os bens preciosos! Nós vamos acumular tudo isso nas cidades! Nós vamos, de verdade, virar o Povo da Mercadoria! Não seremos mais pobres, vamos ter muitos bens!”. É o que eles dizem entre eles. E era isso que eu queria contar aqui. Essas gentes são indiferentes às palavras daqueles que defendem os Yanomami. Mesmo assim, envio essa mensagem.

Gostaria que os Direitos Humanos da ONU possam olhar para nós e nos dar um apoio forte para que as autoridades do Brasil – os políticos dos municípios, dos estados e da capital – todos esses Brancos das cidades, nos respeitem e não nos molestem mais. Que eles compreendam e reconheçam os direitos dos seres humanos, assim como a ONU. Os Direitos Humanos da ONU são construídos para defender os que sofrem. Então, eu gostaria que a ONU faça um bom trabalho, denunciando com muita força o que nos acontece, para que as autoridades do Brasil respeitem os Yanomami, os povos isolados e todos os povos ainda não reconhecidos.

Meu povo tem o direito de viver em paz e em boa saúde, porque ele vive em sua própria casa. Na floresta estamos em casa! Os Brancos não podem destruir nossa casa, senão, tudo isso não vai terminar bem para o mundo. Cuidamos da floresta para todos, não só para os Yanomami e os povos isolados. Trabalhamos com os nossos xamãs, que conhecem bem essas coisas, que possuem a sabedoria que vem do contato com a terra. A ONU precisa falar com as autoridades do Brasil para retirar – imediatamente – os garimpeiros que cercam os isolados e todos os outros em nossa floresta.

4 efeitos do racismo no cérebro e no corpo de crianças, segundo Harvard (BBC)

Paula Adamo Idoeta

Da BBC News Brasil em São Paulo

9 dezembro 2020, 06:01 -03

Criança com a mãe
Viver o racismo, direta ou indiretamente, tem efeitos de longo prazo sobre desenvolvimento, comportamento, saúde física e mental

Episódios diários de racismo, desde ser alvo de preconceito até assistir a casos de violência sofridos por outras pessoas da mesma raça, têm um efeito às vezes “invisível”, mas duradouro e cruel sobre a saúde, o corpo e o cérebro de crianças.

A conclusão é do Centro de Desenvolvimento Infantil da Universidade de Harvard, que compilou estudos documentando como a vivência cotidiana do racismo estrutural, de suas formas mais escancaradas às mais sutis ou ao acesso pior a serviços públicos, impacta “o aprendizado, o comportamento, a saúde física e mental” infantil.

No longo prazo, isso resulta em custos bilionários adicionais em saúde, na perpetuação das disparidades raciais e em mais dificuldades para grande parcela da população em atingir seu pleno potencial humano e capacidade produtiva.

Embora os estudos sejam dos EUA, dados estatísticos — além do fato de o Brasil também ter histórico de escravidão e desigualdade — permitem traçar paralelos entre os dois cenários.

Aqui, casos recentes de violência contra pessoas negras incluem o de Beto Freitas, espancado até a morte dentro de um supermercado Carrefour em Porto Alegre em 20 de novembro, e o das primas Emilly, 4, e Rebeca, 7, mortas por disparos de balas enquanto brincavam na porta de casa, em Duque de Caxias em 4 de dezembro.

No Brasil, 54% da população é negra, percentual que é de 13% na população dos EUA.

A seguir, quatro impactos do ciclo vicioso do racismo, segundo o documento de Harvard. Para discutir as particularidades disso no Brasil, a reportagem entrevistou a psicóloga Cristiane Ribeiro, autora de um estudo recente sobre como a população negra lida com o sofrimento físico e mental, que foi tema de sua dissertação de mestrado pelo Programa de Pós-graduação em Promoção da Saúde e Prevenção da Violência da UFMG.

1. Corpo em estado de alerta constante

O racismo e a violência dentro da comunidade (e a ausência de apoio para lidar com isso) estão entre o que Harvard chama de “experiências adversas na infância”. Passar constantemente por essas experiências faz com que o cérebro se mantenha em estado constante de alerta, provocando o chamado “estresse tóxico”.

“Anos de estudos científicos mostram que, quando os sistemas de estresse das crianças ficam ativados em alto nível por longo período de tempo, há um desgaste significativo nos seus cérebros em desenvolvimento e outros sistemas biológicos”, diz o Centro de Desenvolvimento Infantil da universidade.

Na prática, áreas do cérebro dedicadas à resposta ao medo, à ansiedade e a reações impulsivas podem produzir um excesso de conexões neurais, ao mesmo tempo em que áreas cerebrais dedicadas à racionalização, ao planejamento e ao controle de comportamento vão produzir menos conexões neurais.

Protesto pela morte de Beto Freitas, em Porto Alegre, 20 de novembro
Protesto pela morte de Beto Freitas, em Porto Alegre, 20 de novembro; assistir cenas de violência contra pessoas da mesma raça tem efeito traumático – é o chamado ‘racismo indireto’

“Isso pode ter efeito de longo prazo no aprendizado, comportamento, saúde física e mental”, prossegue o centro. “Um crescente corpo de evidências das ciências biológicas e sociais conecta esse conceito de desgaste (do cérebro) ao racismo. Essas pesquisas sugerem que ter de lidar constantemente com o racismo sistêmico e a discriminação cotidiana é um ativador potente da resposta de estresse.”

“Embora possam ser invisíveis para quem não passa por isso, não há dúvidas de que o racismo sistêmico e a discriminação interpessoal podem levar à ativação crônica do estresse, impondo adversidades significativas nas famílias que cuidam de crianças pequenas”, conclui o documento de Harvard.

2. Mais chance de doenças crônicas ao longo da vida

Essa exposição ao estresse tóxico é um dos fatores que ajudam a explicar diferenças raciais na incidência de doenças crônicas, prossegue o centro de Harvard:

“As evidências são enormes: pessoas negras, indígenas e de outras raças nos EUA têm, em média, mais problemas crônicos de saúde e vidas mais curtas do que as pessoas brancas, em todos os níveis de renda.”

Alguns dados apontam para situação semelhante no Brasil. Homens e mulheres negros têm, historicamente, incidência maior de diabetes — 9% mais prevalente em negros do que em brancos; 50% mais prevalente em negras do que em brancas, segundo o Ministério da Saúde — e pressão alta, por exemplo.

Os números mais marcantes, porém, são os de violência armada, como a que vitimou as meninas Emilly e Rebeca. O Atlas da Violência aponta que negros foram 75,7% das vítimas de homicídio no Brasil em 2018.

A taxa de homicídios de brasileiros negros é de 37,8 para cada 100 mil habitantes, contra 13,9 de não negros.

Há, ainda, uma incidência possivelmente maior de problemas de saúde mental: de cada dez suicídios em adolescentes em 2016, seis foram de jovens negros e quatro de brancos, segundo pesquisa do Ministério da Saúde publicada no ano passado.

“O adoecimento (pela vivência do racismo) é constante, e vemos nos dados escancarados, como os da violência, mas também na depressão, no adoecimento psíquico e nos altos números de suicídio”, afirma a psicóloga Cristiane Ribeiro.

Protesto pela morte de Beto Freitas
“Embora possam ser invisíveis para quem não passa por isso, não há dúvidas de que o racismo sistêmico e a discriminação interpessoal podem levar à ativação crônica do estresse, impondo adversidades significativas nas famílias que cuidam de crianças pequenas”, diz o documento de Harvard

“E por que essa é violência é tão marcante entre pessoas negras? Porque aprendemos que nosso semelhante é o pior possível e o quanto mais longe estivermos dele, melhor. A criança materializa isso de alguma forma. Temos estatísticas de que crianças negras são menos abraçadas na educação infantil, recebem menos afeto dos professores. (Algumas) ouvem desde cedo ‘esse menino não aprende mesmo, é burro’ ou ‘nasceu pra ser bandido'”, prossegue Ribeiro.

Embora muitos conseguem superar essa narrativa, outros têm sua vida marcada por ela, diz Ribeiro. “Trabalhei durante muito tempo no sistema socioeducativo (com jovens infratores), e essas sentenças são muito recorrentes: o menino que escuta desde pequeno que ‘não vai ser nada na vida’. São trajetórias sentenciadas.”

3. Disparidades na saúde e na educação

Os problemas descritos acima são potencializados pelo menor acesso aos serviços públicos de saúde, aponta Harvard.

“Pessoas de cor recebem tratamento desigual quando interagem em sistemas como o de saúde e educação, além de terem menos acesso a educação e serviços de saúde de alta qualidade, a oportunidades econômicas e a caminhos para o acúmulo de riqueza”, diz o documento do Centro de Desenvolvimento infantil.

“Tudo isso reflete formas como o legado do racismo estrutural nos EUA desproporcionalmente enfraquece a saúde e o desenvolvimento de crianças de cor.”

Mais uma vez, os números brasileiros apontam para um quadro parecido. Segundo levantamento do Ministério da Saúde, 67% do público do SUS (Sistema Único de Saúde) é negro. No entanto, a população negra realiza proporcionalmente menos consultas médicas e atendimentos de pré-natal.

E, entre os 10% de pessoas com menor renda no Brasil, 75% delas são pretas ou pardas.

Na educação, as disparidades persistem. Crianças negras de 0 a 3 anos têm percentual menor de matrículas em creches. Na outra ponta do ensino, 53,9% dos jovens declarados negros concluíram o ensino médio até os 19 anos — 20 pontos percentuais a menos que a taxa de jovens brancos, apontam dados de 2018 do movimento Todos Pela Educação.

Familiares das meninas Emilly e Rebecca, mortas a tiros,em encontro com o governador em exercício do Rio, Claudio Castro
Familiares das meninas Emilly e Rebecca, mortas a tiros,em encontro com o governador em exercício do Rio, Claudio Castro; Atlas da Violência aponta que negros foram 75,7% das vítimas de homicídio no Brasil em 2018

4. Cuidadores mais fragilizados e ‘racismo indireto’

Os efeitos do estresse não se limitam às crianças: se estendem também aos pais e responsáveis por elas — e, como em um efeito bumerangue, voltam a afetar as crianças indiretamente.

“Múltiplos estudos documentaram como os estresses da discriminação no dia a dia em pais e outros cuidadores, como ser associado a estereótipos negativos, têm efeitos nocivos no comportamento desses adultos e em sua saúde mental”, prossegue o Centro de Desenvolvimento Infantil.

Um dos estudos usados para embasar essa conclusão é uma revisão de dezenas de pesquisas clínicas feita em 2018, que aborda o que os pesquisadores chamam de “exposição indireta ao racismo”: mesmo quando as crianças não são alvo direto de ofensas ou violência racista, podem ficar traumatizadas ao testemunhar ou escutar sobre eventos que tenham afetado pessoas próximas a elas.

“Especialmente para crianças de minorias (raciais), a exposição frequente ao racismo indireto pode forçá-las a dar sentido cognitivamente a um mundo que sistematicamente as desvaloriza e marginaliza”, concluem os pesquisadores.

O estudo identificou, como efeito desse “racismo indireto”, impactos tanto em cuidadores (que tinham autoestima mais fragilizada) como nas crianças, que nasciam de mais partos prematuros, com menor peso ao nascer e mais chances de adoecer ao longo da vida ou de desenvolver depressão.

Na infância, diz a psicóloga Cristiane Ribeiro, é quando começamos a construir nossa capacidade de acreditar no próprio potencial para viver no mundo. No caso da população negra, essa construção é afetada negativamente pelos estereótipos racistas, sejam características físicas ou sociais — como o “cabelo pixaim” ou “serviço de preto”.

Homem penteando cabelo de menina negra
Valorização e representatividade impactam positivamente as crianças e, por consequência, suas famílias

“A gente precisa ter referências mais positivas da população negra como aquela que também é responsável pela constituição social do Brasil. A única representação que a gente tem no livro didático de história é de uma pessoa (escravizada) acorrentada, em uma situação de extrema vulnerabilidade e que está ali porque ‘não se esforçou para não estar'”, diz a pesquisadora.

Mesmo atos “sutis” — como pessoas negras sendo seguidas por seguranças em shopping centers ou recebendo atendimento pior em uma loja qualquer —, que muitas vezes passam despercebidos para observadores brancos, podem ter efeitos devastadores sobre a autoestima, prossegue Ribeiro.

“Isso que a gente costuma chamar de sutileza do racismo não tem nada de sutil na minha perspectiva. Quando alguém grita ‘macaco’ no meio da rua, as pessoas compartilham a indignação. É diferente do olhar (preconceituoso), que só o sujeito viu e só ele percebeu. Mesmo para a militante mais empoderada e ciente de seus direitos — porque é uma luta sem descanso —, tem dias que não tem jeito, esse olhar te destroça. A gente fala muito da força da mulher negra, mas e o direito à fragilidade? será que ser frágil também é um privilégio?”

Como romper o ciclo

“Avanços na ciência apresentam um retrato cada vez mais claro de como a adversidade forte na vida de crianças pequenas pode afetar o desenvolvimento do cérebro e outros sistemas biológicos. Essas perturbações iniciais podem enfraquecer as oportunidades dessas crianças em alcançar seu pleno potencial”, diz o documento de Harvard.

Mas é possível romper esse ciclo, embora lembrando que as formas de combatê-lo são complexas e múltiplas.

Cristiane Ribeiro
“A gente fala muito da força da mulher negra, mas e o direito à fragilidade? será que ser frágil também é um privilégio?”, diz Cristiane Ribeiro

“Precisamos criar novas estratégias para lidar com essas desigualdades que sistematicamente ameaçam a saúde e o bem-estar das crianças pequenas de cor e os adultos que cuidam delas. Isso inclui buscar ativamente e reduzir os preconceitos em nós e nas políticas socioeconômicas, por meio de iniciativas como contratações justas, oferta de crédito, programas de habitação, treinamento antipreconceito e iniciativas de policiamento comunitário”, diz o Centro de Desenvolvimento Infantil de Harvard.

Para Cristiane Ribeiro, passos fundamentais nessa direção envolvem mais representatividade negra e mais discussões sobre o tema dentro das escolas.

“Se tenho uma escola repleta de negros ou pessoas de diferentes orientações sexuais, mas isso não é dito, não é tratado, você tem a mesma segregação que nos outros espaços”, opina.

“Precisamos extinguir a ideia do ‘lápis cor de pele’. Tem tanta cor de pele, porque um lápis rosa a representa? Tem também a criança com cabelo crespo em uma escola onde só são penteados os cabelos lisos. Se a professora der conta de tratar aquele cabelo de uma forma tão afetiva quanto ela trata o cabelo lisinho, ela mudará o mundo daquela criança, inclusive incluindo nessa criança defesa para que ela responda quando seu cabelo for chamado de duro, de feio. E daí ela se olha no espelho e vê beleza, que é um direito que está sendo conquistado muito aos poucos. A chance é de que faça diferença pra família inteira. A criança negra que fala ‘não, mãe, meu cabelo não é feio’ desloca aquele ciclo naquela família, de todas as mulheres alisarem o cabelo. (…) Um olhar afetivo nessa história quebra o ciclo.”

O afeto e a construção de redes de apoio também são apontados por Harvard como formas de aliviar o peso do estresse tóxico e construir resiliência em crianças e famílias.

“É claro que a ciência não consegue lidar com esses desafios sozinha, mas o pensamento informado pela ciência combinado com o conhecimento em mudar sistemas entrincheirados e as experiências vividas pelas famílias que criam seus filhos sob diferentes condições podem ser poderosos catalisadores de estratégias eficientes,” defende o Centro para o Desenvolvimento Infantil.

Como a educação brasileira acentua desigualdade racial e apaga os heróis negros da história do Brasil

Crianças reproduzem racismo? O debate que transformou escola em SP

Líder Ianomâmi, Davi Kopenawa é novo membro da Academia Brasileira de Ciências (Folha de S.Paulo)

www1.folha.uol.com.br

Kopenawa, primeiro indígena eleito na academia, deve tomar posse no primeiro dia de janeiro.

7 de dezembro de 2020


Um dos principais líderes do povo ianomâmi, Davi Kopenawa foi eleito membro colaborador da ABC (Academia Brasileira de Ciências). Ele toma posse no dia 1º de janeiro. Trata-se do primeiro indígena a integrar a academia.

A ABC, fundada em 1916 e uma das mais tradicionais associações científicas do país, diz que para fazer parte de seu quadro, reconhece os mais importantes pesquisadores brasileiros, que “podem ser considerados os representates mais legítimos da comunidade científica nacional”. O foco da academia, com seus mais de 900 membros, é o desenvolvimento científico do Brasil.

O líder indígena foi uma das pessoas dos que chamou mais atenção para o risco da Covid-19 para as populações tradicionais. Além disso, Kopenawa tem sido uma voz constante na luta contra a violência contra indígenas e para evitar a presença prejudicial de garimpos na Terra Indígena (TI) Ianomami.

No fim de 2019, ele recebeu, junto com a Associação Hutukara Yanomami, o Prêmio Right Livelihood, apelidado de “Nobel alternativo”, destinado a homenagear aqueles que oferecem respostas práticas e exemplares para os desafios mais urgentes enfrentados atualmente. Na mesma premiação, também foi homenageada a jovem ativista ambiental sueca Greta Thunberg.

Kopenawa é autor, ao lado de Bruce Albert, de “A Queda do CéuPalavras de um Xamã Yanomami”, livro lançado pela Companhia das Letras.

Publicada originalmente em francês em 2010, na coleção Terre Humaine, a história traz as observações do xamã a respeito do contato predador com o homem branco, ameaça constante para seu povo desde os anos 1960. O livro foi escrito a partir de suas palavras contadas a um etnólogo com quem nutre uma longa amizade —foram mais de 40 anos de contato entre Bruce Albert, o etnólogo-escritor, e o povo de Davi Kopenawa.

Segundo descrição da Companhia das Letras, a vocação de xamã desde a primeira infância, fruto de um saber cosmológico adquirido graças ao uso de potentes alucinógenos, é o primeiro dos três pilares que estruturam este livro. O segundo é o relato do avanço dos brancos pela floresta e seu cortejo de epidemias, violência e destruição. Por fim, os autores trazem a odisseia do líder indígena para denunciar a destruição de seu povo.

Os ianomâmis lutam há décadas contra o garimpo. Os primeiros contatos sistemáticos de brancos com eles, em território brasileiro, aconteceram nos anos 1940.

O contato com os “napë” (brancos), porém, trouxe uma enorme quantidade de mortes por doenças como gripe, sarampo e rubéola, além dos massacres ao povo indígena.

“Napë”, para ianomâmis, de forma geral, significa garimpeiros, que produziram sérios conflitos dentro do território, e continuam em atividade na área. Um dos casos emblemátcos foi o massacre de Haximu (1993), que resultou na morte de 16 indígenas, principalmete de mulheres, crianças e velhos. O fato ocorreu após o assassinato de um garimpeiro.

Kopenawa dizia que não adianta brigar com “napë”, pelas suas armas de fogo, tratores e o fogo na mata.

Is it better to give than receive? (Science Daily)

Children who experienced compassionate parenting were more generous than peers

Date: December 1, 2020

Source: University of California – Davis

Summary: Young children who have experienced compassionate love and empathy from their mothers may be more willing to turn thoughts into action by being generous to others, a University of California, Davis, study suggests. Lab studies were done of children at ages 4 and 6.


Child holding present | Credit: © ulza / stock.adobe.com
Child holding present (stock image). Credit: © ulza / stock.adobe.com

Young children who have experienced compassionate love and empathy from their mothers may be more willing to turn thoughts into action by being generous to others, a University of California, Davis, study suggests.

In lab studies, children tested at ages 4 and 6 showed more willingness to give up the tokens they had earned to fictional children in need when two conditions were present — if they showed bodily changes when given the opportunity to share and had experienced positive parenting that modeled such kindness. The study initially included 74 preschool-age children and their mothers. They were invited back two years later, resulting in 54 mother-child pairs whose behaviors and reactions were analyzed when the children were 6.

“At both ages, children with better physiological regulation and with mothers who expressed stronger compassionate love were likely to donate more of their earnings,” said Paul Hastings, UC Davis professor of psychology and the mentor of the doctoral student who led the study. “Compassionate mothers likely develop emotionally close relationships with their children while also providing an early example of prosocial orientation toward the needs of others,” researchers said in the study.

The study was published in November in Frontiers in Psychology: Emotion Science. Co-authors were Jonas G. Miller, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University (who was a UC Davis doctoral student when the study was written); Sarah Kahle of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis; and Natalie R. Troxel, now at Facebook.

In each lab exercise, after attaching a monitor to record children’s heart-rate activity, the examiner told the children they would be earning tokens for a variety of activities, and that the tokens could be turned in for a prize. The tokens were put into a box, and each child eventually earned 20 prize tokens. Then before the session ended, children were told they could donate all or part of their tokens to other children (in the first instance, they were told these were for sick children who couldn’t come and play the game, and in the second instance, they were told the children were experiencing a hardship.)

At the same time, mothers answered questions about their compassionate love for their children and for others in general. The mothers selected phrases in a survey such as:

  • “I would rather engage in actions that help my child than engage in actions that would help me.”
  • “Those whom I encounter through my work and public life can assume that I will be there if they need me.”
  • “I would rather suffer myself than see someone else (a stranger) suffer.”

Taken together, the findings showed that children’s generosity is supported by the combination of their socialization experiences — their mothers’ compassionate love — and their physiological regulation, and that these work like “internal and external supports for the capacity to act prosocially that build on each other.”

The results were similar at ages 4 and 6.

In addition to observing the children’s propensity to donate their game earnings, the researchers observed that being more generous also seemed to benefit the children. At both ages 4 and 6, the physiological recording showed that children who donated more tokens were calmer after the activity, compared to the children who donated no or few tokens. They wrote that “prosocial behaviors may be intrinsically effective for soothing one’s own arousal.” Hastings suggested that “being in a calmer state after sharing could reinforce the generous behavior that produced that good feeling.”

This work was supported by the Fetzer Institute, Mindfulness Connections, and the National Institute of Mental Health.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of California – Davis. Original written by Karen Nikos-Rose. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jonas G. Miller, Sarah Kahle, Natalie R. Troxel, Paul D. Hastings. The Development of Generosity From 4 to 6 Years: Examining Stability and the Biopsychosocial Contributions of Children’s Vagal Flexibility and Mothers’ Compassion. Frontiers in Psychology, 2020; 11 DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.590384

Com Paes, Cacique Cobra Coral volta à cena para domar o tempo no Rio (Veja Rio)

vejario.abril.com.br

Cleo Guimarães, 30 nov 2020, 13h25

Cacique Cobra Coral: de volta aos bastidores do governo municipal Facebook/Reprodução

Ela vai voltar. Depois de quase duas duas décadas trabalhando espiritualmente para desviar nuvens de chuva que pairavam sobre o Rio e expunham a cidade a enchentes, deslizamentos e ao insucesso de grandes eventos, Adelaide Scritori prepara seu retorno à cidade.

A médium que diz incorporar o espírito do Cacique Cobra Coral – entidade que teria a capacidade de controlar o tempo – teve a parceria com a prefeitura suspensa por Marcelo Crivella e agora, com a eleição de Paes, voltará a usar seus poderes paranormais para monitorar o clima e as precipitações no Rio. “A primeira coisa que vamos fazer é redistribuir as chuvas para que não caiam em excesso e no lugar errado”, disse a VEJA RIO Osmar Santos, porta-voz da Fundação, que teve Paulo Coelho entre seus diretores. A presença da médium não será apenas espiritual: no início de janeiro, Adelaide e sua equipe reabrem a sede carioca do grupo e voltam a passar quatro dias da semana na cidade – mais especificamente, na Barra da Tijuca.

A Fundação vinha sendo chamada para evitar temporais na virada do ano em Copacabana desde 2000, mesmo ano em que passou a monitorar os carnavais da cidade – a única exceção foi 2015, quando o estado vivia uma crise hídrica. Exatamente naquele ano, um temporal atrapalhou os desfiles da Mocidade, da Mangueira e da Viradouro, que foi rebaixada. Adelaide costumava ser convocada por empresários do entretenimento, como Roberto Medina (Rock in Rio) e Abel Gomes (Réveillon, Árvore de Natal da Lagoa), para “desviar” chuvas e temporais que se aproximavam da cidade em dias de shows e eventos ao ar livre. João Doria, ex-prefeito e atual governador de São Paulo, também firmou parceria com a Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral.

Next pandemic? Amazon deforestation may spark new diseases (Reuters)

Original article

October 19, 20208:56 AM

By Fabio Zuker

SAO PAULO (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – As farms expand into the Amazon rainforest, felled trees and expanding pastures may open the way for new Brazilian exports beyond beef and soybeans, researchers say: pandemic diseases.

Changes in the Amazon are driving displaced species of animals, from bats to monkeys to mosquitoes, into new areas, while opening the region to arrivals of more savanna-adapted species, including rodents.

Those shifts, combined with greater human interaction with animals as people move deeper into the forest, is increasing the chances of a virulent virus, bacteria or fungus jumping species, said Adalberto Luís Val a researcher at INPA, the National Institute for Research in the Amazon, based in Manaus.

Climate change, which is driving temperature and rainfall changes, adds to the risks, the biologist said.

“There is a great concern because … there is a displacement of organisms. They try to adapt, face these new challenging scenarios by changing places,” Val told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a telephone interview.

The Evandro Chagas Institute, a public health research organization in the city of Belém, has identified about 220 different types of viruses in the Amazon, 37 of which can cause diseases in humans and 15 of which have the potential to cause epidemics, the researcher said.

They include a range of different encephalitis varieties as well as West Nile fever and rocio, a Brazilian virus from the same family that produces yellow fever and West Nile, he noted in an article published in May by the Brazilian Academy of Sciences.

Val said he was especially concerned about arboviruses, which can be transmitted by insects such as the mosquitoes that carry dengue fever and Zika.

‘SPILLOVER’

Cecília Andreazzi, a researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), a major public health institute in Brazil, said the current surge in deforestation and fires in the Amazon can lead to new meetings between species on the move – each a chance for an existing pathogen to transform or jump species.

The ecologist maps existing infectious agents among Brazil’s animals and constructs mathematical models about how the country’s changing landscape “is influencing the structure of these interactions”.

What she is looking for is likely “spillover” opportunities, when a pathogen in one species could start circulating in another, potentially creating a new disease – as appears to have happened in China with the virus that causes COVID-19, she said.

“Megadiverse countries with high social vulnerability and growing environmental degradation are prone to pathogen spillover from wildlife to humans, and they require policies aimed at avoiding the emergence of zoonoses,” she and other researchers wrote in a letter in The Lancet, a science journal, in September.

Brazil, they said, had already seen “clear warnings” of a growing problem, with the emergence of a Brazilian hemorrhagic fever, rodent-carried hantaviruses, and a mosquito-transmitted arbovirus called oropouche.

Brazil’s Amazon has registered some of the worst fires in a decade this year, as deforestation and invasions of indigenous land grow under right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro, who has urged that the Amazon be developed as a means of fighting poverty.

In a speech before the U.N. General Assembly last month, he angrily denied the existence of fires in the Amazon rainforest, calling them a “lie,” despite data produced by his own government showing thousands of blazes surging across the region.

‘BLAME THE BAT’

João Paulo Lima Barreto, a member of the Tukano indigenous people, said one way of combatting the emergence of new pandemic threats is reviving old knowledge about relationships among living things.

Barreto, who is doing doctoral research on shamanistic knowledge and healing at the Federal University of Amazonas, created Bahserikowi’i, an indigenous medicine center that brings the knowledge of the Upper Rio Negro shamans to Manaus, the Amazon’s largest city.

He has called for indigenous knowledge systems to be taken seriously.

“The model of our relationship with our surroundings is wrong,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a telephone interview.

“It is very easy for us to blame the bat, to blame the monkey, to blame the pig” when a new disease emerges, Barreto said. “But in fact, the human is causing this, in the relationship that we build with the owners of the space”.

Without adequate preservation of forests, rivers and animals, imbalance and disease are generated, he said, as humans fail to respect nature entities known to shamans as “wai-mahsã”.

Andreazzi said particularly strong disease risks come from converting Amazonian forest into more open, savanna-like pastures and fields, which attract marsupials and also rodents, carriers of hantaviruses.

“If you transform the Amazon into a field, you are creating this niche” and species may expand their ranges to fill it, she said, with “the abundance of these species greatly increasing”.

In the face of deforestation, animals are “relocating, moving. And the pathogen, the virus… is looking for hosts” – a situation that creates “very high adaptive capacity”, she said.

But Andreazzi worries about old diseases, as well as new ones.

As the Amazon changes, new outbreaks of threats such as malaria, leishmaniasis and Chagas disease – transmitted by a “kissing bug” and capable of causing heart damage – have been registered, she said.

“We don’t even need to talk about the new diseases. The old ones already carry great risks,” she added.

Reporting by Fabio Zuker ; editing by Laurie Goering : Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters. Visit news.trust.org/climate

Intelligent Life Really Can’t Exist Anywhere Else (Popular Mechanics)

Hell, our own evolution on Earth was pure luck.

www-popularmechanics-com.cdn.ampproject.org

Caroline Delbert, Nov 24, 2020

LipowskiGetty Images


  • Cosmic statisticians say the likelihood of life evolving on Earth is even less than we thought.
  • Analysis suggests individual steps in evolution were more likely to take longer than Earth’s existence.
  • The scientists say this research is designed give future researchers a foundation.

In newly published research from Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute, scientists study the likelihood of key times for evolution of life on Earth and conclude that it would be virtually impossible for that life to evolve the same way somewhere else.

Life has come a very long way in a very short time on Earth, relatively speaking—and scientists say that represents even more improbable luck for intelligent life that is rare to begin with.

For decades, scientists and even philosophers have chased many explanations for the Fermi paradox. How, in an infinitely big universe, can we be the only intelligent life we’ve ever encountered? Even on Earth itself, they wonder, how are we the only species that ever has evolved advanced intelligence?

There are countless naturally occurring, but extremely lucky ways in which Earth is special, sheltered, protected, and encouraged to have evolved life. And some key moments of emerging life seem much more likely than others, based on what really did happen.

“The fact that eukaryotic life took over a billion years to emerge from prokaryotic precursors suggests it is a far less probable event than the development of multicellular life, which is thought to have originated independently over 40 times,” the researchers explain. They continue:

“The early emergence of abiogenesis is one example that is frequently cited as evidence that simple life must be fairly common throughout the Universe. By using the timing of evolutionary transitions to estimate the rates of transition, we can derive information about the likelihood of a given transition even if it occurred only once in Earth’s history.”

In this paper, researchers from Oxford University’s illustrious Future of Humanity Institute continue to wonder how all this can be and what it means. The researchers include mathematical ecologists, who do a kind of forensic mathematics of Earth’s history.

In this case, they’ve used a Bayesian model of factors related to evolutionary transitions, which are the key points where life on Earth has turned from ooze to eukaryotes, for example, and from fission and other asexual reproduction to sexual reproduction, which greatly accelerates the rate of mutation and development of species by mixing DNA as a matter of course.


Most of these “evolutionary transitions” are poorly understood and have not been very well studied by the scientists of likelihoods. And using their model, these scientists say that Earth’s series of Goldilocks lottery tickets are more likely to have taken far longer than they really did on Earth.

There’s an iconic scene in the 2001 movie Ocean’s Eleven where George Clooney explains the series of escalating improbabilities of his planned crime. After several hugely unlikely outcomes, he says, “Then it’s a piece of cake: just three more guards with Uzis, and the most elaborate vault door conceived by man.” In a way, the unlikely hurdles to the rapid flourishing of complex life on Earth are the same way.

First, we win the lottery for surface temperature and protection from spaceborne dangers. Second, we win the lottery for the presence of building blocks of life. Third, we win the lottery for the right location for the right building blocks. That’s before anything like the most primitive single cell has even emerged.

Using some information we do know, like the age of Earth and the expected end of its habitable lifetime due to the expanding heat radius of our sun, these researchers have turned evolutionary transitions into a series of existential scratch-off tickets. Read the whole fascinating study here.

The Catholic Church Is Responding to Indigenous Protest With Exorcisms (Truthout)

truthout.org

Charles Sepulveda, November 26, 2020

LaRazaUnida cover the Fray Junípero Serra Statue in protest at the Brand Park Memory Garden across from the San Fernando Mission in San Fernando on June 28, 2020.
Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News / SCNG


On this day, Indigenous activists in New England and beyond are observing a National Day of Mourning to mark the theft of land, cultural assault and genocide that followed after the anchoring of the Mayflower on Wampanoag land in 1620 — a genocide that is erased within conventional “Thanksgiving Day” narratives.

The acts of mourning and resistance taking place today build on the energy of Indigenous People’s Day 2020, which was also a day of uprising. On October 11, 2020, also called “Indigenous People’s Day of Rage,” participants around the country took part in actions such as de-monumenting — the toppling of statues of individuals dedicated to racial nation-building.

In response to Indigenous-led efforts that demanded land back and the toppling of statues, Catholic Church leaders in Oregon and California deemed it necessary to perform exorcisms, thereby casting Indigenous protest as demonic.

The toppled statues included President Abraham Lincoln, President Theodore Roosevelt and Father Junípero Serra, who founded California’s mission system (1769-1834) and was canonized into sainthood by the Catholic Church and Pope Francis in 2015.

What do these leaders whose statues were toppled have in common? They perpetrated and promoted devastating violence against Native peoples.

Abraham Lincoln was responsible for the largest mass execution in United States history when 38 Dakota were hanged in 1862 after being found guilty for their involvement in what is known as the “Minnesota Uprising.”

Theodore Roosevelt gave a speech in 1886 in New York that would have made today’s white supremacists blush when he declared: “I don’t go as far as to think that the only good Indian is the dead Indian, but I believe nine out of every ten are…” This was not his only foray in promoting racial genocide.

Junípero Serra is known for having committed cruel punishments against the Indians of California and enslaved them as part of Spain’s genocidal conquest.

Last month, “Land Back” and “Dakota 38” were scrawled on the base of the now-toppled Lincoln statue in Portland, Oregon. The political statements and demands for land return reveal a Native decolonial spirit based in resistance continuing through multiple generations

The “Indigenous People’s Day of Rage” came after months of protests in Portland in support of Black Lives Matter. The resistance enacted in Portland coincides with demands for both abolition (the end of racialized policing and imprisonment) and decolonization (the return of land and regeneration of life outside of colonialism). Both of these notions encompass a multifaceted imagining of life beyond white supremacy.

In San Rafael, California, Native activists gathered at the Spanish mission that had been the site of California Indian enslavement. Activists, who included members of the Coast Miwok of Marin, first poured red paint on the statue of Serra and then pulled it down with ropes, while other protesters held signs that read: “Land Back Now” and “We Stand on Unceded Land – Decolonization means #LandBack.” The statue broke at the ankles, leaving only the feet on the base.

What was even more provocative than the toppling of the statues by Native activists and their accomplices, was the response by the Catholic Church, which not only condemned the actions of the Native activists, but also spiritually chastised them. In both Portland and San Rafael, the reaction by the Church was to perform exorcisms.

The purpose of an exorcism, according to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, is to expel demons or “the liberation from demonic possession through the spiritual authority which Jesus entrusted to his Church.”

In other words, Native activism and demands for land back were deemed blasphemous and evil by two archbishops and were determined to require exorcism.

In Portland, Archbishop Alexander K. Sample led 225 members of his congregation to a city park where he prayed a rosary for peace and conducted an exorcism on October 17, six days after the “Indigenous People’s Day of Rage.” Archbishop Sample stated that there was no better time to come together to pray for peace than in the wake of social unrest and on the eve of the elections. His exorcism was a direct response to Indigenous-led efforts that demanded land back.

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone held an exorcism on the same day as the one performed in Portland and after the toppling of Saint Junipero Serra’s statue in San Rafael. In his performance of the exorcism, he prayed that God would purify the mission of evil spirits as well as the hearts of those who perpetrated blasphemy. Was he responding to a “demonic possession” or was he exorcising the political motivations of those he did not agree with? Perhaps both, as he also stated that the toppling of the statue was an attack on the Catholic faith that took place on their own property. However, the mission is only Church property because of Native dispossession through conquest and missionization.

The conquest of the Americas by European nations was, as Saint Serra had deemed his own work, a “spiritual conquest.” From the doctrine of discovery to manifest destiny, the possession of Native land was rationalized as divine – from God. Those who threaten colonial possession are attacking the theological rationalization of possession, not their faith.

Demands for land back interfere with the doctrine that enabled Native land to be exorcised from them. Archbishop Cordileone’s exorcism was in the maintenance of property that had been stolen from Indigenous people long ago, and Archbishop Sample’s was in the maintenance of peace and the status quo of Native dispossession.

With a majority-Christian population in the United States and other nations in the Americas, demands for the return of land and decolonization have more to reckon with than racial injustice and white supremacy. Christians must also consider how dominant strains of Christian theology rationalized conquest and its ongoing structures of dispossession. Can a religion, made up of many sects, shift its framework to help end continued Native dispossession and its rationalization? Can we come together to overturn a racialized theological doctrine that functioned through violence and was adopted into a nation’s legal system? Can we imagine life beyond rage and the racialized spiritual possession of stolen land?

The Doctrine of Discovery was the primary international law developed in the 15th and 16th centuries through a series of papal bulls (Catholic decrees) that divided the Americas for white European conquest and authorized the enslavement of non-Christians. In 1823 the Doctrine of Discovery was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court case Johnson v. M’Intosh. Chief Justice John Marshall declared in his ruling that Indians only held occupancy rights to land — ownership belonged to the European nation that discovered it. This case further legalized the theft of Native lands. It continues to be a foundational principal of U.S. property law and has been cited as recently as 2005 by the U.S. Supreme Court (City of Sherrill v. Oneida Nation of Indians) to diminish Native American land rights.

In 2009 the Episcopal Church passed a resolution that repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery. It was the first Christian denomination to do so and has since been followed by several other denominations, including the Anglican Church of Canada (2010), the Religious Society of Friends/Quakers (2009 and 2012), the World Council of Churches (2012), the United Methodist Church (2012), the United Church of Christ (2013) and the Mennonite Church (2014).

Decolonization and land return are as possible as repudiating the legal justification of land theft. Social, cultural, governmental and economic systems are constantly changing, but the land remains — in the hands of the dispossessors. When our faith is held above what we know is true — we will prolong doing what is right.

Native peoples are not ancient peoples of the past only remembered on days such as Thanksgiving, just as our mourning is not all that we are. Native peoples are a myriad of things, including activists who demand land back — which is not a demonic request. Our land can be returned, and we can work together to heal and imagine a future beyond white supremacy and dispossession.

Achille Mbembe : “Ignorance too, is a form of power” (Chilperic )

Original article

Achille Mbembe

He talks and talks, you are on the verge of falling asleep, until suddenly, out of the blue, a word or a concept slaps you in the face. You listen again. He adds another violent metaphor to his argument and there you are, disarmed by a truth he just unveiled. I presume part of Cameroonian historian and philosopher Achille Mbembe’s brilliance stems from his ability to coin ideas that were as yet framed. Not that they didn’t exist before, but they were lacking the proper notes to be heard. For instance, his book De la Postcolonie, published in 2000, contributed to a massive rise of interest in post-colonial studies by revealing how colonial forms of domination continue to operate on and within the African continent. His Critique de la raison nègre, published in 2013, shed light on the function of the “Black” figure in the construction of Western identity. He later developed the concept of necropolitics, widely used today in academia, to illustrate the production of superfluous and unwanted populations. More recently, he introduced the notion of brutalism, which describes capitalism’s constant process of extraction and waste production. A process that generates growth: walls, clean streets, prescribed drugs, cars, banks – and trash. A trash made of human and non-human residues that we bury, send abroad, or incarcerate. Combustion, islands of plastic, or “migrants” who have no value in our economic system are examples of this exponential “trashisation” of the world. This side effect of brutalism is also defined by Mbembe as the tendential universalization of the Black condition: “The way we used to treat exclusively black people, is now extended to people with a different skin color,” he told me recently. ” The black person is by definition the one who can be humiliated, whose dignity is not recognized, whose rights can be violated with impunity, including his right to breath. He or she therefore represents the accomplished figure of the superfluous person. And nowadays, the number of superfluous people is constantly growing.” 
What annoys me with Achille Mbembe is the way he managed to pollute the innocence of my Western privileges. I was so much better off before,  flying for no reason around the world, while popping stimulants and tranquilizers to cope with my jet-lag. I’d see bankers as virtuous men I’d be desperate to marry and was secretly irritated by all these foreigners trying to flood our trash-free countries and schools. I’d worry for the future of my children and how all this precarity and danger might contaminate the clean side-walks of their own adulthood. I knew without “knowing” that racism and destruction of the environment are the two sides of the same coin, that we cannot fight one without fighting the other; that if we hadn’t and weren’t continuously destroying the African soil, it’s inhabitants for sure wouldn’t try to flee, that my privileges are not merely a question of luck, but the result of a continuous exploitation in which I am, whether I like it or not, complicit. All this I knew without being too disturbed by it. I hat found a comfortable way to exclude my responsibility from these tragedies that occur most of the time in remote parts of the world, far away from my home view in Switzerland. I guess no one enjoys to be reminded that under their innocence lies a pile of shit which has been produced not by “the other” but by one’s own self. Long story short: I sometimes wish I hadn’t come across Achille Mbembe’s slaps of truth. For, as he remarks in his last book, Brutalism, “Ignorance too, is a form of power.”                       

We met end of the summer 2020. I was in Bretagne, France;  he waiting for winter to end in his house in Johannesburg.

***

You refuse to be defined as a post-colonial thinker, how come? 

I have nothing against postcolonial or decolonial theory, but I am neither a postcolonial, nor a decolonial theorist. My story has been one of constant motion. I was born in Cameroun, I spent my twenties in Paris, my early and mid-thirties in New York, Philadelphia and Washington. I later moved to Dakar, Senegal and I’m now in Johannesburg, South Africa. Likewise, I was trained as an historian, then I studied political science. At the same time, I read a lot of philosophy and anthropology, immersed myself in literature, in psychoanalysis. As we speak, I am familiarizing myself with life sciences, climate and earth sciences, astrobiology. This perpetual crossing of borders is what characterizes my life and my work. 

So how should one define you? 

I’d rather define myself as a penseur de la traversée. One for whom critique is a form of care, healing and reparation. The idea of a common world, how to bring it into being, how to compose it, how to repair it and how to share it – this has ultimately been my main concern. 

© Stephanie Fuessenich/laif für die FAZ

In your last book, Brutalism (Editions La Decouverte, 2020) you plead for a politics of the en-commun (in-common) as a means to re-enchant the world and re-infuse solidarity among the elements which constitute and belong to this one world we all share together. Does your concept of the en-commun have any affinities with communist ideas? 

No, it has nothing to do with communism as a political ideology. It is related to my preoccupation with life futures, and as I have just said, with theories of care, healing and reparation, the reality of historical harms and debates on planetary habitability. Ultimately Eurocentrism has fostered colonialism, racism and white supremacy. Postcolonialism has been preoccupied with difference, identity and otherness. As a result of my deep interest in ancient African systems of thought, I am intrigued by the motifs of commonality and multiplicity, by the entanglement of all human and non-human forms of life and the community of substance they form. This commonality, I should add, must be constantly composed and recomposed. It must be pieced together, through endless struggles, and very often, defeats and new beginnings. 

Isn’t difference the basis of identity? 

During the 19th and 20th centuries, we have not stopped talking about difference and identity. About self and the Other. About who is like us and who is not. About who belongs and who doesn’t. As the seas keep rising, as the Earth keeps burning and radiation levels keep increasing and we are less and less shielded against the plasma flow from the sun and surrounded by viruses, this is a discourse we can now ill afford. 

Does this imply hierarchies should be more horizontal? 

By definition, all hierarchies should be exposed to contestation. I am in favor of radical equality. Formal equality is meaningless as long as certain bodies, almost always the same, remain trapped in the jaws of premature death. Once equality is secured, we need to work on the best mechanisms of representation. But those who represent us can never be taken to be hierarchically superior to us. Instead they are called upon to perform a service for the care of all. Representation can only be the result of consent and for such consent to be granted, those who represent us must be accountable. Nobody should make decisions on behalf of those who haven’t mandated him or her. The great difficulty these days and for the years to come is that decisions are increasingly made by technological devices. They are determined by algorithmic artefacts which have not been mandated, except possibly by their manufactures. 

Do you have a mission? 

I wouldn’t want to make things uglier than they already are. I’m here on earth like everyone else for a limited timeframe. A tiny particle in a universe governed by ungraspable forces. My goal is therefore to remain as open as possible to what is still to come. To welcome and embrace the manifold resonances of the forces of the universe. On my last day, at the dusk of my life, I want to be able to say that I have smelled the infinite flesh of the world and that I have fully breathed its breath. 

Writing is your medium. How did this practice come to you? 

I used to be shy. It was easier for me to write than to speak in public or even in a group. When I was 12, I was part of a poetry club at my boarding school. In parallel I kept a personal diary in which I would relate my daily experiences. But it was only when I turned 18 or 19 that I started writing, that is, speaking in public. 

What does writing mean to you? 

It enables me to find my own center. One could almost say “I write therefore I am.” It’s a space of inner peace, though it can also at times be one of self-division. Whatever the case, what I write is mine and can never be taken away from me. 

Do you have any writing routines? 

In order to write, I need silence. I need to be left alone for long hours, if not days. Silence for me is a prelude to a state of psychic condensation. When I was younger, I’d mostly write in the pitch dark, after midnight. Writing after midnight, I could reconnect with Africa’s deepest pulsations, its tragedies as well as its metamorphic potential, the promise it represents for the world. That is how I wrote On the Postcolony, in the midst of Congolese sounds and rhythms.

How do you reach this bubble of isolation and silence while living with your spouse, children and dog? 

My wife is a writer of her own account. The dog is a very unobtrusive companion. It also happens that I can be talking to you now without really being present. Being physically present doesn’t prevent my mind from being totally elsewhere. 

Where does your writing start? 

Most of the time in my head. Sometimes from what I see, what I hear, what I read. It can start in the shower, when I am cooking or while I lie on the bed waiting to fall asleep. I can spend long months without writing anything. Things first need to boil. I need to find myself in a position where I can no longer bracket the interpellation addressed to me by reality, an event or an encounter. 

Do you take notes? 

Not really, or not all the time. I may have notebooks, but I keep misplacing them and hardly ever return to them in any structured way. My writing generally begins with a word, a concept, a sound, a landscape or an event which suddenly resonates in me. I do have a very lively mental scape. As a result, writing is like translating an image into words. In fact my books are full of images of the mind, non-visual images. But I never know in advance where these images will lead me to or whether at the end of the process I will be able to adequately translate them into words without losing their allure. It’s a rather intuitive process. That’s also why I write my introductions at the end, as I’ll only be able to tell you what the book is about once it’s written, when all the images have been curated. 

Do you spend lots of time rewriting your sentences? 

I’m extremely attentive to each word, each phrase, the way it’s formulated, its rhythm and musicality, the punctuation. For a text to be powerful, that is to heal, it must viscerally speak to both the reader’s reason and senses. It must therefore be methodically composed, arranged, and curated. Once it’s done with the appropriate amount of care, I no longer go back to it. I actually never reread my books. 

Why ? 
Because I’m always afraid to realize that the translation of images into words could have been done differently, and that now it’s too late. It’s already published and now belongs somewhat to the public. I have a rather strange understanding of writing. Writing is like a trial with too many judges If one doesn’t wish to be condemned, one shouldn’t write. Because once you’ve written and published something, that’s it.. The door is locked and the key is taken away. Writing is like pronouncing a sentence on oneself.

Student in Paris in the 1980

You spend a significant amount of your time playing and watching soccer. What is it that you enjoy so much in this sport? 

It’s all about contingency and creation, creating in the midst of contingency. It’s about a certain relationship between a body in motion and a mind in a state of alert. That’s what fascinates me the most about football, the way in which 22 people attempt to inhabit a space they keep configuring and reconfiguring, erecting and erasing, and the explosions of primal joy when one’s team scores, or the primal screams when one’s team loses. And indeed, if I could go back in time, I would unquestionably pursue a professional soccer career. I’d retire in my early thirties and then do something else. 

If you were a philanthropic billionaire, in which cause would you invest? 

I’ve always considered money as a means to hinder one’s freedom. 

Why? 

I don’t want to be the slave of anything or of anybody. Not even the slave of my own passions. 

Doesn’t money enable a certain freedom too? 

If I had billions, I’d go back to Cameroun and revive my father’s farm. That’s where I spent part of my youth. I’d go back and turn this farm into a cooperative, into a laboratory for new ways of producing and living. The farm would become a living alternative of how to use local resources to live a clean life, starting with air, water, plants, food and so on. The farm would also be a vibrant place for artistic innovation. It would offer writing residencies for authors eager to commune with the vast expanses of our universe. 

If you could reincarnate, choose an era, country, profession, legend, what or whom would you choose? 

I’d come back as Ibn Khaldun, an Arab intellectual who is often presented as one of the very first sociologists. He visited the empire of Mali in the 14th century. I would be curious to discover this era. To be a sort of intellectual who travels the world, discovering Africa before the Triangular trade and sounding out what we could have become. 

The Petabyte Age: Because More Isn’t Just More — More Is Different (Wired)

WIRED Staff, Science, 06.23.2008 12:00 PM

Introduction: Sensors everywhere. Infinite storage. Clouds of processors. Our ability to capture, warehouse, and understand massive amounts of data is changing science, medicine, business, and technology. As our collection of facts and figures grows, so will the opportunity to find answers to fundamental questions. Because in the era of big data, more isn’t just more. […]

petabyte age
Marian Bantjes

Introduction:

Sensors everywhere. Infinite storage. Clouds of processors. Our ability to capture, warehouse, and understand massive amounts of data is changing science, medicine, business, and technology. As our collection of facts and figures grows, so will the opportunity to find answers to fundamental questions. Because in the era of big data, more isn’t just more. More is different.

The End of Theory:

The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete

Feeding the Masses:
Data In, Crop Predictions Out

Chasing the Quark:
Sometimes You Need to Throw Information Away

Winning the Lawsuit:
Data Miners Dig for Dirt

Tracking the News:
A Smarter Way to Predict Riots and Wars

__Spotting the Hot Zones: __
Now We Can Monitor Epidemics Hour by Hour

__ Sorting the World:__
Google Invents New Way to Manage Data

__ Watching the Skies:__
Space Is Big — But Not Too Big to Map

Scanning Our Skeletons:
Bone Images Show Wear and Tear

Tracking Air Fares:
Elaborate Algorithms Predict Ticket Prices

Predicting the Vote:
Pollsters Identify Tiny Voting Blocs

Pricing Terrorism:
Insurers Gauge Risks, Costs

Visualizing Big Data:
Bar Charts for Words

Big data and the end of theory? (The Guardian)

theguardian.com

Mark Graham, Fri 9 Mar 2012 14.39 GM

Does big data have the answers? Maybe some, but not all, says Mark Graham

In 2008, Chris Anderson, then editor of Wired, wrote a provocative piece titled The End of Theory. Anderson was referring to the ways that computers, algorithms, and big data can potentially generate more insightful, useful, accurate, or true results than specialists or
domain experts who traditionally craft carefully targeted hypotheses
and research strategies.

This revolutionary notion has now entered not just the popular imagination, but also the research practices of corporations, states, journalists and academics. The idea being that the data shadows and information trails of people, machines, commodities and even nature can reveal secrets to us that we now have the power and prowess to uncover.

In other words, we no longer need to speculate and hypothesise; we simply need to let machines lead us to the patterns, trends, and relationships in social, economic, political, and environmental relationships.

It is quite likely that you yourself have been the unwitting subject of a big data experiment carried out by Google, Facebook and many other large Web platforms. Google, for instance, has been able to collect extraordinary insights into what specific colours, layouts, rankings, and designs make people more efficient searchers. They do this by slightly tweaking their results and website for a few million searches at a time and then examining the often subtle ways in which people react.

Most large retailers similarly analyse enormous quantities of data from their databases of sales (which are linked to you by credit card numbers and loyalty cards) in order to make uncanny predictions about your future behaviours. In a now famous case, the American retailer, Target, upset a Minneapolis man by knowing more about his teenage daughter’s sex life than he did. Target was able to predict his daughter’s pregnancy by monitoring her shopping patterns and comparing that information to an enormous database detailing billions of dollars of sales. This ultimately allows the company to make uncanny
predictions about its shoppers.

More significantly, national intelligence agencies are mining vast quantities of non-public Internet data to look for weak signals that might indicate planned threats or attacks.

There can by no denying the significant power and potentials of big data. And the huge resources being invested in both the public and private sectors to study it are a testament to this.

However, crucially important caveats are needed when using such datasets: caveats that, worryingly, seem to be frequently overlooked.

The raw informational material for big data projects is often derived from large user-generated or social media platforms (e.g. Twitter or Wikipedia). Yet, in all such cases we are necessarily only relying on information generated by an incredibly biased or skewed user-base.

Gender, geography, race, income, and a range of other social and economic factors all play a role in how information is produced and reproduced. People from different places and different backgrounds tend to produce different sorts of information. And so we risk ignoring a lot of important nuance if relying on big data as a social/economic/political mirror.

We can of course account for such bias by segmenting our data. Take the case of using Twitter to gain insights into last summer’s London riots. About a third of all UK Internet users have a twitter profile; a subset of that group are the active tweeters who produce the bulk of content; and then a tiny subset of that group (about 1%) geocode their tweets (essential information if you want to know about where your information is coming from).

Despite the fact that we have a database of tens of millions of data points, we are necessarily working with subsets of subsets of subsets. Big data no longer seems so big. Such data thus serves to amplify the information produced by a small minority (a point repeatedly made by UCL’s Muki Haklay), and skew, or even render invisible, ideas, trends, people, and patterns that aren’t mirrored or represented in the datasets that we work with.

Big data is undoubtedly useful for addressing and overcoming many important issues face by society. But we need to ensure that we aren’t seduced by the promises of big data to render theory unnecessary.

We may one day get to the point where sufficient quantities of big data can be harvested to answer all of the social questions that most concern us. I doubt it though. There will always be digital divides; always be uneven data shadows; and always be biases in how information and technology are used and produced.

And so we shouldn’t forget the important role of specialists to contextualise and offer insights into what our data do, and maybe more importantly, don’t tell us.

Mark Graham is a research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute and is one of the creators of the Floating Sheep blog

The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete (Wired)

wired.com

Chris Anderson, Science, 06.23.2008 12:00 PM


Illustration: Marian Bantjes “All models are wrong, but some are useful.”

So proclaimed statistician George Box 30 years ago, and he was right. But what choice did we have? Only models, from cosmological equations to theories of human behavior, seemed to be able to consistently, if imperfectly, explain the world around us. Until now. Today companies like Google, which have grown up in an era of massively abundant data, don’t have to settle for wrong models. Indeed, they don’t have to settle for models at all.

Sixty years ago, digital computers made information readable. Twenty years ago, the Internet made it reachable. Ten years ago, the first search engine crawlers made it a single database. Now Google and like-minded companies are sifting through the most measured age in history, treating this massive corpus as a laboratory of the human condition. They are the children of the Petabyte Age.

The Petabyte Age is different because more is different. Kilobytes were stored on floppy disks. Megabytes were stored on hard disks. Terabytes were stored in disk arrays. Petabytes are stored in the cloud. As we moved along that progression, we went from the folder analogy to the file cabinet analogy to the library analogy to — well, at petabytes we ran out of organizational analogies.

At the petabyte scale, information is not a matter of simple three- and four-dimensional taxonomy and order but of dimensionally agnostic statistics. It calls for an entirely different approach, one that requires us to lose the tether of data as something that can be visualized in its totality. It forces us to view data mathematically first and establish a context for it later. For instance, Google conquered the advertising world with nothing more than applied mathematics. It didn’t pretend to know anything about the culture and conventions of advertising — it just assumed that better data, with better analytical tools, would win the day. And Google was right.

Google’s founding philosophy is that we don’t know why this page is better than that one: If the statistics of incoming links say it is, that’s good enough. No semantic or causal analysis is required. That’s why Google can translate languages without actually “knowing” them (given equal corpus data, Google can translate Klingon into Farsi as easily as it can translate French into German). And why it can match ads to content without any knowledge or assumptions about the ads or the content.

Speaking at the O’Reilly Emerging Technology Conference this past March, Peter Norvig, Google’s research director, offered an update to George Box’s maxim: “All models are wrong, and increasingly you can succeed without them.”

This is a world where massive amounts of data and applied mathematics replace every other tool that might be brought to bear. Out with every theory of human behavior, from linguistics to sociology. Forget taxonomy, ontology, and psychology. Who knows why people do what they do? The point is they do it, and we can track and measure it with unprecedented fidelity. With enough data, the numbers speak for themselves.

The big target here isn’t advertising, though. It’s science. The scientific method is built around testable hypotheses. These models, for the most part, are systems visualized in the minds of scientists. The models are then tested, and experiments confirm or falsify theoretical models of how the world works. This is the way science has worked for hundreds of years.

Scientists are trained to recognize that correlation is not causation, that no conclusions should be drawn simply on the basis of correlation between X and Y (it could just be a coincidence). Instead, you must understand the underlying mechanisms that connect the two. Once you have a model, you can connect the data sets with confidence. Data without a model is just noise.

But faced with massive data, this approach to science — hypothesize, model, test — is becoming obsolete. Consider physics: Newtonian models were crude approximations of the truth (wrong at the atomic level, but still useful). A hundred years ago, statistically based quantum mechanics offered a better picture — but quantum mechanics is yet another model, and as such it, too, is flawed, no doubt a caricature of a more complex underlying reality. The reason physics has drifted into theoretical speculation about n-dimensional grand unified models over the past few decades (the “beautiful story” phase of a discipline starved of data) is that we don’t know how to run the experiments that would falsify the hypotheses — the energies are too high, the accelerators too expensive, and so on.

Now biology is heading in the same direction. The models we were taught in school about “dominant” and “recessive” genes steering a strictly Mendelian process have turned out to be an even greater simplification of reality than Newton’s laws. The discovery of gene-protein interactions and other aspects of epigenetics has challenged the view of DNA as destiny and even introduced evidence that environment can influence inheritable traits, something once considered a genetic impossibility.

In short, the more we learn about biology, the further we find ourselves from a model that can explain it.

There is now a better way. Petabytes allow us to say: “Correlation is enough.” We can stop looking for models. We can analyze the data without hypotheses about what it might show. We can throw the numbers into the biggest computing clusters the world has ever seen and let statistical algorithms find patterns where science cannot.

The best practical example of this is the shotgun gene sequencing by J. Craig Venter. Enabled by high-speed sequencers and supercomputers that statistically analyze the data they produce, Venter went from sequencing individual organisms to sequencing entire ecosystems. In 2003, he started sequencing much of the ocean, retracing the voyage of Captain Cook. And in 2005 he started sequencing the air. In the process, he discovered thousands of previously unknown species of bacteria and other life-forms.

If the words “discover a new species” call to mind Darwin and drawings of finches, you may be stuck in the old way of doing science. Venter can tell you almost nothing about the species he found. He doesn’t know what they look like, how they live, or much of anything else about their morphology. He doesn’t even have their entire genome. All he has is a statistical blip — a unique sequence that, being unlike any other sequence in the database, must represent a new species.

This sequence may correlate with other sequences that resemble those of species we do know more about. In that case, Venter can make some guesses about the animals — that they convert sunlight into energy in a particular way, or that they descended from a common ancestor. But besides that, he has no better model of this species than Google has of your MySpace page. It’s just data. By analyzing it with Google-quality computing resources, though, Venter has advanced biology more than anyone else of his generation.

This kind of thinking is poised to go mainstream. In February, the National Science Foundation announced the Cluster Exploratory, a program that funds research designed to run on a large-scale distributed computing platform developed by Google and IBM in conjunction with six pilot universities. The cluster will consist of 1,600 processors, several terabytes of memory, and hundreds of terabytes of storage, along with the software, including IBM’s Tivoli and open source versions of Google File System and MapReduce.111 Early CluE projects will include simulations of the brain and the nervous system and other biological research that lies somewhere between wetware and software.

Learning to use a “computer” of this scale may be challenging. But the opportunity is great: The new availability of huge amounts of data, along with the statistical tools to crunch these numbers, offers a whole new way of understanding the world. Correlation supersedes causation, and science can advance even without coherent models, unified theories, or really any mechanistic explanation at all.

There’s no reason to cling to our old ways. It’s time to ask: What can science learn from Google?

Chris Anderson (canderson@wired.com) is the editor in chief of Wired.

Related The Petabyte Age: Sensors everywhere. Infinite storage. Clouds of processors. Our ability to capture, warehouse, and understand massive amounts of data is changing science, medicine, business, and technology. As our collection of facts and figures grows, so will the opportunity to find answers to fundamental questions. Because in the era of big data, more isn’t just more. More is different.

Correction:
1 This story originally stated that the cluster software would include the actual Google File System.
06.27.08

Some Brazilians long considered themselves White. Now many identify as Black as fight for equity inspires racial redefinition. (Washington Post)

washingtonpost.com

Terrence McCoy and Heloísa Traiano, November 15, 2020 at 5:23 p.m. GMT-3


RIO DE JANEIRO — For most of his 57 years, to the extent that he thought about his race, José Antônio Gomes used the language he was raised with. He was “pardo” — biracial — which was how his parents identified themselves. Or maybe “moreno,” as people back in his hometown called him. Perhaps “mestiço,” a blend of ethnicities.

It wasn’t until this year, when protests for racial justice erupted across the United States after George Floyd’s killing in police custody, that Gomes’s own uncertainty settled. Watching television, he saw himself in the thousands of people of color protesting amid the racially diverse crowds. He saw himself in Floyd.

Gomes realized he wasn’t mixed. He was Black.

So in September, when he announced his candidacy for city council in the southeastern city of Turmalina, Gomes officially identified himself that way. “In reality, I’ve always been Black,” he said. “But I didn’t think I was Black. But now we have more courage to see ourselves that way.”

Brazil is home to more people of African heritage than any country outside Africa. But it is rarely identified as a Black nation, or as closely identifying with any race, really. It has seen itself as simply Brazilian — a tapestry of European, African and Indigenous backgrounds that has defied the more rigid racial categories used elsewhere. Some were darker, others lighter. But almost everyone was a mix.

Now, however, as affirmative action policies diversify Brazilian institutions and the struggle for racial equality in the United States inspires a similar movement here, a growing number of people are redefining themselves. Brazilians who long considered themselves to be White are reexamining their family histories and concluding that they’re pardo. Others who thought of themselves as pardo now say they’re Black.

In Brazil, which still carries the imprint of colonization and slavery, where class and privilege are strongly associated with race, the racial reconfiguration has been striking. Over the past decade, the percentage of Brazilians who consider themselves White has dropped from 48 percent to 43 percent, according to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, while the number of people who identify as Black or mixed has risen from 51 percent to 56 percent.

“We are clearly seeing more Black people publicly declare themselves as Black, as they would in other countries,” said Kleber Antonio de Oliveira Amancio, a social historian at the Federal University of Recôncavo da Bahia. “Racial change is much more fluid here than it is in the United States.”

One of the clearest illustrations of that fluidity — and the growing movement to identify as Black — was the registration process for the 5,500 or so municipal elections held here Sunday. Candidates were required to identify as White, Black, mixed, Indigenous or Asian. And that routine bureaucratic step yielded fairly stunning results.

More than a quarter of the 168,000 candidates who also ran in 2016 have changed their race, according to a Washington Post analysis of election registration data. Nearly 17,000 who said they were White in 2016 are now mixed. Around 6,000 who said they were mixed are now Black. And more than 14,000 who said they were mixed now identify as White.

For some candidates, the jump was even further. Nearly 900 went from White to Black, and nearly 600 went from Black to White.

How to explain it?

Some say they’re simply correcting bureaucratic error: A party official charged with registering candidates saw their picture and recorded their race inaccurately. One woman joked that she’d gotten a lot less sun this year while quarantined and decided to declare herself White. Another candidate told the Brazilian newspaper O Globo that he was Black but was a “fan” of the Indigenous, and so has now joined them. Some believed candidates were taking advantage of a recent court decision that requires parties to dispense campaign funds evenly among racial categories.

And others said they didn’t see what all of the fuss was about.

“Race couldn’t exist,” reasoned Carlos Lacerda, a city council candidate in the southeastern city of Araçatuba, who described himself as White in 2016 and Black this year. “It’s nationalism, and that’s it. Race is something I’d never speak about.”

“We have way more important things to talk about than my race,” said Ribamar Antônio da Silva, a city council member seeking reelection in the southeastern city of Osasco.

But others looked at the racial registration as a chance to fulfill a long-denied identity.

Cristovam Andrade, 36, a city council candidate in the northeastern city of São Felipe, was raised on a farm in rural Bahia, where the influence of West Africa never felt far away. With limited access to information outside his community — let alone Brazil — he grew up believing he was White. That was how his parents had always described him.

“I didn’t have any idea about race in North America or in Europe,” he said. “But I knew a lot of people who were darker than me, so I saw myself as White.”

As he began to see himself as Black, Brazil did, too. For much of its history, Brazil’s intellectual elite described Latin America’s largest country as a “racial democracy,” saying its history of intermixing had spared it the racism that plagues other countries. Around 5 million enslaved Africans were shipped to Brazil — more than 10 times the number that ended up in North America — and the country was the last in the Western Hemisphere to abolish slavery, in 1888. Its history since has been one of profound racial inequality: White people earn nearly twice as much as Black people on average, and more than 75 percent of the 5,800 people killed by police last year were Black.

But Brazil never adopted prohibitions on intermarrying or draconian racial distinctions. Race became malleable.

The Brazilian soccer player Neymar famously said he wasn’t Black. Former president Fernando Henrique Cardoso famously said he was, at least in part. The 20th-century Brazilian sociologist Gilberto de Mello Freyre wrote in the 1930s that all Brazilians — “even the light-skinned fair-haired one” — carried Indigenous or African lineage.

“The self-declaration as Black is a very complex question in Brazilian society,” said Wlamyra Albuquerque, a historian at the Federal University of Bahia. “And one of the reasons for this is that the myth of a racial democracy is still in political culture in Brazil. The notion that we’re all mixed, and because of this, racism couldn’t exist in the country, is still dominant.”

Given the choice, many Afro-Brazilians, historians and sociologists argue, have historically chosen not to identify as Black — whether consciously or not — to distance themselves from the enduring legacy of slavery and societal inequality. Wealth and privilege allowed some to separate even further from their skin color.

“In Brazilian schools, we didn’t learn who was an African person, who was an Indigenous person,” said Bartolina Ramalho Catanante, a historian at the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul. “We only learned who was a European person and how they came here. To be Black wasn’t valued.”

But over the past two decades, as diversity efforts elevated previously marginalized voices into newscasts, telenovelas and politics, people such as Andrade have begun to think of themselves differently. To Andrade’s mother, he was White. But he wasn’t so sure. His late father had been Black. His grandparents had been Black. Just because his skin color was lighter, did that make his African roots, and his family’s experience of slavery, any less a part of his history?

In 2016, when Andrade ran for office, an official with the leftist Workers’ Party asked him what race he would like to declare. He had a decision to make.

“I am going to mark Black as a way to recognize my ancestry and origin,” he thought. “Outside of Brazil, we would never be considered White. We live in a bubble in this country.”

But this year, when he ran again, no one asked him which race he preferred. Someone saw his picture and made the decision for him. He was put down as White. For Andrade, it felt like an erasure.

“It’s easy for some to say they’re Black or mixed or White, but for me it’s not easy,” he said. “And I’m not going to be someone who isn’t White all over the world but is White only in Brazil. If I’m not White elsewhere in the world, I’m not White.”

He’s Black. And if he seeks public office again in 2024, he said, he’ll make sure that’s how he will be known.

Ideias para apressar o fim do mundo (ISA)

Quinta-feira, 12 de Novembro de 2020

Blog do ISA

Nurit Bensusan, assessora do ISA e especialista em biodiversidade

É interessante pensar que o fim do mundo talvez seja um longo processo: nada de meteoro ou de explosões atômicas. Uma pandemia aqui, um evento climático extremo ali, menos comida, mais uma pandemia, secas catastróficas, menos comida ainda, mais uma pandemia, sede, fome, guerras, mais secas, mais pandemias, mais inundações… Enfim, a consolidação de um planeta hostil à nossa espécie.

Em relatório recém-lançado, a Plataforma Intergovernamental de Biodiversidade e Serviços Ecossistêmicos (IBPES, na sigla em inglês) chama o período em que estamos entrando, com a pandemia de Covid-19, de a “Era das Pandemias”. Diante dos dados expostos pelo relatório, o nome vem bem a calhar. Alguns deles, para dar o tom:- Estima-se que haja 1,7 milhões de vírus que ainda não foram descritos em mamíferos e aves. Desses, entre 540 mil e 850 mil teriam a capacidade de infectar humanos.

– Os mais importantes reservatórios de patógenos com potencial pandêmico são os mamíferos (em particular morcegos, roedores e primatas) e algumas aves, em especial as aquáticas, assim como os animais criados para a produção de proteína animal, como porcos, galinhas, camelos, etc.

– O risco de pandemias está aumentando rapidamente com a emergência de mais de cinco doenças novas em humanos a cada ano. Qualquer uma dessas tem potencial para se espalhar e se tornar uma nova pandemia.

– O risco é aumentado exponencialmente pelas modificações antropogênicas, tais como a perda de biodiversidade, a simplificação das paisagens e a degradação de ecossistemas.

No quesito “modificações antropogênicas” que aumentam exponencialmente o risco das pandemias, é que estão as ideias, tão bem implementadas por aqui, para apressar o fim do mundo. A aceleração do desmatamento e da degradação do ambiente, o descompromisso com o combate à crise climática e o desrespeito à diversidade social, cultural e de formas de estar no mundo têm sido nosso cotidiano.

Não há dúvida alguma que o atual governo brasileiro parece ter pressa para chegar ao apocalipse. A situação geral do planeta, porém, não é muito diferente. Ao invés de uma janela de oportunidades, a pandemia revelou-se um espelho quebrado cujo reflexo tememos ver. Uma das estranhas consequências da situação é que o inaceitável mundo em que vivíamos, transbordante de desigualdades, racismo, ansiedade, depressão e violência, parece ter se tornado não apenas tolerável mas até mesmo desejável. Não apenas não enxergamos outras possibilidades de futuro, como ansiamos por voltar a nossa vida pregressa.

Pulsão de morte ou confiança na tecnologia?

Curiosamente, o relatório do IBPES não surtiu grandes efeitos. Assim como os números crescentes de mortes por Covid-19, de hectares desmatados na Amazônia ou queimados no Pantanal, de toneladas de carbono lançadas na atmosfera ou de plástico no mar. Trata-se, será, de uma pulsão de morte da nossa espécie ou uma confiança excessiva nas soluções tecnológicas?

Além das ideias para apressar o fim do mundo que já conhecemos, algumas novidades têm chamado atenção. Uma delas é a mortandade de elefantes em Botswana, o lugar com a terceira maior população de elefantes africanos. Nos primeiros meses deste ano, 330 elefantes morreram envenenados por fontes de água contaminadas por cianobactérias, provavelmente uma consequência das mudanças climáticas.

Outra é a situação das praias de Kamtchaka, localizadas na costa leste da Rússia, local que faz a festa dos surfistas. Ali, no começo de setembro, as pessoas começaram a apresentar queimaduras na pele, vômitos e dificuldade para respirar. De lá para cá, milhares de animais marinhos já morreram.

As hipóteses ligadas à poluição não foram comprovadas, apesar dos níveis de elementos derivados do petróleo, de fosfato e de mercúrio estarem muito acima do aceitável. As pesquisas conduziram à conclusão que se trata de uma proliferação exacerbada de algas, que emitem toxinas e exaurem o oxigênio da água, causada pelas mudanças climáticas.

Ambiente hostil e egoísmo

Além de transformarmos o planeta num ambiente hostil para nós mesmos, estamos contribuindo para o rápido desaparecimento da biodiversidade. Se o apelo ético da responsabilidade de carregar tantas mortes nas costas não move a nossa espécie, o egoísmo deveria fazê-lo. É justamente a complexidade da paisagem, composta por várias espécies em múltiplas relações, que garante a contenção das zoonoses, impedindo que essas doenças que vêm dos animais silvestres cheguem aos humanos.

Essas moléstias são muitas e se tornam mais comuns à medida que vamos destruindo os ecossistemas e degradando os serviços que eles nos oferecem. Vale lembrar que a maioria das enfermidades humanas infecciosas que surgiram nas décadas recentes teve origem na vida silvestre e 65% de todos os patógenos humanos descobertos, desde 1980, foram identificados como vírus zoonóticos. Entre elas, estão a Zyka, a Febre do Rift Valley, a gripe aviária, a H1N1 e muitas outras.

A esse cenário, já bastante preocupante, soma-se o descongelamento acelerado do Ártico e do Permafrost, área de milhares de quilômetros quadrados de solos congelados que circunda o Ártico. Esse fenômeno começa a causar uma injeção de mais gases de efeito estufa na atmosfera, o encontro de animais que não conviviam antes e a possibilidade da emergência de novos e velhos patógenos, presentes nos restos mortais de espécies de outros tempos, como o mamute, ou de pessoas de outros séculos, como as vítimas de uma epidemia de varíola do fim do século XIX. Tudo isso aponta para um maior risco de novas doenças e de pandemias.

Mundo sem nós

Alguns livros e filmes já tentaram delinear como seria o mundo sem nós. Aparentemente, a Terra se recuperaria bem do estrago que estamos fazendo e talvez nem demorasse muitos milhares de anos para isso. A única coisa que sobraria, uma lembrança de nossa passagem pelo cosmos, seriam os plastiglomeratos, um material que pode ser descrito como um fragmento rochoso que reúne grãos de areia, detritos plásticos e materiais orgânicos, como conchas, partes de corais e madeiras, amalgamados por algo que já foi um plástico derretido. Sua origem remete a fogos causados por humanos, em geral para queimar lixo. Foram encontrados primeiro na praia Kamilo, no Havaí, em 2014, mas de lá para cá já foram identificadas em Bali, na Califórnia, na ilha de Madeira e em Ontário, no Canadá.

O relatório do IBPES aponta que ainda podemos escapar da Era das Pandemias, pois temos acumulado bastante conhecimento para traçar caminhos que nos permitam prever e evitar novas crises sanitárias. Isso, segundo o relatório, inclui localizar possíveis origens geográficas de novas pandemias, identificar hospedeiros- chave e patógenos com mais probabilidade de emergir e demonstrar como as mudanças ambientais e socioeconômicas estão relacionadas com a emergência de doenças. O relatório também traz um conjunto de mecanismos para tornar isso possível. Alguns estão ligados a um reforço de instrumentos multilaterais, como o estabelecimento de um conselho intergovernamental de prevenção de pandemias que, além de promover a cooperação entre governos, trabalharia com as três convenções da Eco -92 (Mudanças Climáticas, Biodiversidade e Combate à Desertificação), para desenvolver uma abordagem chamada de One Heath (uma saúde, em inglês). Trata-se de pensar uma abordagem que conecte saúde humana, saúde animal e questões ambientais.

Há várias outras recomendações tanto ligadas ao financiamento de atividades que degradam o meio ambiente como relacionadas com o consumo humano. O inusitado é que nada disso é novo. Sabemos de tudo isso e sabemos há muito tempo. Sabemos que essa relação predatória que cultivamos com a natureza tem um preço e que, fatalmente, ele seria cobrado.

A conclusão do relatório é que as transformações necessárias a evitar pandemias podem parecer de difícil implementação, caras e de impacto incerto. A isso, os autores contrapõem os custos de enfrentar uma pandemia e afirmam que esse caminho trará benefícios para a saúde, a biodiversidade e as nossas economias. Apesar de não ser algo novo, o caminho para evitar o fim do mundo é apontado, descrito e sinalizado. Resta saber se vamos, como sempre, fazer mais do mesmo, ou se vamos agarrar o touro pelos chifres, sobreviver, viver e deixar viver, aqui e agora, neste planeta.