Todos os posts de renzotaddei

Sobre renzotaddei

Anthropologist, professor at the Federal University of São Paulo

The New Climate (Harper’s Magazine)

READINGS — From the May 2017 issue

Psychedelic drug ayahuasca improves hard-to-treat depression (New Scientist)

DAILY NEWS 14 April 2017

Woman drinks mixture containing ayahuasca

From shamanistic ritual to medical treatment? Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

It tastes foul and makes people vomit. But ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic concoction that has been drunk in South America for centuries in religious rituals, may help people with depression that is resistant to antidepressants.

Tourists are increasingly trying ayahuasca during holidays to countries such as Brazil and Peru, where the psychedelic drug is legal. Now the world’s first randomised clinical trial of ayahuasca for treating depression has found that it can rapidly improve mood.

The trial, which took place in Brazil, involved administering a single dose to 14 people with treatment-resistant depression, while 15 people with the same condition received a placebo drink.

A week later, those given ayahuasca showed dramatic improvements, with their mood shifting from severe to mild on a standard scale of depression. “The main evidence is that the antidepressant effect of ayahuasca is superior to the placebo effect,” says Dráulio de Araújo of the Brain Institute at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte in Natal, who led the trial.

Bitter brew

Shamans traditionally prepare the bitter, deep-brown brew of ayahuasca using two plants native to South America. The first, Psychotria viridis, is packed with the mind-altering compound dimetheyltryptamine (DMT). The second, the ayahuasca vine (Banisteriopsis caapi), contains substances that stop DMT from being broken down before it crosses the gut and reaches the brain.

To fool placebo recipients into thinking they were getting the real thing, de Araújo and his team concocted an equally foul tasting brown-coloured drink. They also carefully selected participants who had never tried ayahuasca or other psychedelic drugs before.

A day before their dose, the participants filled in standard questionnaires to rate their depression. The next day, they spent 8 hours in a quiet, supervised environment, where they received either the placebo or the potion, which produces hallucinogenic effects for around 4 hours. They then repeated filling in the questionnaires one, two and seven days later.

Both groups reported substantial improvements one and two days after the treatment, with placebo scores often as high as those of people who had taken the drug. In trials of new antidepressant drugs, it is common for as many as 40 per cent of participants to respond positively to placebos, says de Araújo.

But a week into this trial, 64 per cent of people who had taken ayahuasca felt the severity of their depression reduce by 50 per cent or more. This was true for only 27 per cent of those who drank the placebo.

Psychedelic treatments

“The findings suggest a rapid antidepressant benefit for ayahuasca, at least for the short term,” says David Mischoulon of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “But we need studies that follow patients for longer periods to see whether these effects are sustained.”

“There is clearly potential to explore further how this most ancient of plant medicines may have a salutary effect in modern treatment settings, particularly in patients who haven’t responded well to conventional treatments,” says Charles Grob at the University of California, Los Angeles.

If the finding holds up in longer studies, it could provide a valuable new tool for helping people with treatment-resistant depression. An estimated 350 million people worldwide experience depression, and between a third to a half of them don’t improve when given standard antidepressants.

Ayahuasca isn’t the only psychedelic drug being investigated as a potential treatment for depression. Researchers have also seen some benefits with ketamine and psilocybin, extracted from magic mushrooms, although psilocybin is yet to be tested against a placebo.

Journal reference: bioRxiv, DOI: 10.1101/103531

Indigenous Science: March for Science Letter of Support

To the March for Science, DC and satellite marches across the nation and the world:

As Indigenous scientists, agency professionals, tribal professionals, educators, traditional practitioners, family, youth, elders and allies from Indigenous communities and homelands all over the living Earth we

Endorse and Support the March for Science.

As original peoples, we have long memories, centuries old wisdom and deep knowledge of this land and the importance of empirical, scientific inquiry as fundamental to the well-being of people and planet.

Let us remember that long before Western science came to these shores, there were Indigenous scientists here. Native astronomers, agronomists, geneticists, ecologists, engineers, botanists, zoologists, watershed hydrologists, pharmacologists, physicians and more—all engaged in the creation and application of knowledge which promoted the flourishing of both human societies and the beings with whom we share the planet. We give gratitude for all their contributions to knowledge. Native science supported indigenous culture, governance and decision making for a sustainable future –the same needs which bring us together today.

As we endorse and support the March for Science, let us acknowledge that there are multiple ways of knowing that play an essential role in advancing knowledge for the health of all life. Science, as concept and process, is translatable into over 500 different Indigenous languages in the U.S. and thousands world-wide. Western science is a powerful approach, but it is not the only one.

Indigenous science provides a wealth of knowledge and a powerful alternative paradigm by which we understand the natural world and our relation to it. Embedded in cultural frameworks of respect, reciprocity, responsibility and reverence for the earth, Indigenous science lies within a worldview where knowledge is coupled to responsibility and human activity is aligned with ecological principles and natural law, rather than against them. We need both ways of knowing if we are to advance knowledge and sustainability.

Let us March not just for Science-but for Sciences!

We acknowledge and honor our ancestors and draw attention to the ways in which Indigenous communities have been negatively impacted by the misguided use of Western scientific research and institutional power. Our communities have been used as research subjects, experienced environmental racism, extractive industries that harm our homelands and have witnessed Indigenous science and the rights of Indigenous peoples dismissed by institutions of Western science.

While Indigenous science is an ancient and dynamic body of knowledge, embedded in sophisticated cultural epistemologies, it has long been marginalized by the institutions of contemporary Western science. However, traditional knowledge is increasingly recognized as a source of concepts, models, philosophies and practices which can inform the design of new sustainability solutions. It is both ancient and urgent.

Indigenous science offers both key insights and philosophical frameworks for problem solving that includes human values, which are much needed as we face challenges such as climate change, sustainable resource management, health disparities and the need for healing the ecological damage we have done.

Indigenous science informs place-specific resource management and land-care practices important for environmental health of tribal and federal lands. We require greater recognition and support for tribal consultation and participation in the co-management, protection, and restoration of our ancestral lands.

Indigenous communities have partnered with Western science to address environmental justice, health disparities, and intergenerational trauma in our communities. We have championed innovation and technology in science from agriculture to medicine. New ecological insights have been generated through sharing of Indigenous science. Indigenous communities and Western science continue to promote diversity within STEM fields. Each year Indigenous people graduate with Ph.D.’s, M.D.’s, M.S.’s and related degrees that benefit our collective societies. We also recognize and promote the advancement of culture-bearers, Elders, hunters and gatherers who strengthen our communities through traditional practices.

Our tribal communities need more culturally embedded scientists and at the same time, institutions of Western science need more Indigenous perspectives. The next generation of scientists needs to be well- positioned for growing collaboration with Indigenous science. Thus we call for enhanced support for inclusion of Indigenous science in mainstream education, for the benefit of all. We envision a productive symbiosis between Indigenous and Western knowledges that serve our shared goals of sustainability for land and culture. This symbiosis requires mutual respect for the intellectual sovereignty of both Indigenous and Western sciences.

As members of the Indigenous science community, we endorse and support the March for Science – and we encourage Indigenous people and allies to participate in the national march in DC or a satellite march. Let us engage the power of both Indigenous and Western science on behalf of the living Earth.

Let our Indigenous voices be heard.

In solidarity,

ADD YOUR NAME BELOW, AND SCROLL DOWN FOR FULL LIST OF SIGNATORIES

If you are an ally, please write “ally” under tribal affiliation.

SIGNATORIES

1. Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), Professor of Environmental and Forest Biology, Director Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY

2. Dr. Rosalyn LaPier (Blackfeet/Metis), Research Associate, Women’s Studies, Environmental Studies, and Native American Religion. Harvard Divinity School

3. Dr. Melissa K. Nelson (Turtle Mountain Chippewa), Associate Professor of American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, President of the Cultural Conservancy, San Francisco, CA

4. Dr. Kyle P. Whyte (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), Timnick Chair in the Humanities, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

5. Neil Patterson, Jr. (Tuscarora) Assistant Director, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY and EPA Tribal Science Council.

6. Dr. Patty Loew, Professor, Department of Life Sciences Communication. University of Wisconsin-Madison

7. Patricia Cochran (Inupiat), Executive Director, Alaska Native Science Commission, Anchorage, AK

8. Dr. Gregory A. Cajete (Tewa-Santa Clara Pueblo), Director of Native American Studies-University College, Professor of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies-College of Education, University of New Mexico

9. Dr. Deborah McGregor (Anishinaabe), Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair, Indigenous Environmental Justice, Osgoode Hall Law School and Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University

10. Leroy Little Bear (Blackfoot), Professor Emeritus, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

11. Dr. Karletta Chief (Navajo), Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science. University of Arizona

12. Leslie Harper (Leech Lake Ojibwe), President, National Coalition of Native American Language Schools and Programs

13. Namaka Rawlins (Hawaiian), Aha Punana Leo, Hilo, Hawaii

14. Abaki Beck (Blackfeet/Metis), Founder, POC Online Classroom and Co-Editor of Daughters of Violence Zine

15. Ciarra Greene (Nimiipuu/Nez Perce), NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, Portland State University

16. Dr. Scott Herron (Miami/Anishinaabe), Professor of Biology, Ferris State University and Society of Ethnobiology President

17. Chris Caldwell (Menominee Nation), Director of Sustainable Development Institute at College of Menominee Nation

18. Jerry Jondreau (Keweenaw Bay Indian Community/Ojibwe), Director of Recruiting, Michigan Technological University – School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

19. Dr. Shelly Valdez (Pueblo of Laguna), Native Pathways, Laguna, NM

20. Melonee Montano (Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Traditional Ecological Knowledge Outreach Specialist, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission

21. Nicholas J. Reo (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), Assistant Professor of Native American and Environmental Studies, Dartmouth College

22. Dr. Daniela Shebitz (Ally), Associate Professor/Coordinator of Environmental Biology and Sustainability, Kean University

23. Denise Waterman (Haudenosaunee: Oneida Nation), Educator, Onondaga Nation School

24. J. Baird Callicott (Ally), University Distinguished Research Professor, UNT

25. Dr. Nancy C. Maryboy (Cherokee/Dine), Indigenous Education Institute; and University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Forestry Sciences

26. Dr. Jeannette Armstrong (Syilx Okanagan), Canada Research Chair, Okanagan Knowledge and Philosophy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan

27. Barbara Moktthewenkwe Wall (Bodwewaadmii Anishinaabe), Knowledge Holder, Graduate Student, Keene, ON

28. Michael Dockry (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), PhD, St. Paul, MN

29. Joan McGregor (Ally), Professor of Philosophy and Senior Sustainability Scholar Global Institute for Sustainability, Arizona State University

30. Mary Evelyn Tucker (Ally), Yale University

31. Dr. Vicki Watson (Ally), Professor of Environmental Studies, University of Montana

32. Dr. Adrian Leighton (Ally), Natural Resources Director, Salish Kootenai College

33. Dr. Michael Paul Nelson (Ally), Ruth H. Spaniol Chair of Renewable Resources and Professor of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy, Oregon State University

34. Philip P. Arnold (Ally), Associate Professor, Chair, Department of Religion, Syracuse University. Director Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center

35. Dr. Mark Bellcourt (White Earth Nation), Academic Professional – University of Minnesota

36. F. Henry Lickers (Haudenosaunee), Scientific Co- Chair HETF

37. Jane Mt.Pleasant (Tuscarora), Associate Professor, School of Integrative Science, Cornell University

38. Dr. Lisa M. Poupart (Lac Du Flambeau Ojibwe,) Associate Professor/Director of First Nations Education, University of Wisconsin Green Bay

39. Beynan T Ransom (St Regis Mohawk Tribe), Program Coordinator, Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program

40. Cheryl Bauer-Armstrong (Ally), Director, UW-Madison Earth Partnership, Indigenous Arts and Sciences

41. Aaron Bird Bear (Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation) Assistant Dean, School of Education, UW-Madison

42. Scott Manning Stevens (Akwesasne Mohawk), Director, Native American Studies, Syracuse University

43. Preston Hardison (Ally), Policy Analyst, Tulalip Natural Resources

44. Dr. Jonathan Gilbert, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission Director, Biological Services Division, GLIFWC

45. Ilarion Merculieff (Unangan – Aleut), President, Global Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways

46. Denise Pollock (Inupiaq – Native Village of Shishmaref), Alaska Institute for Justice

47. David Beck (Ally), Professor, Native American Studies, University of Montana

48. Dr. Pierre Bélanger (Ally), Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

49. Dan Sarna, Karuk Tribe Dept. of Natural Resources collaborator, UC Berkeley post-doctoral research fellow

50. Simon J. Ortiz (Acoma), Regents Professor of English and American Indian Studies

51. Bron Taylor (Ally), University of Florida

52. Dr. Ronald L. Trosper (Salish/Kootenai), Professor of American Indian Studies, University of Arizona

53. Tammy Bluewolf-Kennedy (Oneida Nation of New York), Undergraduate Admissions Counselor, Native American Liaison, Chancellor’s Council on Diversity and Inclusion, Syracuse University

54. Dr. Isabel Hawkins (Ally), Astronomer and Project Director, Exploratorium

55. Claire Hope Cummings (Ally), Lawyer, journalist, legal advisor to Winnemem Wintu Tribe

56. Linda Hogan (Chickasaw), University of Colorado, Professor Emerita

57. Laird Jones (Tlingit & Haida Central Council), Fisheries

58. Stewart Diemont (Ally), Associate Professor / SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

59. Kacey Chopito (Zuni Pueblo), Student, Syracuse University

60. Jason Delborne (Ally), Associate Professor, NC State University

61. Cassandra L Beaulieu (Mohawk), Laboratory Technician, Upstate Freshwater Institute

62. Nancy Riopel Smith (Ally), East Aurora, NY

63. Dr. Mary Finley-Brook (Ally), Associate Professor of Geography, University of Richmond

64. Michael Galban (Washoe/Mono Lake Paiute), Curator/Historian, Seneca Art & Culture Center

65. Cara Ewell Hodkin (Seneca), SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

66. RDK Herman (Ally), Baltimore, MD

67. Emily H (Ally), Delaware, OH

68. Dr. Dan Roronhiakewen Longboat (Haudenosaunee – Mohawk Nation), Associate Professor and Director of the Indigenous Environmental Studies and Science Program, Trent University

69. Dan Spencer (Ally), University of Montana

70. Katherina Searing (Ally), Associate Director, Professional Education / SUNY ESF

71. Dr. Robin Saha (Ally), Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Program, University of Montana

72. Andrea D Wieland (Ally), Career Counselor, FRCC

73. Dr. Colin Beier (Ally), Associate Professor of Ecology, Syracuse, NY

74. Dr. Michael J Dockry (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), St. Paul, MN

75. Matthew J Ballard (Shinnecock), Southampton, NY

76. Anthony Corbine (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa), Grants Coordinator, Natural Resources Dept.

77. Laura Zanotti (Ally), Associate Professor, Purdue University

78. Len Broberg (Ally), Professor/ Environmental Studies, University of Montana

79. Danielle Antelope (Eastern Shoshone / Blackfeet), Blackfeet Community College

80. Tomasz Falkowski (Ally), State Univeristy of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

81. Dr. Elizabeth Folta (Ally), Assistant Professor, Environmental Education & Interpretation Program Coordinator, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

82. Dr. Alexis Bunten (Aleut/Yup’ik), Indigeneity Program Manager/Bioneers

83. Susan Elliott (Ally), University of Montata

84. Cat Techtmann (Ally), Environmental Outreach Specialist

85. Marie Schaefer (Anishinaabe), Phd Student, Community Sustainability, Michigan State University

86. Dr. Ross Hoffman (Ally), Associate Professor, University of Northern British Columbia

87. Mary Elizabeth Braun (Ally), Acquisitions Editor, Oregon State University Press

88. Dr. Melanie Lenart (Ally), Faculty member, Science and Agriculture, Tohono O’odham Community College

89. Dr. Mehana Blaich Vaughan (Native Hawaiian, Haleleʻa, Kauaʻi), Assistant Professor, University of Hawaiʻi, Mānoa

90. Alyssa Mt. Pleasant (Tuscarora), Assistant Professor of Native American & Indigenous Studies, University at Buffalo

91. Dianne E. Rocheleau (Ally), Professor of Geography/Clark University

92. Jorge García Polo (Ally), SUNY – ESF

93. Jessica Lackey (Cherokee Nation), PhD Student- Natural Resource Sciences and Management, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

94. Katie Hinkfuss (Ally)

95. Dr. Jessica Dolan (Ally), Researcher/Adjunct Lecturer, McGill University, University of Pennsylvania; Conference co-ordinator, Society of Ethnobiology

96. Gregory J. Gauthier Jr. (Menominee), Sustainable Development Insitute

97. Lynda Schneekloth (Ally), University at Buffalo / SUNY

98. Dr. Mary Jo Ondrechen (Mohawk), Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University

99. Ali Oppelt (Ally), Engineer

100. Dr. Toben Lafrancois (Ally), Research Scientist, Northland College and Pack Leader of Zaaga’igan ma’iinganag

101. Jessie Smith (Ally), State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

102. Curtis Waterman (Onondaga Nation), Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force

103. Luis Malaret (Ally), Professor of Biology Emeratus/Community College of Rhode Island

104. Dan Meissner (Ally), D’Youville College

105. Ilana Weinstein (Ally), SUNY ESF

106. Dr Rebecca Kiddle (Ngati Porou, Nga Puhi), Lecturer, Victoria University of Wellington

107. Wallace J. Nichols (Ally), Senior Fellow, Center for the Blue Economy, Middlebury Institute of International Studies

108. Catherine M. Johnson (Ally), Graduate Research Assistant, PNW-COSMOS Montana State University

109. Ranalda Tsosie (Diné), Ph.D Student/University of Montana

110. Gyda Swaney (Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation), Associate Professor/Department of Psychology/University of Montana

111. Tara Dowd (Inupiaq, Village of Kiana), Consultant, Red Fox Consulting

112. Michael P. Capozzoli (Ally), University of Montana

113. Siddharth Bharath Iyengar (Ally), Graduate Student, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

114. Jen Harrington (Turtle Mountain Chippewa), Graduate Candidate Resource Conservation/ University of Montana

115. Judy BlueHorse Skelton (Nez Perce/Cherokee), Faculty, Portland State University Indigenous Nations Studies

116. Dr. Charles Hall (Ally), Professor Emeritus SUNY ESF

117. Michael Hathaway (Ally), Associate Professor, Anthropology, Simon Fraser University

118. Rosemary Ahtuangaruak (Native Village of Barrow)

119. Charles FW Wheelock (Oneida Nation), National New World Resource Futures

120. Hayley Marama Cavino (Ngati Whiti/Ngati Pukenga– New Zealand), Adjunct, Native American Studies, Syracuse University

121. Warren Matte (Gros Ventre – White Clay Nation), Harvard University Alumni

122. Richard Erickson (Ally), Science Teacher/Bayfield High School

123. Chandra Talpade Mohanty (Ally), Syracuse University

124. Lauren Tarr (Ally)

125. Elizabeth J. Pyatt (Ally), Lecturer in Linguistics, Penn State

126. Grisel Robles-Schrader (Ally)

127. Suzanne Flannery Quinn (Ally) Senior Lecturer, Froebel College, University of Roehampton

128. Natalie Rodrigues (Ally), Student

129. Betsy Theobald Richards (Cherokee Nation), The Opportunity Agenda

130. Beka Economopoulos (Ally), Executive Director, The Natural History Museum

131. Melvina McCabe, MD (Dine’ ), Professor and Associate Vice Chancellor for Native Health Policy and Service/University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center

132. Nancy Schuldt (Ally, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Water Program Coordinator

133. Crystal Lepscier (Menominee/Stockbridge-Munsee/Little Shell Ojibwe), 4H Youth Development Agent/Shawano County/UW Extension

134. Dr. Brigitte Evering (Ally) Research Associate, Indigenous Environmental Sciences/Studies, Trent University

135. Devon Brock-Montgomery (Ally), Climate Change Coordinator- Bad River Natural Resources Department

136. Bazile Panek (Anishinaabe), Photographer of Zaaga’igan Ma’iinganag and Youth Leader

137. Nikki Marie Crowe (Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Tribal College Extension Coordinator

138. Lemyra DeBruyn (Ally)

139. Abbey Feola (Ally)

140. Kate Flick (Ally), sciences educator

141. Laura Zanolli (Chickasaw), MSc/University of Montana

142. Kristiana Ferguson (Tuscarora), Sanborn, NY

143. Priscilla Belisle (Oneida Nation), Grant Development Specialist, Oneida Nation

144. Catherine Landis (Ally), Doctoral Candidate, SUNY ESF

145. Dr. Hedi Baxter Lauffer (Ally), Science Educator and Researcher

146. Brady Mabe (Ally), University of Virginia

147. Robin T Clark (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa), Sault Ste. Marie, MI

148. Miles Falck (Oneida Nation), Wildlife Section Leader, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission

149. Erica Roberts (Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina), PhD in Behavioral and Community Health, University of Maryland

150. Katelyn Kaim (Ally), State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

151. Patricia Moran (Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians), Conservation Coordinator

152. Tracy Williams (Oneida Nation Wisconsin), WolfClanFaithkeeper/DirectorOneidaLanguageDept

153. Jennie R. Joe, Professor Emerita, Dept of Family & Community Medicine,

154. Tana Atchley (Klamath Tribes – Modoc/Paiute), Tribal Workforce Development & Outreach Coordinator, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission

155. Himika Bhattacharya (Ally), Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, Syracuse University

156. Sonni Tadlock (Okanogan, Colville), BS Native Environmental Science, Northwest Indian College

157. David Voelker (Ally), Associate Professor of Humanities & History

158. Margaret Wooster (Ally), Watershed Planner and Writer

159. David O. Born, Ph.D. (Ally)

160. Jason Packineau (Mandan, Hidatsa Arikara, Pueblo of Jemez, Pueblo of Laguna), Harvard University

161. Janene Yazzie (Navajo Nation), Research Associate

162. Dr. Brian D. Compton (Ally), Native Environmental Science Faculty, Northwest Indian College

163. Giselle Schreiber (Ally), Undergraduate, SUNY-ESF

164. Dr. Antonia O. Franco (Ally), SACNAS Executive Director

165. Daniela Bernal (Ally), Communications & Marketing Coordinator, SACNAS

166. Haskey Fleming (Navajo Nation), Student at SUNY ESF

167. Annjeanette Belcourt (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nations) Associate Professor

168. Nicole MartinRogers (White Earth Nation), PhD in sociology

169. LeManuel Lee Bitsoi (Navajo Nation), Assistant Professor, Rush University Medical Center

170. Yoshira Ornelas Van Horne (Ally), Doctoral Student, University of Arizona Environmental Health Sciences

171. Penney Wiley (Ally), Masters of Science, Health & Human Development, MSU, Bozeman, MT

172. Kathryn Harris Tijerina (Comanche), President Emeritus, IAIA (ret.)

173. Rita Harris (Cherokee Long Hair Tribe), Ritas Remembrances, Owner.

174. Lawrence Ahenakew (Chippewa/Cree), Deputy Director, HR Payroll Help Desk

175. Dr. Mary Hermes (Mixed Indigenous Heritage), Associate Professor Curriculum and Instruction, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

176. Emily A. Haozous, PhD, RN, FAAN (Chiricahua Fort Sill Apache), Associate Professor, PhD Program Director, and Regent’s Professor, University of New Mexico College of Nursing

177. Chiara Cabiglio (Ally), SACNAS Social Media & Communications Coordinator / Aspiring Personal Vegan Chef

178. Liz Cochran (Ally), Retired Elementary Educator

179. Miriam Olivera (Mixteco)

180. Janine DeBaise (Ally), Faculty, SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry

181. Taylor Saver (Anishinaabe)

182. Roxana Coreas (Ally), Doctoral Student, University of California, Riverside

183. Guthrie Capossela (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe), MA, Nonprofit Management, Native American Liaison Rochester Public Schools

184. Rachelle Begay (Diné ), Program Coordinator, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona

185. Tom Ozden-Schilling (Ally), Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University Canada Program

186. Wesley Leonard (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma), Assistant Professor, University of California, Riverside

187. Tom BK Goldtooth (Ally), Indigenous Environmental Network, Executive Director

188. Scott Hauser (Upper Snake River Tribes), Foundation Executive Director

189. Suzanne Neefus (Ally), Michigan State University

190. Shay Welch (Cherokee, undocumented), Professor of Philosophy

191. Heidi McCann (Yavapai-Apache Nation), CIRES/NSIDC

192. Todd Ziegler (Ally), Research Area Specialist; University of Michigan School of Public Health

193. Lauren Cooper (Ally), Academic Specialist, Forestry Department, Michigan State University

194. Zachary Piso (Ally), Michigan State University

195. Alisa Bokulich (Ally), Professor, Boston University

196. Randy Peppler (Ally), University of Oklahoma

197. Rosalee Gonzalez, PhD, MSW (Xicana-Kickapoo), Arizona State University(Faculty)/Native American in Philanthropy (Research Consultant)

198. Michael Burroughs (Ally), Penn State

199. Ayrel Clark-Proffitt (Ally), Sustainability professional

200. Paul B. Thompson (Ally), W.K. Kellogg Professor of Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics, Michigan State University

201. LaRae Wiley (Colville Confederated Tribes), Salish School of Spokane

202. Mike Jetty (Spirit Lake Dakota), Indian Education Specialist, MT Office of Public Instruction

203. Colin Farish (Ojibwe by adoption and marriage), Musician

204. Ayanna Spencer (Ally), Michigan State University

205. Eleanor (Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian), Anthropologist

206. Stephanie Julian (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians) Indigenous Arts & Science Coordinator

207. Kirsten Vinyeta (Ally), University of Oregon

208. Laura (Bear River Band of Rohnerville Rancheria)

209. Evan Berry (Ally), American University

210. Sachem HawkStorm (Schaghticoke), Chief

211. Dr. Robin M. Wright, American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program AmDepartment of Religion, University of Florida

212. Dr. Bethany Nowviskie (Ally) Director, Digital Library Federation at CLIR and Research Associate Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Virginia

213. Arwen Bird (Ally), Woven Strategies, LLC

214. Robbie Paul, PhD (NezPerce), Retired, WSU

215. Elizabeth LaPensee (Anishinaabe and Metis), Assistant Professor of Media & Information and Writing, Rhetoric & American Cultures at Michigan State University

216. Gerald Urquhart (Ally), Michigan State University

217. Dr. Brianna Burke (Ally), Assistant Professor of Environmental Humanities at Iowa State University

218. David C Sands (Ally), Professor of Plant Pathology, Montana State University

219. Alex Lenferna (Ally), Fulbright Scholar, Philosophy Department, University of Washington

220. Robin M. Wright (Ally), American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program, University of Florida

221. Twa-le Abrahamson-Swan (Spokane), BS Environmental Science/Restoration Ecology, University of WA

222. Doug Eddy (Ally), PhD Student, Program in Ecology, University of Wyoming

223. Dr. Anthony Lioi (Ally), Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and English, The Juilliard School

224. Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes), Center for World Indigenous Studies

225. Johnny Buck (Wanapum/Yakama Nation), Student, Northwest Indian College

226. Henry Quintero (Apache), ASU

227. Dr. Nancy McHugh (Ally), Wittenberg University

228. . Neil Henderson (Oklahoma Choctaw), Univ. Minnesota Medical School

229. Sammy Matsaw (Shoshone-Bannock/Oglala Lakota), IGERT PhD student, ISTEM Scholar

230. Allegra de Laurentiis (Ally), Professor at SUNY-Stony Brook

231. Laura Schmitt Olabisi (Ally), Michigan State University Department of Community Sustainability

232. Andrew Jolivette (Atakapa-Ishak/Opelousa), Professor SF State American Indian Studies

233. Dr. Heidi Grasswick (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, Middlebury College

234. Emily Simmonds (Metis), Department of Science and Technology Studies

235. Stephen Hamilton (Ally), Professor, Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University

236. Michelle Murphy (Metis) Director Technoscience Research Unit, Professor WGSI, Steering Committee Environmental Data and Governance Initiative

237. Paloma Beamer (Ally), University of Arizona

238. Jaime Yazzie (Diné), Master of Science of Forestry Candidate, Northern Arizona University

239. Ramon Montano Marquez (Kickapoo, Kumeyaay, Pa’Ipai), Restorative Justice Implementation Strategist

240. Rose O’Leary (Osage, Tsa-la-gi, Quapaw, Mi’kmaq), Graduate Student University of Washington, Dartmouth College

241. Bill Brown (Anishinaabe), White Earth Resevation Aiiy

242. Dr. Amy Reed-Sandoval (Ally) Assistant Professor of Philosophy, The University of Texas at El Paso

243. Paul Willias (Ally), Squamish Tribe Fisheries

244. Audrey N. Maretzki (Ally), ICIK at Penn State Univ.

245. Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough (Native Village of Unalakleet), University of Alaska Anchorage

246. Michael Kaplowitz (Ally), Michigan State University

247. Fawn YoungBear-Tibbetts (White Earth Band Of MN Chippewa), Indigenous Arts and Sciences Founder, University of Wisconsin Earth Partnership program

248. Melinda Levin (Ally), University of North Texas

249. Dr. Kari Mari Norgaard (Ally), Associate Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies

250. Olivia Blyth (Ally), Teaching Fellow

251. Bart Johnson (Ally), Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

252. Orville H. Huntington (Huslia Tribe), Ally, Tanana Chiefs Conference Wildlife & Parks Director, EPA Tribal Science Council, Alaska Board of Fisheries, Alaska Native Science Commission

253. Beth Leonard (Shageluk Tribe – Alaska), Department of Alaska Native Studies – University of Alaska Anchorage

254. Lisa Fink( Ally), University of Oregon

255. Carla Dhillon (Ally) P.E. Phd Candidate, U of Michigan

256. Lucas Silva (Ally), University of Oregon

257. Benjamin Kenofer (Ally), Ph.D Student, Michigan State University

258. Lillian Tom-Orme (Dine’ – Navajo), University of Utah

259. Dr. Ryan E. Emanuel (Lumbee), Associate Professor and University Faculty Scholar, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University

260. Sue Cramer (Ally), Former social worker

261. Judith Ramos (Tlingit), Professor

262. Ashley Studholme (Ally), University of Oregon

263. Dr. Jack D. Cichy (Ally), Professor of Management & Sustainability, Davenport University

264. Iria Gimenez (Ally), Oregon State University

265. Kathy Jacobs (Ally), Professor and Director, Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions, University of Arizona

266. Delight Satter (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde), Health Scientist

267. Salma Monani (Ally), Gettysburg College

268. Jim Igoe (Ally), University of Virginia, Department of Anthropology

269. Rocío Quispe-Agnoli Quechua (Ally), Professor of Colonial Latin American Studies, Michigan State University

270. Jacqueline Cieslak (Ally), PhD Student in Anthropology, University of Virginia

271. Mary Black (Ally), Adaptation Program Manager, Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions, University of Arizona

272. Kenny Roundy (Ally), PhD Student, History of Science, School of History, Philosophy, and Religion at Oregon State University

273. Bill Tripp (Karuk Tribe) Deputy Director of Eco-cultural Revitalization

274. Michael O’Rourke (Ally), Department of Philosophy and AgBioResearch, Michigan State University

275. Eudora Claw (Navajo/Zuni), University of Nevada Las Vegas

276. Ruth Dan Stebbins, Community Association, Yup’ik Student

277. Kathryn Goodwin (Blackfeet), Los Angeles, CA

278. Dr. May-Britt Öhman (Lule Forest Sámi – FennoScandia), Researcher, Uppsala University, Sweden

279. Sierra Deutsch (Ally), PhD Candidate, Environmental, Sciences, Studies, and Policy. University of Oregon

280. Leilani Sabzalian (Alutiiq), Postdoctoral Scholar of Indigenous Studies in Education, University of Oregon

281. Elizabeth Ann R. Bird (Ally) – Spec. Fort Peck Tribes Montana State University Project Development Specialist

282. Jason Schreiner (Ally), Instructor, Environmental Studies Program, University of Oregon

283. Dr. Chris Clements (Ally), Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University

284. Edith Leoso (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa), Tribal Historic Preservation Officer

285. Jandi Craig (White Mountain Apache), Apache Behavioral Health Services

286. Coach Glen Bennett (Grand Traverse Bay Ottawa& Chippewa), Archery Coach Program Coordinator Michigan State University

287. Stacey Goguen (Ally), Northeastern Illinois University

288. Jennifer Sowerwine (Ally), Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, UC Berkeley

289. Angelica De Jesus (Ally), Graduate Student, Ford School of Public Policy

290. Theresa Duello (Ally), Associate Professor, University of WI Madison

291. Mike Chang (Ally), Makah Tribe

292. Natalie Gray (Ally), City of Seattle

293. Gyda Swaney (Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation), Department of Psychology, University of Montana

294. Dr. Theresa May (Ally), University of Oregon

295. Ida Hoequist (Ally), Graduate Student, University of Virginia

296. Stephen P. Gasteyer (Ally), Department of Sociology, Michigan State University

297. Dr. Rachel Fredericks (Ally), Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Ball State University

298. Monica List (Ally), Animal Welfare Specialist- Compassion in World Farming

299. Keith R. Peterson (Ally), Associate Professor, Colby College, Department of Philosophy

300. Corey Welch (Northern Cheyenne), SACNAS

301. Kathy Lynn (Ally), University of Oregon

302. Agnes Attakai (Navajo), Director Health Disparities College of Public Health/ Director of AZ INMED Medicine University of Arizona

303. Kirsten Vinyeta (Ally), Doctoral Student in Environmental Studies at the University of Oregon

304. Amanda Boetzkes (Ally), University of Guelph

305. Princess Daazhraii Johnson (Neets’aii Gwich’in), Holistic Approach to Sustainable Northern Communities, Cold Climate Housing Research Center

306. Dr. Sarah Fortner (Ally), Assistant Professor of Geology & Environmental Science, Wittenberg University

307. Colin Weaver (Ally), University of Chicago

308. Kristin Searle (Ally), Utah State University

309. fleur palmer (te Rarawa and Te Aupouri), auckland university of technology

310. Dr. Jeremy Schultz (Ally), Eastern Washington University

311. Rosemary Bierbzum (Ally)

312. Holly Hunts, Ph.D. (Ally), Montana State University

313. Maureen Biermann (Ally), Instructor and PhD Candidate

314. Ben Geboe (Yankton Sioux), Executive Director

315. Vanessa Hiratsuka, PhD MPH (Dine/Winnemem Wintu), Health Services Researcher

316. Beth Rose Middleton (Ally), Assoc. Professor, Native American Studies, UC Davis

317. Brian J. Teppen (Ally), Professor of Soil chemistry, Department of Plant, Soil, and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University

318. Adam Fix (Ally), PhD Candidate, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

319. Sheree Chase M.A. (Ally), Regional Historian

320. Osprey Orielle Lake (Ally), Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, (WECAN)

321. Megan A.Crouse (Ally), Hospice Maui

322. Craig Kauffman (Ally), Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon

323. Alex Poisson (Ally), Sustainability Coordinator / SUNY-ESF

324. Ashley Woody (Ally), University of Oregon

325. Brett Clark, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Utah

326. Naomi Scheman (Ally), Professor Emerita, University of Minnesota

327. Michael Ruiz (Ally), Graduate Student, Harvard University Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Boston Children’s Hospital – Department of Orthopedic Surgery

328. Shelly Vendiola (Swinomish Tribal Community), Community Engagement Facilitator

329. Elizabeth Gibbons (Ally), American Society of Adaptation Professionals

330. Kimla McDonald (Ally), The Cultural Conservancy

331. Kaya DeerInWater (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), Graduate Student, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

332. Nancy Lee Willet (Wampanoag), College of Marin

333. Julianne A. Hazlewood (Ally), University of California, Santa Cruz

334. Antoine Traisnel (Ally), University of Michigan

335. Dr. Julianne A. Hazlewood (Ally), Instructor, Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

336. Gleb Raygorodetsky (Ally), Biocultural Diversity Consultant

337. Amanda L. Kelley (Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone), University of Alaska Fairbanks

338. Iyekiyapiwin Darlene St. Clair (Bdewakantunwan Dakota), Associate Professor, St. Cloud State University

339. Angela Bowen (Coos), Director of Education

340. Meghan McClain (Ally), Tech–Microsoft

341. Wikuki Kingi (Maori / Hawaii), Cultural Symbologist / Master Indigenous Technologist / Navigator – Pou Kapua Creations; Planet Maori; TE HA Alliance

342. Tania Wolfgramm (Maori / Tonga), Cultural Psychologist / Systems Sculptor / Technologist / Evaluator – HAKAMANA; Pou Kapua Creations; TE HA Alliance; Smart Path Healthcare

343. Ann Marie Sayers (Costanoan/Ohlone.Indian Canyon Nation), Costanoan Indian Research……frounder

344. Robert L. Houle (Bad River Band of Lake Superior Indians), Executive Director of Bad River Housing Authority

345. Jason Stanley (Ally), Yale University

346. Marion Hourdequin (Ally), Associate Professor & Chair, Dept. of Philosophy, Colorado College

347. Sarah Kristine Baker (Muscogee Creek Nation/Euchee), Ally

348. Dr. Nicole Bowman (Mohican / Lenaape), Evaluator, University of WI Madison

349. Christian Cazares (Ally), Neuroscience Graduate Student

350. Roberta L Millstein (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, UC Davis

351. Janet Kourany (Ally), Department of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame

352. Dr. Elizabeth Minnich (Ally), A.A.C.& U.

353. Dominique M. Davíd-Chavez (Borikén Taíno), PhD Student Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, Colorado State University

354. Kristin K’eit (Inupiaq/Tlingit), Environmental Scientist, Bachelors of Science in Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining

355. Dr. Lorraine Code (Ally), Distinguished Research Professor, York University, Toronto, Canada

356. Erik Jensen (Ally), Michigan State University

357. Jerry Mander (Ally), Author, president Intl. Forum on Globalization

358. Forest Haven (Ts’msyen), PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology, University of California, Irvine

359. Margaret McCasland (Ally), Science educator; Earthcare Working Group, NYYM (Quaker)

360. Adam Briggle (Ally), University of North Texas

361. Irene Klaver (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, University of North Texas

362. Susannah R. McCandless, PhD (Ally), Global Diversity Foundation

363. Lona Sepessy (Ally), Librarian at Arrowhead Elementary School

364. Jason Smith (Ally), Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians Fisheries Research

365. Dr. Luan Fauteck Makes Marks (SE Sioux, SE Algonquian, California Indian), Independent Researcher

366. Mariaelena Huambachano (Quechua), Postdoctoral Research Associate in American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

367. Jo Rodgers (Ally), Community Engagement Coordinator, Willamette Farm & Food Coalition

368. Lisa Rivera (Ally), Associate Professor, UMass Boston

369. Lea Foushee (Tsalagi), U of MN research

370. Carolyn Singer (Shoshone-Bannock Tribe), N/A

371. Dr. Dan Shilling (Ally), Retired foundation director

372. Dr. Sibyl Diver (Ally), Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

373. Jeffrey McCarthy (Ally), Environmental Humanities, Utah

374. Kristin J. Jacobson (Ally), Stockton University

375. Elise Dela Cruz -Talbert (Native Hawaiian), University of Hawaii

376. Barbara Sawyer-Koch (Ally), Trustee Emerita, Michigan State University

377. Richard E.W. Berl (Ally), Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, Colorado State University

378. Ahmed Lyadib (Amazigh Morocco), Amazigh

379. Paige West (Ally), Barnard College and Columbia University

380. Jocelyn Delgado (Ally), UCSC Undergraduate researcher

381. Dr Krushil Watene (Maori, Tonga), Massey University

382. Jonathan Tsou (Ally), Iowa State University

383. David Naguib Pellow (Ally), University of California, Santa Barbara

384. Hafsa Mustafa (Ally), Researcher/Evaluator/Adjunct Faculty

385. Felica Ahasteen-Bryant (Diné), Director, Native American Educational and Cultural Center (NAECC), Purdue University and Chapter Advisor, Purdue AISES

386. Jess Bier (Ally), Erasmus University

387. Eun Kang, Environmental Studies, Korea Maritime & Ocean University

388. Gary Martin (Ally), Global Diversity Foundation

389. Cara O’Connor (Ally), BMCC-CUNY

390. Katina Michael (Ally), University of Wollongong

391. Mary Elaine Kiener, RN, PhD (Ally), Creative Energy Officer, ASK ME House LLC

392. Heather Houser (Ally), UT Austin

393. Dr. Ken Wilson (Ally), Retired (ex-University of Oxford; Ford Foundation; Christensen Fund)

394. Alia Al-Saji (Ally), McGill University

395. Kim Díaz (Ally), USDOJ

396. Alice M. McMechen (Ally), Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), Cornwall Monthly Meeting, NY

397. Gloria J Lowe (Cherokee Nation), Executive Director We Want Green, too

398. Cristian Ruiz Altaba (Ally), Biologist, Director of Llevant Natural Park ((Mallorca)

399. Brian and Iris Stout (Ally and Cherokee Nation), Forester and Author

400. Noelle Romero (Ally), UNC-CH Program Coordinator

401. Kathryn Krasinski (Ally), Adelphi University

402. Jane Cross (Ally), physician

403. Katie McShane (Ally), Associate Professor of Philosophy, Colorado State University

404. Nicole Seymour (Ally), Assistant Professor of English and Affiliated Faculty in Environmental Studies and Queer Studies, Cal State Fullerton

405. Marsha Small (Northern Cheyenne), Adjunct Instructor, Bozeman, MT

406. D.S. Red Haircrow (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) Writer, Psychologist, Master’s Student Native American Studies, Montana State University, Bozeman

407. Dr. John V. Stone (Ally), Applied Anthropologist, MSU

408. Paul Cook (Ally), Electro-Optical Scientist

409. Jennifer Mokos (Ally), Ohio Wesleyan University Dept. of Geology & Geography

410. James Matthew McCullough (Ally), North Central Michigan College

411. Vicki Lindabury (Ally), New York State Certified Dietitian Nutritionist

412. Roben Itchoak (Mary’s Igloo), Student, University of Oregon

413. Kath Weston (Ally/Romani), University of Virginia

414. Kelly Wisecup (Ally), Northwestern University

415. Becky Neher (Ally), University of Georgia

416. Sarah D. Wald (Ally), University of Oregon

417. Jill Grant (Ally), Environmental lawyer

418. Joseph Len Miller (Muscogee [Creek] Nation). University of Washington, Seattle

419. Richard Peterson (Ally), Professor Emeritus Michigan State University

420. Kevin Fellezs (Kanaka Maoli – Native Hawaiian), Columbia University

421. Jessica M. Moss (Ally), Georgia State University, Tribal Liaison

422. Christina Ferwerda (Ally), Independent Exhibit & Curriculum Developer

423. Lindsay MArean (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), University of Oregon

424. Andrea Catacora (Ally), Archaeologist

425. Cassie Warholm-Wohlenhaus (Ally)

426. Catriona Sandilands (Ally), Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University

427. Dr. Johnnye Lewis (Ally), Director, Community Environmental Health Program, University of New Mexico

428. Julie Williams (Ally), Consulting Archaeologist

429. Kerri Finlayson (Ally), North Central Michigan College

430. Alan Zulch (Ally), Tamalpais Trust

431. Ivette Perfecto (Ally), University of Michigan

432. Emily Jean Leischner (Ally), Graduate Student, Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia

433. Megan Carney (Ally), University of Washington

434. Andrea Catacora (Ally), Archaeologist

435. Janette Bulkan (Ally), University of British Columbia

436. Jillian Mayer, Master of Science candidate

437. Nancy Marie Mithlo, Ph.D. (Chiricahua Apache [Ft. Sill Apache]), Associate Professor, Occidental College and Chair of American Indian Studies, Autry Museum of the American West

438. Hayden Hedman (Cherokee Nation), University of Michigan

439. Juliet P. Lee (Ally), Prevention Research Center, PIRE

440. Kaitlin McCormick (Ally), Postdoctoral Researcher (Anthropology and Museum Studies) Brown University

441. Nancy Rosoff (Ally), Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator Arts of the Americas Brooklyn Museum

442. Kathryn Shanley (Nakoda), Native American Studies, University of Montana

443. Robin Morris Collin (Ally), Norma J. Paulus Professor of Law Willamette University College of Law

444. Albany Jacobson Eckert (Bad River Lake Superior Chippewa), University of Michigan

445. Lois Ellen Frank (Kiowa/Sephardic), Native American Chef/Owner Red Mesa Cuisine/Native Foods Historian/Educator/Adjunct Professor Institute of American Indian Arts

446. John Grim (Ally), Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

447. Don McIntyre (Anishinabek), Professor University of Lethbridge

448. Robert B. Richardson (Ally), Associate Professor, Michigan State University

449. Craig Hassel (Ally), University of Minnesota

450. Melinda J McBride (Ally), Anthropologist

451. Saori Ogura (Ally), University of British Columbia

452. Dr. Paulette Faith Steeves (Cree-Metis), UMASS Amherst

453. Mary Hynes (Ally), University of Illinois

454. Dr. Robert J. David- Indigenous Archaeologist (Klamath Tribes), Visiting Scholar, University of California Berkeley

455. Max Gordon (Ally), SUNY-ESF, Biomimicry Club President

456. Mechelle Clark (Chippewas of Stoney Point First Nation), Student, Western University

457. Marijke Stoll (Ally), PhD Candidate, Univesity of Arizona

458. inanc tekguc (ally), Global Diversity Foundation

459. Kevin J. O’Brien (Ally), Pacific Lutheran University

460. Dr. M.A. (Peggy) Smith (Cree), Vice-Provost (Aboriginal Initiatives), Lakehead University

461. Catherine V. Howard, Ph.D. (Ally), Independent Scholar

462. Robert Alexander Innes (Plains Cree/Saulteaux/Metis), Associate Professor, Department of Indigenous Studies, University of Saskatchewan

463. Joy Hendry Scot, Professor Emerita, Oxford Brookes University

464. Catherine V. Howard, Ph.D. (Ally), Independent Scholar

465. Kimberly Yazzie (Navajo), University of Washington

466. Heather Rose MacIsaac (Ally), Graduate Student of Applied Archaeology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania

467. Gabi May (Metis), University of Michigan

468. Dr Raquel Thomas-Caesar, North Rupununi District Development Board, Iwokrama International Centre For Rain Forest Conservation and Joy Bloser Ally New York University, Conservation Center

469. Kirby Gchachu (Zuni Pueblo), Retired Educator, Chaco Canyon Archeoastonomy Researcher

470. Dr. John Tuxill (Ally) Fairhaven College, Western Washington University

471. Barbara A. Roy (“Bitty”) (Ally), Professor, University of Oregon

472. Justin Lawson (Ally), University of Washington

473. Joanne Barker (Lenape), San Francisco State University

474. Angela A. McComb (Ally), Student, MA Public Archaeology, Binghamton University

475. Donna Tocci (Ally), Field Museum of Natural History (former)

476. Paul McCullough (Ally), retired

477. Dr. Annie Belcourt (Mandan Hidatsa Blackfeet Chippewa), Associate Professor

478. Penelope Myrtle Kelsey (Seneca descent), University of Colorado at Boulder

479. Wendy McConkey (Ally), Cross Cultural Sharing & Learning

480. Kristina M. Hill (Ally), M.A. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, East Carolina University

481. Mark Dowie (Ally), Author: The Haida Gwaii Lesson (Inkshares Press 2017)

482. Dara Shore (Ally), NPS

483. Dr. Brady Heiner (Ally), Assistant Professor of Philosophy, California State University, Fullerton

484. Avni Pravin (Ally), University of Oregon

485. Janice Klein (Ally) M.A., University of Birmingham (U.K.)

486. René Herrera (Ally), University of South Florida

487. Kevin Chang, Executive Director Kua’aina Ulu ‘Auamo (KUA)

488. Celina Solis-Becerra (Ally), PhD Student. University of British Columbia.

489. Gregory Armstrong (Ally), Holy Wisdom Monastery

490. Aurora Kagawa-Viviani (Hawaiian, Pauoa, Oʻahu), graduate student, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

491. Nerissa Russell (Ally), Cornell University

492. Joshua Dickinson (Ally), Forest Management Trust

493. Kristie Dotson (Ally), Michigan State University

494. Dominique M. Davíd-Chavez (Borikén Taíno), Indigenous Outlier (Grad Student), Colorado State University Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, NSF Graduate Research Fellow

495. Dr. Virginia Nickerson (Ally), Independent consulting researcher

496. Dr. Christa Mulder (Ally), University of Alaska Faribanks

497. Shu-Guang, Li Civil and Environmental Engineeing Michigan State University

498. Andrea Godoy (Shinnecock), Southampton, NY

499. Randolph Haluza-DeLay (Ally-US citizen), The King’s University

500. Sharyn Clough, PhD (Ally), Professor, co-director Phronesis Lab Oregon State University

501. Richard McCoy (Ally), Landmark Columbus

502. J. Saniguq Ullrich (Nome Eskimo Community), PhD student

503. Dr . Kat Napaaqtuk Milligan-Myhre (Inupiaq), University of Alaska Anchorage

504. Kaitlin McCormick (Ally), Postdoctoral Researcher, Anthropology and Museum Studies, Brown University

505. Kim Harrison (Ally), Professional Archaeologist

506. Penny Davies (Cymraeg Welsh), Ford Foundation

507. Erin Turner (Ally), MFA candidate in Social Practice at Queens College CUNY

508. Meagan Dennison (Ally), Graduate student

509. Deborah Webster (Onondaga Nation), Nedrow, New York

510. Kaipo Dye, MS – Columbia University (Native Hawaiian), University of Hawaii at Mania, Hawaii Community College – OCET

511. Philip Mohr (Ally), Curator, Des Plaines History Center

512. Jessica Brunacini (Ally), The Earth Institute, Columbia University

513. Dominic Van Horn (Ally), Shelby County Schools

514. Rosanna ʻAnolani Alegado (Kanaka ʻoiwi/Hawaiʻi), Assistant Professor, Oceanography, University of Hawaiʻi

515. Bryan Ness (Ally), Pacific Union College

516. Joni Adamson, PhD (Ally), Environmental Humanities and Sustainability

517. Dr. Michelle Garvey (Ally), Instructor: Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies, UMN

518. Sydney Jordan (Ally)

519. John-Carlos Perea (Mescalero Apache, Irish, Chicano, German), Associate Professor, American Indian Studies, College of Ethnic Studies, San Francisco State University

520. Huamani Orrego (Ally), Master’s student

521. Giancarlo Rolando (Ally), University of Virginia

522. Dr. Jessica Bissett Perea (Dena’ina – Knik Tribe) Assistant Professor of Native American Studies, University of California Davis

523. Julie Skurski (Ally), Anthropology, CUNY Graduate Center

524. Dr. Linda Marie Richards (Ally), Historian of Science, Oregon State University

525. Eric Thomas Weber (Ally), The University of Kentucky

526. Sarah Jaquette Ray (Ally), Humboldt State University

527. Nan Kendy (Ally), Green Party of British Columbia

528. James Sterba (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame

529. Katie McKendry (Ally), George Washington University

530. Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy (Lac Seul First Nation – Ojibway), Lecturer, Gender Studies

531. Miriam MacGillis (Ally), Director, Genesis Farm

532. Miriam Saperstein (Ally), Student at the University of Michigan

533. Emily-Bell Dinan (Ally), Graduate Student, Environmental Studies, University of Oregon

534. Danielle Kiesow (Ally), Indiana University of Pennsylvania

535. L. Irene Terry (Ally), University of Utah

536. Ann Allen (Ally), Independent Scholar, affiliated to Auckland University of Technology

537. Eleanor Sterling (Ally), Columbia University

538. Sandy Barringer (Ally), Reiki Master, Pranic Healer Level III, Shaman

539. Dr. Stacy Alaimo (Ally), Professor of English

540. Jennifer Shannon (Ally), University of Colorado

541. Eun Sook, Professor Environmental Policies

542. Mariaelena Huambachano (Quechua), Postdoctoral Research Associate in American and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

543. Janet Lyon (Ally), Associate Professor

544. Cassandra Bloedel (Navajo), Environmental Sciences and Conservation et al

545. Alaka Wali (Ally), Curator, The Field Museum

546. Sandra Luo (Ally), Middlebury College

547. Lesley k. Iaukea (Native Hawaiian), PhD student, University of Hawaii

548. John White (Ally), Tulane University, Community-based Conservation of Amazonian Food Plants Genetic Resources and Associated Indigenous Knowledge

549. Travis Fink (Ally), PhD Student, Anthropology, Tulane University

550. Eleanor Weisman (Ally), Allegheny College

551. Dr Albert Refiti (Samoa), Auckland University of Technology

552. Sheila Contreras (Ally), Associate Professor, Michigan State University

553. Eduardo Mendieta (Ally), Penn State University

554. Tim van den Boog (Arawak/Trio, Suriname), UBC

555. David Skrbina (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, University of Michigan (Dearborn)

556. Mark Sicoli (Ally), University of Virginia

557. Belinda Ramírez (Ally), Sociocultural Anthropology PhD Student, UC San Diego

558. Teri Micco (Ally), Artist

559. Wayne Riggs (Ally), Philosophy Department, University of Oklahoma

560. John Norder (Spirit Lake Tribe), Michigan State University

561. Dimitris Stevis (Ally), Colorado State University

562. Sherry Copenace (Anishinaabe), Ikwe

563. Associate Professor Deirdre Tedmanson (Ally), University of South Australia

564. Rebecca Albury (Ally), University of Wollongong (retired)

565. Dr. Tanya Peres (Ally), Anthroplogy

566. Laurie Begin (American – Ally), Occupational therapy

567. Lauren Nuckols (Ally), Penn State University

568. Jade Johnson (Navajo Nation), Undergraduate Research Assistant

569. Diane Thompson (Ally), Keeper of the home

570. Beverly Bell (Ally), Other Worlds

571. Ian Werkheiser (Ally), University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

572. Leana Hosea (Ally), Journalist

573. Paul Edward Montgomery Ramírez (Mankemé), University of York

574. Heather Davis (Ally), Penn State

575. Dr. David L. Mausel (Mvskoke), Forest ecologist, MTE

576. Catherine V. Howard, Ph.D. (Ally), Social Research Editing Services

577. B.T. Kimoto (Ally), Emory University

578. Sara Saba (Ally), Emory University

579. Maria Luisa Ciminelli (Ally), independent scholar

580. Sarah Buie (Ally), Professor Emerita, Clark University

581. Dave McCormick (Ally), PhD student, anthropology, Yale University

582. Michael D. Doan (Ally), Eastern Michigan University

583. Dr Tracey Mcintosh (Tuhoe, Aotearoa New Zealand ), Nga Pae o te Maramatanga, University of Auckland

584. Kelsey Amos (Ally), University of Hawaiʻi

585. Bob Rabin (Ally), Research meteorologist & student, Ilisagvik University

586. Julie Cotton, MS (Ally), Michigan State University, Sustainable Agriculture

587. Lisa Kretz (Ally), Assistant Professor, University of Evansville

588. Kiri Del;l (Ngati Porou), The University of Auckland

589. Carol Cooperrider (Ally), Former Archaeologist, retired Explora Science Center Graphic Designer

590. Darin Thomas (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), Graduate Student

591. Shawndina Etcitty (Navajo) Medical Laboratory Technician in Flow Cytometry and Hematology

592. Wyatt Musashi Maui Bartlett (Hawaiian ), Student

593. Sharon Ziegler-Chong (Ally), University of Hawaii at Hilo

594. Christine Winter (Ngāti Kahungunu), PhD Candidate

595. Alex Winter-Billington (Ngāti Kahungunu), PhD Candidate

596. Roberto Domingo Toledo (Ally), Independent Researcher (Philosophy and Sociology))

597. Steve Hemming (Ally), Associate Professor Flinders University

598. Kaushalya Munda (Bharat Munda Samaj, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India), M.A Sociology, & LLB.

599. Dana Dudle (Ally), DePauw University

600. Don Ihde, (Ally), Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus, Stony Brook University, NY, USA

601. Shobita Parthasarathy (Ally), University of Michigan

602. Suzanne Held (Ally), Professor of Community Health, Montana State University

603. Dr. Michael L. Naylor (Ally), Comprehensive Studies Program, University of Michigan, “Our World” Life-Skills Project, Washtenaw Community College

604. Jeremy Narby, Ph. D. (Ally), Nouvelle Planète

605. David Isaac (Ally), JD Student University of Western Ontario Faculty of Law

606. Dr. Raynald Harvey Lemelin (Ally), Lakehead University

607. Doug Medin (Ally), Professor of Psychology and Education and Social Policy

608. Dr. Michael Menser (Ally), Department of Philosophy, Brooklyn College, Earth and Environmental Science, CUNY Graduate Center; President of the Board, Participatory Budgeting Project

609. Dr. Sylvia Hood Washington (Piscataway,Creek,Cherokee Descendant), Editor in Chief Environmental Justice Journal

610. Susanna Donaldson, PhD (Ally), West Virginia University

611. Jessica Robinson (Ally), University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and the Environment

612. Robert Craycraft (Ally), M.A Anthrpology student, American University

613. Daniel L. Dustin (Ally), University of Utah

614. Dr. Nanibaa’ Garrison (Navajo), Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Seattle Children’s Research Institute and University of Washington

615. Elizabeth V. Spelman (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, Smith College

616. Patricia Kim (Ally), University of Pennsylvania

617. Timoteo Mesh (Yucatec Maya), PhD Candidate, University of Florida

618. Rebecca Hardin (Ally), University of Michigan

619. Allison Guess (Black collaborator), PhD Student

620. Natalie Sampson (Ally), University of Michigan

621. Alissa Baker-Oglesbee (Cherokee Nation), Northwestern University

622. Montana Stevenson (Ally), Student, School of Natural Resources and Environment/School of Business, University of Michigan

623. Dr. Leah Temper (Ally), Autonomous University of Barcelona

624. Allison Guess (Black collaborator), CUNY Grad Center program of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Human Geography)

625. Sara Smith (Oneida), Natural resource technician for Stockbridge-Munsee Community

626. Dr. Wendi A Haugh (Ally), Associate Professor of Anthropology, St. Lawrence University

627. Micha Rahder (Ally), Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Louisiana State University

628. Susan Knoppow (Ally), Wow Writing Workshop

629. Noah Theriault (Ally), University of Oklahoma

630. Alyssa Cudmore (Ally), Graduate Student

631. Adam J Pierce (Ally), PhD. Student Integrated Bioscience

632. Stephanie Diane Pierce (Ally), Biomimicry and education, content developer

633. Alex Peters (Ally), University of Michigan

634. Beverly Naidus (Ally), Associate Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, University of Washington, Tacoma

635. Tatiana Schreiber (Ally), Adjunct Faculty, Environmental Studies, Keene State College

636. Amy Michael (Ally), Albion College

637. Clement Loo (Ally), University of Minnesota, Morris

638. Johanna Fornberg (Ally), Graduate Student

639. Mike Ilardi (Ally), University of Michigan

640. Matt Samson (Ally)

641. Gabrielle Hecht (Ally), University of Michigan

642. Elizabeth Damon (Ally), Director Keepers of the Water

643. Erica Jones (Ally), Independent Scholar

644. Omayra Ortega

645. Roy Clarke (Ally), University of Michigan

646. Thomas Bretz (Ally), Utah Valley University

647. Les Field, Jewish University of New Mexico

648. Cassidy A. Dellorto-Blackwell (Ally), University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment

649. Lee Bloch (Ally), University of Virginia

650. Dale Petty (Ally), Professional Faculty, Advanced Manufacturing, Washtenaw Community College

651. Sofiya Shreyer (Ally), Anthropology Department, Bridgewater State University

652. Gordon Henry (White Earth Anishinaabe), Poet, Senior Editor, American Indian Studies Series, MSU Press

653. Joshua Lockyer, Ph.D. (Ally), Arkansas Tech University

654. bonnie chidester (ally), nurse community builder

655. Chris Fremantle (Ally), Edinburgh College of Art

656. Eric Boynton (Ally), Allegheny College

657. R. Eugene Turner (Ally), Louisiana State University

658. Kate Chapel (Ally), University of Michigan

659. Alex Kinzer (Ally), University of Michigan

660. K. Arthur Endsley (Ally), PhD Candidate, University of Michigan

661. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman (Ally), Senior Scientist, Pesticide Action Network

662. Braden Elliott (Ally), PhD Candidate, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Dartmouth College

663. Dr. Yogi Hale Hendlin (Ally), Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of California, San Francisco

664. Robert Geroux (Blackfeet [Amskapi Pikuni] descent), IUPUI

665. Brianna Bull Shows (Crow), Student researcher

666. Grace Ndiritu (Ally), Visual Artist

667. Sarah Barney (Ally), University of Michigan

668. Richard Tucker (Ally), University of Michigan

669. Andrew Kinzer (Ally), University of Michigan – School of Natural Resources and Environment

670. Iokiñe Rodriguez (Ally) to Latin American Indigenous Peoples), Senior Lecturer, School of International Development, University of East Anglia

671. Kim Nace (Ally), Rich Earth Institute

672. Laura Baker (Ally), Marketing

673. Melissa Wallace (Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Information Technology

674. Jame Schaefer, Ph.D. (Ally), Marquette University

675. Schuyler Chew (Mohawk, Six Nations of the Grand River), Doctoral Student, Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona

676. Annie Mandart (Ally), from Tuscarora Nation), Academic Affairs, Daemen College

677. Steve Breyman (Ally), Associate Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

678. Courtney Carothers (Ally), University of Alaska

679. Dr. Renee A. Botta Ally Associate Professor, Global Health and Development Communication, University of Denver

680. Gregory Smithers (Ally), Virginia Commonwealth University

681. Jasmine Pawlicki (Sokaogon Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Graduate Student-University of Arizona; Information Resources Assistant Sr.-University of Michigan Library Operations

682. Emily Blackmer (Ally), Former research assistant at Dartmouth College

683. Michael E. Bird MSW-MPH (Santo Domingo/Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo), Past President American Public Health Association

684. Kelli Herr (Ally), Student at Penn State University

685. Lilly Fink Shapiro (Ally), University of Michigan

686. Dr. Kelly S Bricker (Ally), The University of Utah, Parks, Recreation, and Tourism

687. Jim Maffie (Ally), University of Maryland

688. Basia Irland (Ally), Professor Emerita, UNM

689. Kelly S Bricker (Ally), University of Utah

690. Anapaula Bazan Munoz (Ally), Pennsylvania State University

691. Blaire Topash-Caldwell (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi), University of New Mexico

692. Todd Mitchell (Swinomish Environmental Director), Swinomish Department of Environmental Protection

693. Elizabeth H Simmons (Ally), Michigan State University, Department of Physics & Astronomy

694. Malia Naeole-Takasato (Kanaka Maoli), Educator

695. Joseph Paki (Ally), University of Michigan

696. J D Wainwright (Ally), Ohio State University

697. Fatma Müge Göçek (Ally), Professor of Sociology

698. Jennifer Welchman (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, University of Alberta

699. Kimber Dawson (Descendant of Fort Peck Assiniboine Sioux and Colville Confederated Tribes) The Pennsylvania State University

700. Kennan Ferguson (Ally), Center for 21st Century Studies, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

701. Amara Geffen (Ally) Allegheny College

702. Dennis Kirchoff (Ally), Engineer

703. Nathan Martin (Oneida of Wi and Menominee), ASU graduate

704. Dr. Elizabeth DeLoughrey (Ally), Professor, University of California

705. Peter Kozik (Ally), Keuka College

706. Raymond De Young (Ally), University of Michigan

707. Amelie Huber (Ally), PhD Candidate, Institute of Environmental Science & Technology, Autonomous University Barcelona

708. Janet Fiskio (Ally), Oberlin College

709. Stacey Tecot (Ally), University of Arizona

710. Kate A. Berry (Ally), University of Nevada, Reno

711. Alice Elliott (Ally), Master’s candidate, University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment

712. Vitor Machado Lira (Ally), Circlepoint/ University of Michigan

713. Chris Karounos (Ally), Master’s Student University of Michigan

714. Agustin Fuentes (Ally), University of Notre Dame

715. Sally Haslanger (Ally), Ford Professor of Philosophy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

716. Bonnie Mennell (Ally), Educator

717. Tim Richardson (Uyak Natives, inc), Government Affairs consultant

718. April Richards (Ally), University of Michigan

719. Melissa Watkinson (Chickasaw), University of Washington

720. Sharon Traweek (Ally), UCLA

721. Stefano Varese (Ally), Professor Emeritus of NAS-UC Davis

722. Dr. MJ Hardman (Jaqi people of South America, Jaqaru – Tupe, Yauyos, Lima, Perú), U of Florida (emeritus)

723. Jamie Beck Alexander (Ally), Nest.org

724. Eric Palmer (Ally), Allegheny College

725. Dr. Chellie Spiller (Maori – Ngati Kahungunu), University of Auckland

726. Margaret Susan Draskovich Mete (Ally), Associate Professor of Nursing, University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA); Indigenous Studies PhD student at University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF)

727. Anne Elise Stratton (Ally), University of Michigan

728. Frederique Apffel-Marglin (Ally), Smith College, Dept of Anthropology (Emeritus)

729. Diana Chapman Walsh (Ally), President emerita, Wellesley College

730. . Kristina Meshelski (Ally), California State University, Northridge

731. sean kelly (ally), CIIS

732. Mike Fortun (Ally), Department of Science and Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

733. Chris Mcbride (Pākehā / Walking alongside /Ally), Curator/Artist The Kauri Project Aotearoa

734. Neal Salisbury (Ally), Barbara Richmond 1940 Professor Emeritus in the Social Sciences (History) Smith College

735. Marie Berry (Ally), University of Denver

736. Ursula K Heise (Ally), Marcia H. Howard Chair in Literary Studies, Department of English and Institute of the Environment & Sustainability, UCLA

737. Vanda Radzik (Ally), Associate of the Iwokrama International Centre for Rain Forest Conservation & Development

738. Pete Westover (Ally), Adjunct Professor of Ecology, Hampshire College

739. Dr. Christina Holmes (Ally), DePauw University

740. Mike Burbidge (Ally), University of Michigan

741. Richard J Kulibert (Ally), Nannyberry Native Plants

742. Katherine Gordon (Ally), University of California Riverside

743. Dr. Chaone Mallory (Ally), Discursive Activist

744. Linda Ayre de Varese (Ally), Artist and Teacher

745. Dr. Claudia J. Ford (Non Citizen Cherokee), Faculty, Rhode Island School of Design

746. Dr. Chaone Mallory (Ally), Associate Professor of Environmental Philosophy

747. Joy Hannibal (Belauan/Palauan), Academic Advisor, Michigan State University

748. Marina Zurkow (Ally), artist and educator, ITP, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU

749. Luisa Maffi (Ally), Terralingua

750. Denise Burchsted (Ally), Assistant Professor, Keene State College

751. Lindy Labriola (Ally), Student

752. Beth Preston (Ally), Professor of Philosophy, University of Georgia

753. Eaton Asher (Ally), Western UniversityEric Ederer Ally Public Health MPH

754. Andrew Ross (Ally), Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

755. sakej younblood henderson (Chickasaw), Native Science Academy

756. Amy Kuʻuleialoha Stillman (Native Hawaiian), University of Michigan

757. Gretel Ehrlich (Ally: Inuit), Published writer

758. Watson Puiahi (Areare Namo Araha Council of Chief), ILukim Sustainability Solomon Islands

759. David Schlosberg (Ally), University of Sydney, Sydney Environment Institute

760. Jean Jackson (Ally), Professor of Anthropology Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

761. Julie Gaffarel (Ally), Agronomist and doula

762. Antonina Griecci Woodsum (Ally), Columbia University Graduate Student

763. Todd May (Ally), Clemson University

764. Kathleen Dean Moore (Ally), Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Oregon State University

765. Phil Rees (Ally), Terralingua

766. Dr. J. Lin Compton, PhD (Cherokee, Mohawk ), Professor Emeritus, University of Wiscosinnsin

767. Kristina Anderson (Ally), Graduate Student

768. August Pattiselanno (Ambonese), Agribusiness Department, Faculty of Agricultural, Pattimura University

769. Susana Nuccetelli (Ally), St. Cloud State University

770. Khadijah Jacobs (Navajo Nation), Student at UNM

771. Gary Seay (Ally), Medgar Evers College/CUNY

772. Thomas K Seligman (Ally), Stanford University

773. Hiram Larew, Ph.D. (Ally), Retired, US Department of Agriculture

774. Joan Baron (Ally), environmental artist

775. Lisa Heldke (Ally), Professor of Philosophy; Director, Nobel Conference, Gustavus Adolphus College

776. Chad Okulich (Ally), Teacher

777. Liza Grandia (Ally), Associate Professor, Department of Native American Studies, UC-Davis

778. Rebecca Alexander (Ally), Assistant Professor of Education Studies, DePauw University

779. Larry Beck, Ph.D. (Ally), San Diego State University

780. Dr. Kevin Elliott (Ally), Associate Professor in Lyman Briggs College, Dept. of Fisheries & Wildlife, and Dept. of Philosophy, Michigan State University

781. Amanda Meier (Ally), PhD Candidate, University of Michigan

782. Dr. Bruce D. Martin (Ally), The Pennsylvani State University

783. Janie Simms Hipp, JD, LLM (Chickasaw), Director, Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, University of Arkansas School of Law

784. Philip Deloria (Dakota), University of Michigan

785. Geoffrey Johnson (Ally), University of Oregon

786. Dr. James Crowfoot (Ally), Professor and Dean Emeritus, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan

787. Gregory J. Marsano (Ally), Environmental Law and Policy Student, Vermont Law School

788. Dominic Bednar (Black), University of Michigan, Doctoral student

789. Devin Hansen (Sugpiaq), Forestry

790. Shona Ramchandani (Ally), Science Museum of Minnesota

791. Dr. Sean Kerins (Ally), Fellow, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University

792. Jill Hernandez (Ally), Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Texas at San Antonio

793. John Grey (Ally), Michigan State University

794. Ann Regan (Ally), Minnesota Historical Society Press

795. Nancy Rich (Ally), Adjunct Professor, Environmental Biology, Springfield Technical Community College

796. Dr. Florence Vaccarello Dunkel (Sicilian Ally), Associate Professor of Entomology, Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology,Montana State University

797. Melissa Krug (Allly), Temple University

798. Joan Carling (Kankanaey-Igorot), Former member- Expert member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

799. Dennis Longknife Jr (Ally), Tribal Climate Change Scientist

800. Char Jensen (Ally), Naturopathic Physician, Spiritual Advisor, Teacher, Mentor

801. Guillermo Delgado-P. (Quechua linguistics), Anthropology Department, Univ. of California Santa Cruz

802. Georgina Cullman (Ally), American Museum of Natural History

803. Dr. Elizabeth Allison (Ally), California Institute of Integral Studies

804. Jeff Peterson (Alutiiq tribe of Old Harbor), Tourism business owner

805. Kris Sealey (Ally), Associate Professor of Philosophy, Fairfield University

806. Elizabeth Hoover (Mohawk/Mi’kmaq), Assistant Professor of American Studies, Brown University

807. David H. Kim (Ally), U of San Francisco

808. Jamie Holding Eagle (Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation), North Dakota State University

809. Dr. David L. Secord (Ally), University of Washington, Simon Fraser University, and Barnacle Strategies Consulting

810. Susanna B Hecht (Ally), UCLA and Graduate Institute for International Development,. Geneva

811. Raquell Holmes (Ally), Founder, improvscience; Assistant Research Prof. Boston University

812. Shakara Tyler (Ally), Graduate Student, Michigan State University

813. Irene Perez Llorente (Ally), UNAM

814. Christina Callicott (Ally), University of Florida

815. Julie Marckel (Ally), Science Museum of Minnesota

816. Elsa Hoover (Algonquin Anishinaabe), Columbia University

817. Jennifer Gardy (Ally), University of British Columbia

818. Nicole Sukdeo (Ally), University of Northern British Columbia

819. Kristina Mani (Ally), Oberlin College

820. Ricky Bell (Ngāti Hine, Aotearoa – New Zealand), University of Otago

821. Kimberly Danny (Navajo), Ph.D. Student, University of Arizona

822. Samuel M. ʻOhukaniʻōhiʻa Gon III (Hawaiian), The Nature Conservancy of Hawaiʻi; University of Hawaiʻi

823. Yi Deng (Ally), Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of North Georgia

824. Noelani Puniwai (Kanaka Maoli), University of Hawaii at Manoa

825. Yiran Emily Liu (Ally), Undergraduate Student Researcher

826. Britt Baatjes (Ally), Researcher

827. Dr. Stephanie Aisha Steplight Johnson (Ally), Higher Education Administrator

828. Jennifer Gunn (Ally), University of Minnesota

829. Andrea R. Gammon (Ally), PhD Researcher

830. Darren J. Ranco, PhD (Penobscot), University of Maine

831. Mascha Gugganig (Ally), Munich Center for Technology in Society, Technical University Munich

832. Jessie Pauline Collins (Cherokee-Saponi), Citizens’ Resistance at Fermi 2 (CRAFT)Sophia

833. Efstathiou (Ally) Programme for Applied Ethics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

834. David Tomblin (Ally), Director: Science, Technology and Society Program, University of Maryland

DF contrata Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral para pedir chuvas, diz entidade (G1)

Médiuns da entidade já fizeram convênios com SP e RJ, em tempos de crise hídrica; atuação é gratuita, diz porta-voz. Governo diz desconhecer parceria.


Fotografia de longa exposição de raios e tempestade no Distrito Federal (Foto: Felipe Bastos/Arquivo pessoal)

Fotografia de longa exposição de raios e tempestade no Distrito Federal (Foto: Felipe Bastos/Arquivo pessoal) 

Sem soluções de curto prazo para a crise hídrica, o governo do Distrito Federal recorreu à espiritualidade para reforçar as chuvas e encher os reservatórios. No início de março, a Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral – entidade esotérica que teria o poder de controlar o clima – montou um “quartel-general” em Luziânia, no Entorno, para adiar a chegada da estiagem ao Planalto Central.

A informação foi confirmada ao G1 pelo porta-voz da fundação, Osmar Santos – uma das duas únicas pessoas a entrar em “contato direto” com o espírito do cacique. Segundo ele, a parceria não prevê investimento público, e deve ser publicada em Diário Oficial nos próximos dias. A Caesb e o Palácio do Buriti dizem não ter conhecimento do convênio.

Segundo o porta-voz, a operação será similar à que foi empregada em São Paulo e no Rio de Janeiro, em 2015, para conter a crise hídrica que secou os reservatórios daquela região.

Em fevereiro, o blog “Gente Boa”, do jornal “O Globo”, informou que o prefeito João Doria tinha fechado nova parceria com a fundação. “Quem nos indicou para o governo de Brasília foi o governador [do Rio], Luiz Fernando Pezão, que tocava essa operação por lá”, diz Santos.

Chuva no Eixo Monumental, no centro de Brasília, em imagem de arquivo (Foto: Nilson Carvalho/GDF/Divulgação)

Chuva no Eixo Monumental, no centro de Brasília, em imagem de arquivo (Foto: Nilson Carvalho/GDF/Divulgação) 

“Começamos há uns 20 dias. [A intervenção] Consiste em prolongar esse período chuvoso por mais uns dias, para tornar o outono e o inverno mais úmidos. Também queremos antecipar o período chuvoso já para setembro.”

Em anos “normais”, a temporada de chuvas no DF começa em meados de outubro, e se estende até o mês de março. Se o clamor ao cacique for atendido, as nuvens devem continuar sobre a capital federal por, pelo menos, mais dez dias.

“É um processo gradual, porque você não pode mexer com a natureza de qualquer jeito, causando efeito colateral. Mas vão ser as águas de abril, e não de março, que vão fechar o verão.”

No site da Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral, consta que o espírito que dá nome à entidade “já teria sido Galileu Galilei e Abraham Lincoln”. De acordo com o texto, a missão da fundação é “minimizar catástrofes que podem ocorrer em razão dos desequilíbrios provocados pelo homem na natureza”.

Além do socorro às crises hídricas, a fundação já foi acionada pelos governos estaduais, pela União e até por outros países para garantir o céu limpo em grandes eventos – Rock in Rio, festas de réveillon e Olimpíadas, por exemplo.

No site oficial da Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral, constam extratos de convênios firmados com as cidades de São Paulo e Rio, e com os estados de Santa Catarina, Paraná e Rio Grande do Sul. Segundo a entidade, o contrato a ser oficializado com o DF foi feito “nos mesmos moldes”.

Chuva encobre a Torre de TV, no centro de Brasília, em imagem de arquivo (Foto: Toninho Tavares/GDF/Divulgação)

Chuva encobre a Torre de TV, no centro de Brasília, em imagem de arquivo (Foto: Toninho Tavares/GDF/Divulgação) 

Logística

O porta-voz da fundação afirma que a base de operações foi montada em Luziânia, a 60 km do centro de Brasília, por uma questão de logística. Sem dinheiro público, as viagens dos líderes espirituais entre SP, GO, RJ e DF são custeadas por dez empresas privadas desses estados, segundo ele.

“Nós vamos pegar três estações. Chegamos no fim do verão, então devemos pegar o outono, o inverno, até o próximo verão. A fundação funciona como um airbag climático, ou seja, não evita os acidentes. É uma contenção de danos”, diz Santos.

Na última semana, a médium Adelaide Scritori esteve pessoalmente em Luziânia. Filha do fundador Ângelo Scritori – que dizia manter contato direto com o espírito de Padre Cícero –, é ela quem incorpora o Cacique Cobra Coral e faz os pedidos ao plano astral.

Além de porta-voz, Osmar Santos também auxilia no diálogo do espírito com o mundo real. “Ela é uma médium inconsciente, então, o cacique fala comigo através [do corpo] dela”, explica.

Reservatório de Santa Maria, no Distrito Federal, com capacidade cheia, no fim da temporada de chuvas de 2016 (Foto: Toninho Tavares/GDF/Divulgação)

Reservatório de Santa Maria, no Distrito Federal, com capacidade cheia, no fim da temporada de chuvas de 2016 (Foto: Toninho Tavares/GDF/Divulgação) 

G1 tentou contato direto com Adelaide nesta quinta, mas foi informado de que a médium estava “em trânsito” e não poderia atender ao pedido de entrevista. Questionado, Santos afirmou que o Cacique Cobra Coral não envia mensagens específicas, e nem dá conselhos aos governantes.

“Ele cobra que façam a lição de casa. Tipo: ‘não podemos ajudar os homens de maneira permanente, se fizermos por eles aquilo que eles podem e devem fazer por si próprios'”.

A “lição de casa” cobrada pelo espírito, de acordo com Santos, inclui a conclusão das obras de captação de água na Usina Hidrelétrica de Corumbá IV (entre o DF e Goiás) e no Lago Paranoá. O primeiro projeto está parado por suspeita de irregularidades, e o segundo recebeu aporte recente de R$ 55 milhões da União.

81 COMENTÁRIOS

Este conteúdo não recebe mais comentários.

 

Cleuber Rocha

HÁ UM DIA

Porque esse povo não vai la no nordeste tentar fazer alguma coisa,isso no minimo é curioso,mas deixa pra lá…

20

 

Bruno Nobrega

HÁ UM DIA

01/04/2017 kkkkkkkkkkkk

00

 

Cleuber Rocha

HÁ UM DIA

Se vier agua mesmo através deste espiritismo não vejo problema,mas que chega a ser engraçado o governo recorrer a esses tipos de coisa.

00

 

Jean Pereira

HÁ 3 DIAS

Que os índios e caboclos da natureza tragam as águas dos céus.

43

 

Jean Pereira

HÁ 3 DIAS

Que os índios e caboclos da natureza tragam as águas dos céus…

03

 

Rogerio Marques

HÁ 3 DIAS

Isso deve ser uma Piada…..

41

 

Geraldo Barros

HÁ 4 DIAS

Lamentável, quando um Governo desconhece o poderio de Deus, e vai consultar os demônios; é de extrema tristeza a situação!

6641

 

Jean Pereira

HÁ 3 DIAS

Demônio é vc…

85

 

Jean Pereira

HÁ 3 DIAS

E isso aí. Que os índios e caboclos que manejam os elementos da natureza tragam as águas dos céus…

42

 

Jhonnata Medeiros

HÁ 3 DIAS

UÉ. onde está o “estado laico” do poder público? a constituição foi instituída sobre a proteção de Deus correto concurseiros??

54

 

Sergio Santos

HÁ 4 DIAS

Não estou acreditando no que acabei de lê, o povão acreditar nessas bobagens, tudo bem, mas entidades governamentais recorrer a grupos espirituais para resolver problemas , é o fim do mundo, pessoas que acreditam no mundo espiritual só pode ser retardada!!

149

 

Andre Olavo

HÁ 3 DIAS

KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK

12

 

Carlos Silva

HÁ 3 DIAS

se o meu povo que se chama pelo meu nome se humilhar e orar,e me buscar a minha face e se converter dos seus maus caminhos, então eu ouvirei dos céus, e perdoarei os seus pecados, e sararei a sua terra. ll cronicas 7: 14 está ai a receita

4210

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 3 DIAS

mas não precisa de licitação ou contratação emerencial pra isso né?

24

 

Kelvin

HÁ 3 DIAS

Se macumba desse resultado o campeonato baiano terminava empatado

132

 

Marcio L.

HÁ 4 DIAS

sera que pra trazer chuva os caras vão fazer a dança da chuva kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

101

 

Bruno Novais

HÁ 3 DIAS

Lavagem de dinheiro

163

 

Kleiton Barros

HÁ 3 DIAS

É sério isso gente !! ??

171

 

Fernando Gimenez

HÁ 3 DIAS

Não

10

 

Jairo J.gonçalves

HÁ 3 DIAS

quanto isso vai custar…

42

 

Fernando Gimenez

HÁ 3 DIAS

Leia a notícia antes de comentar.

51

 

Warley

HÁ 3 DIAS

vamos enviar para o Piauí e vamos fazer chover la!!!!!!!

201

 

Lúcio Gilbert

HÁ 3 DIAS

E eu pensava que já tinha visto tudo! Que piada de mal gosto!!!!

192

 

Sharles Sa

HÁ 3 DIAS

Sou mais a macumba da minha vó

110

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

Hoje é dia de Meter na secretaria na hora do almoço.. ..

193

 

Kleiton Barros

HÁ 3 DIAS

Bom msm é na hora do Expediente mesmo

102

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

ahahhahaahahahhhaaha

30

 

Rubens Silva

HÁ 3 DIAS

Vergonha!!!

120

 

Valter Soares

HÁ 3 DIAS

Quem sabe de todas as coisas, quem controla nosso universo, é somente DEUS.

323

 

Carlos Silva

HÁ 3 DIAS

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah essa é boa eu vou rir de novo!!!!

122

 

Ton Mota

HÁ 3 DIAS

Parece que o GDF não bastava ser mentiroso e agora apela para crença para enrolar a população.

121

 

Romerio Soares

HÁ 3 DIAS

Depois que começar a seca, pode chamar indi, pai de santo, pastor,padre etc, pois a questão da água era previsível, não fez nada, agora é começar cavar poço igual n inicio do DF.

90

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

Enquanto isso acabei de g o z a r dentro da minha vizinha que tem namorado

197

VER MAIS 2 COMENTÁRIOS

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

Governo incopetente….

90

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

hahahahahaaahhaahhah quando se pode inventar para desviar dinheiro ate danca da chuva tem…..

72

 

Kimmy

HÁ 3 DIAS

E rezar para São Pedro, ainda adianta?

21

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

hahahahahaaahhaahhah quando se pode inventar para desviar dinheiro ate danca da chuva tem…..

21

 

Saulo Weslei

HÁ 3 DIAS

Se preparem para as consequências de seus atos.

41

 

Marcelo Oliveira

HÁ 4 DIAS

Era só o que faltava. Tem que arrumar um enxada para esses a toas capinarem. Brincar com as coisas de Deus. Chama Elias que ele faz chover e descer fogo do céu. É muita falta do que fazer mesmo. Vai procurar uma lavagem de roupa.

545

 

Flavia Souza

HÁ 4 DIAS

Chama quem?

98

 

Alan Souza

HÁ 4 DIAS

Chama aí então, vamos ver se Elias faz chover ao menos um fósforo aceso…

613

 

Augusto

HÁ 4 DIAS

KKKK GDF contrata fundação Cacique. Mas o EnRollemberg disse que quem vai fumar todas para chover no DF é ele. Pois isto ele tem experiência deste o tempo de UNB. Ele disse que se precisar fuma até para chover no Nordeste todo.

142

 

Marcus Bessa

HÁ 3 DIAS

Vão fumar o cachimbo da paz kkkkkk

30

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

Hoje e dia de S E X O com a secretaria…

51

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

IPVA 2017…..

00

 

Ton

HÁ 4 DIAS

Era melhor o GDF pedir ajuda ao espírito do riquínho pra ver se entra dinheiro nos cofres do governo, não aguentamos mais ele usar a desculpa da lei de responsabilidade fiscal. Cuidado Rollemberg, pro caboclo porrete não descer no seu lombo seu incompetente. Falta de uma surra bem dada nesse charlatões

132

 

Gelson

HÁ 3 DIAS

Nao so nele tem tb o povinho da CLDF E DA CAMARA DOS DEPUTADOS CONGRESSO E BURITI

20

 

Edson Rocha

HÁ 4 DIAS

se isso funcionasse vc acha que o nordeste estaria nessa seca?????

471

VER MAIS 1 COMENTÁRIO

 

Leonardo Bezerra

HÁ 4 DIAS

Demônio é tu seu incauto!

513

 

Guilherme Trindade

HÁ 3 DIAS

pois é

00

 

Gabriel Rodrigues

HÁ 4 DIAS

Bobo e estrada ruim não acaba nunca!

40

 

Andre Olavo

HÁ 4 DIAS

SÓ FALTAVA ESSA, QUE DESGRAÇAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

123

 

Andre Olavo

HÁ 4 DIAS

ENFIA A COBRA CORAL NO R@BB, OOO DA TUA MAE ROLLEMBERGFDAPUTTAAAA

323

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Partiu fazer dança da chuva!!! Paga quanto Governo?

232

 

Alan Souza

HÁ 4 DIAS

Não leu que é gratuito?

36

 

Roberto

HÁ 4 DIAS

o irônico que volto a chovendo aqui em Brasilia !!

43

 

Leonardo Bezerra

HÁ 4 DIAS

ahahahhah tá de sacanagem! Se fosse assim eu chamaria os pajés lá da amazônia pra fazer chover! Daria mais certo. Esse Governo de Brasília em vez de trabalhar fica inventando moda!

141

 

Sergio Santos

HÁ 4 DIAS

KKKKKKKKKK, só pode ser piada!!1

120

 

Romeu Reis

HÁ 4 DIAS

O Brasil não é um país sério….

410

 

Geraldo Barros

HÁ 4 DIAS

muito sério, exceto seus governantes que está gastando os bilhões dos cofres públicos, (dinheiro do povo) com consultores de demônios, ‘para que haja chuva’? ehehhe! Só faltava essa …

54

 

Paulo

HÁ 4 DIAS

É piada né?! A saúde do DF esta uma porcaria e esse incompetente vai gastar dinheiro com empresa para ficar dançando; o Brasil é um país de tolos mesmo! O Povo tem que pagar mesmo para aprender. Vai abrir licitação ou vai ser feita de forma emergencial para poder dar mais dinheiro para ser ensacado nos bolsos??

22

 

Dorgival Reis

HÁ 4 DIAS

kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk. E mais, kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk…..

30

 

Nestor Ribeiro

HÁ 4 DIAS

Contrata também a Fundação Cacique Rala Bun da para “dança da chuva”

40

 

Joao Campos

HÁ 4 DIAS

Já já a PF DESENCADEIA A OPERAÇÃO COBRA CORAL OU COBRA NAJA OU SERA COBRA DE DUAS CABEÇAS OU SERA…… COBRA DO POVO QUE ELE PAGA .

120

 

Andre Olavo

HÁ 4 DIAS

AGORA É QUE VAI FALTAR ÁGUA MESMO

72

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Partiu fazer dança da chuva!!! Paga quanto Governo?

23

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Partiu fazer a dança da chuva!!! Governo ta pagando bem!

13

 

Kaio Santos

HÁ 4 DIAS

Somente, rir…nada mais!

402

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

72

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Fechem o INMET!!! Não precisamos dele mais!!! Se eu fizer a dança da chuva o governo me paga???

102

 

Cleison Santos

HÁ 4 DIAS

É muita gente falando água, deve ser essa que vai encher as represas.

30

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Fechar o INMET então! Não está servindo pra nada mais!!! !…

20

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Fechem o INMET então! Não está servindo pra nada mais!!! !…..

20

 

Hamitlon Júnior

HÁ 4 DIAS

Fechem o INMET então! Não está servindo pra nada mais!!! Que piada meu!

10

 

Joao Campos

HÁ 4 DIAS

Vai ter licitação ou vai ser dispensado por ser situaçao emergencial. llllll

170

 

Joe

HÁ 4 DIAS

Fake news? HAHAHAHA

00

 

Nei Isau

HÁ 4 DIAS

Isso é uma safadeza! O que não fizeram com ações, querem resolver com espiritualismo!

90

 

Rodrigo Nascimento

HÁ 4 DIAS

Só pode ser piada!

120

Brasília contrata Cacique Cobra Coral para conter crise no desabastecimento de água (O Globo)

POR CLEO GUIMARÃES

30/03/2017 07:45

Congresso Nacional em Brasília

Congresso Nacional em Brasília | Reprodução

Brasília também se rendeu ao Cacique Cobra Coral. Com risco real de desabastecimento de água na cidade, e às vésperas de sediar o Fórum Mundial da Água em 2018, o governo do Distrito Federal decidiu fechar parceria com a fundação esotérica que teria o poder de controlar o tempo. A parceria foi sugerida pelo governador do Rio, Luiz Fernando Pezão.

Segue a história

O governador do Distrito Federal, Rodrigo Rollemberg, já encaminhou a minuta do contrato para a CAESB (Companhia de Saneamento Ambiental do Distrito Federal), que ficará responsável pelo convênio com a entidade.

 

8 COMENTÁRIOS (em 3 de abril de 2017, às 15h57)

 

J Figueiredo

HÁ 4 DIAS

QUE PIADA MAIS SEM GRAÇA.

Marco Passos

HÁ 4 DIAS

Esses cars não ficam com medo nem em tempo de lava jato. Tomara que não demore muito a ser preso.

Marco Passos

HÁ 4 DIAS

É muita falta de vergonha.

Vitor Cunha

HÁ 4 DIAS

Certamente a família Maia está levando comissão!

Cristiano Lima

HÁ 4 DIAS

vocês desejam que volte a ter água em qualquer lugar do Brasil, então PLANTE MUITAS ARVORES E A NATUREZA VAI AGRADECER!

Pablo Arceles

HÁ 4 DIAS

Eles teriam o poder de controlar o clima não o tempo, nossa eu que sou burro faria umas reportagens melhores do que alguns jornalistas do Globo.

José Soares

HÁ 4 DIAS

Religião cada um tem a sua… Há quem não tem nenhuma. Outros tantos são agnósticos ou ateus. Não é brinquedo não, prefeitos do Rio César Maia e Paes, e o governador Pezão assinarem contrato com a Fundação Cobra Coral para prestar assistência espiritual a fim de tentar reduzir os estragos causados por temporais; a ONG é comandada por Adelaide Scritori, que afirma ter o poder de controlar o tempo. Dória outsider inteligente foi na onda; o governante da vez é de Brasília. E assim a médium vai faturando, às custas de contribuintes… Vixe!

Roldão Filho

HÁ 4 DIAS

Só falta contratar o Dr. Janot Pacheco para jogar sal nas nuvens para que chova.

Rollemberg diz manter ‘contato informal’ com Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (G1)

Governador do DF afirmou, em rede social, que relação não prevê contrato ou pagamento; entidade contesta. Fundação diz ter montado ‘QG’ no Entorno para estender temporada de chuvas.


 

Postagem do governador Rodrigo Rollemberg em rede social, com referência à Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (Foto: Facebook/Reprodução)

Postagem do governador Rodrigo Rollemberg em rede social, com referência à Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (Foto: Facebook/Reprodução) 

O governador do Distrito Federal, Rodrigo Rollemberg, afirmou nas redes sociais que tem “mantido contatos informais” com a Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral – entidade esotérica que teria o poder de controlar o clima –, em busca de soluções para a crise hídrica que atinge a capital. Segundo Rollemberg, as conversas não incluem contrato ou pagamento, mas “toda ajuda é bem-vinda”.

A publicação foi ao ar nesta sexta-feira (31). Na quinta (30), reportagem do G1 mostrou que a fundação tinha montado um “quartel-general” em Luziânia, no Entorno, para adiar a chegada da estiagem ao Planalto Central. A informação foi confirmada pelo porta-voz da entidade, Osmar Santos, mas, naquele momento, a Caesb e o Palácio do Buriti informavam “desconhecer” o convênio.

Na postagem, Rollemberg diz que, “como católico”, tem “rezado muito para que chova bastante no DF”. As atividades da Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral estão relacionadas a contatos com o plano astral e com o espírito do cacique que nomeia a entidade – e que já passou pela terra como Abraham Lincoln e Galileu Galilei, segundo o grupo.

Questionado pelo G1, Santos disse que a fundação se define como “entidade esotérica científica, ou espiritualista”. Segundo ele, toda operação tem apoio técnico de dois cientistas voluntários – um da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), e um do Centro de Previsões e Estudos Climáticos do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (CPTEC/Inpe).

Ao contrário do que afirma o governo, a Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral diz que um contrato será fechado, e terá de ser publicado em Diário Oficial. O acordo não prevê repasse de dinheiro público – as atividades são custeadas por empresários e mantenedores, afirma a entidade.

Fotografia de longa exposição de raios e tempestade no Distrito Federal (Foto: Felipe Bastos/Arquivo pessoal)

Fotografia de longa exposição de raios e tempestade no Distrito Federal (Foto: Felipe Bastos/Arquivo pessoal) 

Fé contra a crise

Segundo o porta-voz, a operação será similar à que foi empregada em São Paulo e no Rio de Janeiro, em 2015, para conter a crise hídrica que secou os reservatórios daquela região.

Em fevereiro, o blog “Gente Boa”, do jornal “O Globo”, informou que o prefeito João Doria tinha fechado nova parceria com a fundação. “Quem nos indicou para o governo de Brasília foi o governador [do Rio], Luiz Fernando Pezão, que tocava essa operação por lá”, diz Santos.

“Começamos há uns 20 dias. [A intervenção] Consiste em prolongar esse período chuvoso por mais uns dias, para tornar o outono e o inverno mais úmidos. Também queremos antecipar o período chuvoso já para setembro.”

Em anos “normais”, a temporada de chuvas no DF começa em meados de outubro, e se estende até o mês de março. Se o clamor ao cacique for atendido, as nuvens devem continuar sobre a capital federal por, pelo menos, mais dez dias.

“É um processo gradual, porque você não pode mexer com a natureza de qualquer jeito, causando efeito colateral. Mas vão ser as águas de abril, e não de março, que vão fechar o verão.”

Além do socorro às crises hídricas, a fundação já foi acionada pelos governos estaduais, pela União e até por outros países para garantir o céu limpo em grandes eventos – Rock in Rio, festas de réveillon e Olimpíadas, por exemplo.

37 COMENTÁRIOS (3 de abril de 2017, 13h57)

  • Lazaro Castro

    HÁ UM DIA

    honrar compromisso que é bom nada né governador lamentável

    130

    • Saulo Weslei

      HÁ 5 HORAS

      Quando um governo é extremamente incompetente recorre a estas coisas.

      40
    • José Rodrigues

      HÁ 2 HORAS

      kkkkkkkk……….é cada piada esse governo imprestável!!!!!

      20
  • Jose

    HÁ 15 HORAS

    Ma che bello administrador ! kkkk

    10
  • Bruno Silva
    HÁ 16 HORAS

    Por que nunca resolveram o problema do sertão nordestino? Precisava transpor o velho Chico com uma “solução” prática dessa?

    30
  • George Rocha

    HÁ 19 HORAS

    Só pode estar desdenhando!

    50

  • Ivam Silva

    HÁ 24 HORAS

    Me recuso a acreditar nessas asneiras. So mesmo nesse Brasilzinho.

    110

  • Laechelndfuchs

    HÁ UM DIA

    Os surdos correm grande risco de serem picados pela cobra coral…

    100

  • Carlos Leonel

    HÁ UM DIA

    kkkkkkkkk

    101
  • Cleanto Sena

    HÁ UM DIA

    ouvi dizer que a tal entidade vai também atuar na saúde ,segurança ,transporte, e economia do DF pois os últimos governantes não deram conta

    152

  • Marcio L.

    HÁ UM DIA

    sera que pra trazer chuva os caras vão fazer a dança da chuva kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

    171

  • Renato Abreu
    HÁ 2 DIAS

    Caique coral é uma entidade da bruxaria. Governador, não amaldiçoe ainda mais nossa terra. Vc não faz idéia do mal que vc está se fazendo e a toda população do DF. Vai procurar Deus, vai orar, pede a Jesus Cristo, pq ele sim é quem faz chover para pecadores e justos.

    7441

    • Galega

      HÁ UM DIA

      rindo até 2050 kkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

      263
    • Cesar Schmitt

      HÁ UM DIA

      Te informa direito, antes de dizer besteira,

      312
  • Ricardo Cardoso

    HÁ UM DIA

    Aqui a mallandragem não tem por onde.

    120
  • Milton Oliveira

    HÁ UM DIA

    Governador do DF Rodrigo Rollemberg … é um exemplo do baixo nível dos gestores do nosso dinheiro no Brasil …Energia esotérica contra a crise hídrica ??? Só para um incompetente sair com essa … Vamos varrer essa gente da vida pública

    314

  • Francisco Rocha

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    Parece piada do Sensacionalista.

    432

    • Leandro

      HÁ UM DIA

      pois é, por um momento até achei que tava no portal errado.

      121
  • Andre Ramos

    HÁ UM DIA

    Saravá!!

    74
  • Vicente

    HÁ UM DIA

    Agora, o Brasil inaugurará a CORRUPÇÃO espiritual !!

    173

  • Veterano

    HÁ UM DIA

    A primeira vez que ouvi sobre essa Fundação, faz anos… Foi notícias vindas do RJ, onde o Governo pagava para essa Fundação ajudar a NÃO chover no Réveillon. Demorei um bom tempo para acreditar no que lia, achei que tinha enlouquecido de vez.

    201

    • Veterano

      HÁ UM DIA

      A tal Fundação “trabalhou” no Rock in Rio?! De qual ano??? Em 2011 choveu tanto que pro Guns and Roses tocar tiveram antes que retirar muita água do palco com rodo.

      111
  • Andre Campos

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    Eu sinceramente estou a defecar e a andar para o fato do Rollemberg (e a globo) ter fé em qualquer coisa ou achar isso bonito. Eu quero é que ele cumpra as promessas de governo, que até agora não chegaram em nem 20% do prometido.

    215

    • Loucs Silva

      HÁ UM DIA

      Cara, não tem 5 meses de cargo…

      310
  • Michele Junior

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    No centro espirita, preciso de chuva no distrito federal, atençao caral musical do centro vamos la voce deve esta pensando, ela foi embora, mais ja deve esta voltando, nao demora, ou ela foi pra muito longe, felicidade, felicidade? erramos que maldade, onde esta que nao responde, pois minha ALMA geme por voce, geme geme u por voce geme geme ha, ha ha ha a chuva nao vai chegar

    15

  • Daniel Dutra
    HÁ 2 DIAS

    O que é “contato informal”?

    131

  • José Oliveira

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    É SÓ O QUE FALTAVA, ÍNDIO QUER DINHEIRO E O IDIOTA ACREDITA?

    211
  • Hamitlon Júnior

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    Me paga que eu faço a dança da chuva todo dia ao meio dia!

    300

    • Jane Lucas

      HÁ 2 DIAS

      kkkkkkkk

      80
  • Francisco Silva
    HÁ 2 DIAS

    Manda esta organização pro nordeste,se resolver o problema recebe, se não resolver ela paga o prejuiso.

    305

    • Jane Lucas

      HÁ 2 DIAS

      boa

      81
  • Edson Mendes

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    E muito obscurantismo em pleno século XXl

    282

  • Pedro Passos

    HÁ 2 DIAS

    Só o que faltava! Fala sério?

    281

Paying for pain: What motivates tough mudders and other weekend warriors? (Science Daily)

Date:
March 22, 2017
Source:
Journal of Consumer Research
Summary:
Why do people pay for experiences deliberately marketed as painful? According to a new study, consumers will pay big money for extraordinary — even painful — experiences to offset the physical malaise resulting from today’s sedentary lifestyles.

Why do people pay for experiences deliberately marketed as painful? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers will pay big money for extraordinary — even painful — experiences to offset the physical malaise resulting from today’s sedentary lifestyles.

“How do we explain that on the one hand consumers spend billions of dollars every year on analgesics and opioids, while exhausting and painful experiences such as obstacle races and ultra-marathons are gaining in popularity?” asked authors Rebecca Scott (Cardiff University), Julien Cayla (Nanyang Technological University), and Bernard Cova (KEDGE Business School).

Tough Mudder is a grueling adventure challenge involving about 25 military-style obstacles that participants — known as Mudders — must overcome in half a day. Among others, its events entail running through torrents of mud, plunging into freezing water, and crawling through 10,000 volts of electric wires. Injuries have included spinal damage, strokes, heart attacks, and even death.

Through extensive interviews with Mudders, the authors learned that pain helps individuals deal with the reduced physicality of office life. Through sensory intensification, pain brings the body into sharp focus, allowing participants who spend much of their time sitting in front of computers to rediscover their corporeality.

In addition, the authors write, pain facilitates escape and provides temporary relief from the burdens of self-awareness. Electric shocks and exposure to icy waters might be painful, but they also allow participants to escape the demands and anxieties of modern life.

“By leaving marks and wounds, painful experiences help us create the story of a fulfilled life spent exploring the limits of the body,” the authors conclude. “The proliferation of videos recording painful experiences such as Tough Mudder happens at least partly because a fulfilled life also means exploring the body in its various possibilities.”


Journal Reference:

  1. Rebecca Scott, Julien Cayla, Bernard Cova. Selling Pain to the Saturated SelfJournal of Consumer Research, 2017; DOI: 10.1093/jcr/ucw071

Gol pagará R$ 4 mi a índios pela queda do avião em 2006 (UOL)

09/11/201611h36

A Gol pagará indenização de R$ 4 milhões por danos ambientais, materiais e imateriais ao povo Mebengokre Kayapó, da Terra Indígena Capoto/Jarina, em Peixoto de Azevedo, a 629 quilômetros de Cuiabá, por causa da queda de um Boeing da companhia, em setembro de 2006, que deixou 154 mortos. Segundo as crenças e tradições do povo Kayapó, a área tornou-se uma “casa dos espíritos” após a tragédia.

O acordo foi fechado em 28 de outubro, intermediado pelo Ministério Público Federal, e veio a público ontem. O avião da Gol fazia a linha do voo 1907, entre Manaus e Rio, e caiu após se chocar com um jato Legacy que seguia para os Estados Unidos, com sete pessoas a bordo. Os pilotos e ocupantes do Legacy conseguiram pousar, sem sofrer maiores danos. Passageiros e tripulação da Gol morreram na queda do Boeing.

Após a tragédia, a área afetada pelo acidente tornou-se “imprópria para o uso da comunidade, por razões de ordem religiosa e cultural”. Segundo as crenças e tradições do povo Kayapó, passou a existir ali uma “casa dos espíritos”. “Naquele lugar nós não vamos caçar, não vamos fazer roça, não vamos pescar. Nós respeitamos os espíritos que moram lá”, explicou o cacique Bedjai Txucarramãe.

A Gol definiu que cabia aos índios discutirem a indenização pela terra perdida. “Para a sociedade branca ainda é difícil entender a vida religiosa e espiritual dos povos indígenas. A conclusão da empresa, após diversas reuniões, é que somente a própria etnia Kayapó poderia valorar os danos passados e futuros sofridos.

Entenda-se esse acordo como gesto de respeito para com a comunidade e a cultura do povo Kayapó, pelo qual a empresa, com absoluta boa-fé, busca realizar a reparação integral dos danos decorrentes do acidente aéreo”, ressaltou um representante da Gol.

Uso dos recursos

A proposta de indenização aceita pelos índios também recebeu aval do diretor de Promoção ao Desenvolvimento Sustentável da Fundação Nacional do Índio (Funai), Artur Nobre Mendes, durante a reunião do dia 28. O uso dos recursos será gerido pelo Instituto Raoni, que também deverá prestar contas à Procuradoria da República em Barra do Garças, comprovando que a quantia resultou em melhorias ou benefícios para o povo Mebengokre Kayapó.

O procurador da República Wilson Rocha Fernandes Assis, que atuou na intermediação da negociação, ressaltou no site oficial do MPF o protagonismo da comunidade indígena na celebração do acordo. Segundo ele, caberá ao MPF a elaboração de um laudo antropológico para esclarecer quais lideranças vão formalizar o acordo.

As informações são do jornal O Estado de S. Paulo.


09/07/2016 20h32 – Atualizado em 09/07/2016 20h32

Índios kayapós querem indenização por queda de avião da Gol em MT (G1)

Índios alegam que local virou ‘casa de espíritos’ e vedado ao uso da tribo.
Avião da Gol caiu na terra indígena Capoto-Jarina em setembro de 2006

Lislaine dos Anjos, Do G1 MT

Como duas pesquisadoras estão derrubando clichês sobre a política no Brasil (BBC)

6 junho 2016

ciencia politica

Nara Pavão e Natália Bueno: pesquisadoras questionam chavões da política no Brasil 

O brasileiro é racista e privilegia candidatos brancos ao votar. Políticos corruptos se mantêm no poder porque o eleitor é ignorante. Quem recebe Bolsa Família é conivente com o governo. ONGs são um ralo de dinheiro público no Brasil. Será?

A julgar pelos estudos de duas jovens pesquisadoras brasileiras em ciência política, não.

Natália Bueno e Nara Pavão, ambas de 32 anos, se destacam no meio acadêmico no exterior com pesquisas robustas que desmistificam chavões da política brasileira que alimentam debates em redes sociais e discussões de botequim.

Natural de Belo Horizonte (MG), Natália faz doutorado em Yale (EUA), uma das principais universidades do mundo. Em pouco mais de oito anos de carreira, acumula 13 distinções acadêmicas, entre prêmios e bolsas.

A pernambucana Nara é pesquisadora de pós-doutorado na Universidade Vanderbilt (EUA). Soma um doutorado (Notre Dame, EUA), dois mestrados em ciência política (Notre Dame e USP), 16 distinções.

Em comum, além da amizade e da paixão pela ciência política, está o interesse das duas em passar a limpo “verdades absolutas” sobre corrupção, comportamento do eleitor e políticas públicas no Brasil.

Eleitor é racista?

O Brasil é um país de desigualdades raciais – no mercado de trabalho, no acesso à educação e à saúde. Atraída pelo tema desde a graduação, Natália Bueno verificou se isso ocorre também na representação política.

O primeiro passo foi confirmar o que o senso comum já sugeria: há, proporcionalmente, mais brancos eleitos do que na população, e os negros são subrepresentados. Por exemplo, embora 45% da população brasileira (segundo o IBGE) se declare branca, na Câmara dos Deputados esse índice é de 80%.

E como a diferença foi mínima na comparação entre população e o grupo dos candidatos que não se elegeram, a conclusão mais rasteira seria: o brasileiro é racista e privilegia brancos ao votar.

politica

Abertura dos trabalhos no Congresso em 2016; pesquisa investigou desigualdade racial na política nacional. FABIO POZZEBOM/AGÊNCIA BRASIL

Para tentar verificar essa questão de forma científica, Natália montou um megaexperimento em parceria com Thad Dunning, da Universidade da Califórnia (Berkeley). Selecionou oito atores (quatro brancos e quatro negros), que gravaram um trecho semelhante ao horário eleitoral. Expôs 1.200 pessoas a essas mensagens, que só variavam no quesito raça.

Resultado: candidatos brancos não tiveram melhor avaliação nem respondentes privilegiaram concorrentes da própria raça nas escolhas.

Mas se a discrepância entre população e eleitos é real, onde está a resposta? No dinheiro, concluiu Natália – ela descobriu que candidatos brancos são mais ricos e recebem fatia maior da verba pública distribuída por partidos e também das doações privadas.

A diferença média de patrimônio entre políticos brancos (em nível federal, estadual e local) e não brancos foi de R$ 690 mil. E em outra prova do poder do bolso nas urnas, vencedores registraram R$ 650 mil a mais em patrimônio pessoal do que os perdedores.

Políticos brancos também receberam, em média, R$ 369 mil a mais em contribuições de campanha do que não brancos. A análise incluiu dados das eleições de 2008, 2010 e 2014.

“Se a discriminação tem um papel (na desigualdade racial na representação política), ela passa principalmente pelas inequidades de renda e riqueza entre brancos e negros que afetam a habilidade dos candidatos negros de financiar suas campanhas”, diz.

Corruptos estão no poder por que o eleitor é ignorante?

A corrupção é um tema central no debate político atual no Brasil. E se tantos brasileiros percebem a corrupção como problema (98% da população pensa assim, segundo pesquisa de 2014), porque tantos políticos corruptos continuam no poder?

A partir de dados de diferentes pesquisas de opinião – entre elas, dois levantamentos nacionais, com 2 mil e 1,5 mil entrevistados -, a recifense Nara Pavão foi buscar respostas para além do que a ciência política já discutiu sobre o tema.

politica

Ato contra corrupção no Congresso em 2011; estudo investiga por que corruptos se mantêm no poder. ANTONIO CRUZ/ABR

Muitos estudos já mostraram que a falta de informação política é comum entre a população, e que o eleitor costuma fazer uma troca: ignora a corrupção quando, por exemplo, a economia vai bem.

“Mas para mim a questão não é apenas se o eleitor possui ou não informação sobre políticos corruptos, mas, sim, o que ele vai decidir fazer com essa informação e como essa informação vai afetar a decisão do voto”, afirma a cientista política.

A pesquisa de Nara identificou um fator chave a perpetuar corruptos no poder: o chamado cinismo político – quando a corrupção é recorrente, ela passa ser vista pelo eleitor como um fator constante, e se torna inútil como critério de diferenciação entre candidatos.

Consequência: o principal fator que torna os eleitores brasileiros tolerantes à corrupção é a crença de que a corrupção é generalizada.

“Se você acha que todos os políticos são incapazes de lidar com a corrupção, a corrupção se torna um elemento vazio para você na escolha do voto”, afirma Nara, para quem o Brasil está preso numa espécie de armadilha da corrupção: quão maior é a percepção do problema, menos as eleições servem para resolvê-lo.

Quem recebe Bolsa Família não critica o governo?

O programa Bolsa Família beneficia quase 50 milhões de pessoas e é uma das principais bandeiras das gestões do PT no Planalto. Até por isso, sempre foi vitrine – e também vidraça – do petismo.

Uma das críticas recorrentes pressupõe que o programa, para usar a linguagem da economia política, altera os incentivos que eleitores têm para criticar o governo.

Famílias beneficiadas não se preocupariam, por exemplo, em punir um mau desempenho econômico ou a corrupção, importando-se apenas com o auxílio no começo do mês.

politica

Material de campanha em dia de votação em São Paulo em 2012; receber benefícios do governo não implica em conivência com Poder Público, conclui estudo. MARCELO CAMARGO/ABR

Deste modo, governos que mantivessem programas massivos de transferência de renda estariam blindados contra eventuais performances medíocres. Seria, nesse sentido, um arranjo clientelista – troca de bens (dinheiro ou outra coisa) por voto.

Um estudo de Nara analisou dados do Brasil e de 15 países da América Latina que possuem programas como o Bolsa Família e não encontrou provas de que isso seja verdade.

“Em geral, o peso eleitoral atribuído à performance econômica e à corrupção do governo é relativamente igual entre aqueles que recebem transferências de renda e aqueles que não recebem”, afirma.

A conclusão é que, embora esses programas proporcionem retornos eleitorais para os governantes de plantão, eles não representam – desde que sigam regras rígidas – incentivo para eleitores ignorarem aspectos ddo desempenho do governo.

ONGs são ralo de dinheiro público?

Organizações de sociedade civil funcionam como um importante instrumento para o Estado fornecer, por meio de parcerias e convênios, serviços à população.

Diferentes governos (federal, estaduais e municipais) transferem recursos a essas entidades para executar programas diversos, de construção de cisternas e atividades culturais.

Apenas em nível federal, essas transferências quase dobraram no período 1999-2010: de RS$ 2,2 bilhões para R$ 4,1 bilhões.

ONGs

Cisterna em Quixadá (CE), em serviço que costuma ser delegado a organizações civis; pesquisadora estudou distribuição de recursos públicos para essas entidades. FERNANDO FRAZÃO/ABR

Esse protagonismo enseja questionamentos sobre a integridade dessas parcerias – não seriam apenas um meio de canalizar dinheiro público para as mãos de ONGs simpáticas aos governos de plantão?

Com o papel dessas organizações entre seus principais de interesses de pesquisa, Natália Bueno mergulhou no tema. Unindo métodos quantitativos e qualitativos, analisou extensas bases de dados, visitou organizações e construiu modelos estatísticos.

Concluiu que o governo federal (ao menos no período analisado, de 2003 a 2011) faz, sim, uma distribuição estratégica desses recursos, de olho na disputa política.

“A pesquisa sugere que governos transferem recursos para entidades para evitar que prefeitos de oposição tenham acesso a repasses de recursos federais. Outros fatores, como implementação de políticas públicas para as quais as organizações tem expertise e capacidade únicas, também tem um papel importante.”

Ela não encontrou provas, porém, de eventual corrupção ou clientelismo por trás desses critérios de escolha – o uso das ONGs seria principalmente parte de uma estratégia político-eleitoral, e não um meio de enriquecimento ilícito.

“Esse tipo de distribuição estratégica de recursos é próprio da política e encontramos padrões de distribuição semelhantes em outros países, como EUA, Argentina e México”, diz Natália.

Corrupção é difícil de verificar, mas a pesquisadora usou a seguinte estratégia: comparou ONGs presentes em cidades com disputas eleitorais apertadas, checou a proporção delas no cadastro de entidades impedidas de fechar parcerias com a União e fez uma busca sistemática por notícias e denúncias públicas de corrupção.

De 281 ONGs analisadas, 10% estavam no cadastro de impedidas, e apenas uma por suspeita de corrupção.

El maldito (Brecha, UY)

Virginia Martínez

Montevideo 10 Marzo, 2017

Cultura, Destacados
Edición 1633 http://brecha.com.uy/el-maldito/; Acesado 13 Marzo 2017

Hijo intelectual y dilecto de Freud, luego disidente expulsado del círculo íntimo del maestro, Wilhelm Reich fue, para muchos, un psicoanalista maldito. Pionero de las terapias corporales, revolucionó la sexología con la teoría sobre la función del orgasmo. Desprestigiado y prohibido, murió en una cárcel de Estados Unidos a donde había llegado huyendo del nazismo para continuar sus investigaciones sobre la energía vital, que él llamaba orgón.

18-Reich-y-Neill-foto-captura-googleWilhelm Reich y Alexander S Neill / Foto: captura Google

Wilhelm Reich nació en una familia judía y acomodada que vivía en una zona rural de la actual Ucrania, por entonces parte del imperio austrohúngaro. El padre le puso el nombre en homenaje al emperador de Alemania, pero la madre prefería llamarlo Willi, quizá para protegerlo de la cólera de ese hombre celoso y autoritario que tenía por marido. Próspero criador de ovejas, León Reich trataba mal a todo el mundo, fuera familia, empleados o vecinos. El niño creció aguantando en silencio las penitencias y las bofetadas del padre. Solitario por obligación, aprendió en casa y de los padres las primeras letras hasta que León contrató a un preceptor.

Una tarde el pequeño Willi descubrió que el preceptor era también el amante de su madre. Aunque lo devoraban los celos, se cuidó de no contarle nada al señor Reich. Después de todo, la madre era el único refugio en el mundo sombrío y hostil de la casa familiar. Hasta que para vengarse de ella por una tontería, la traicionó denunciando la infidelidad. Sobrevino la catástrofe. Reproches, golpes y gritos. La mujer intentó suicidarse con veneno pero el marido la salvó sólo para seguir atormentándola. Willi terminó pupilo en una pensión de familia, y tuvieron que internarlo para tratarlo por una soriasis severa. Determinada a poner fin a una vida de reclusión y violencia, la madre logró irse para siempre en el tercer intento. Durante mucho tiempo el sentimiento de culpa atormentará al muchacho de 14 años que tres años más tarde perderá también al padre.

Socorro obrero. Luego de la Primera Guerra Mundial Reich empezó a estudiar medicina, se interesó en el psicoanálisis y se convirtió en uno de los discípulos más apreciados de Freud, quien le derivó a sus primeros pacientes. Unos años después el maestro ya se refería a él como “la mejor cabeza” de la Asociación Psicoanalítica de Viena. En 1921 llegó a la consulta una hermosa muchacha, con quien se casó al terminar el tratamiento (“Un hombre joven, de menos de 30 años, no debería tratar pacientes del sexo opuesto”, escribió en su diario). Por esa época profundizó el estudio de la sexualidad (“he llegado a la conclusión de que la sexualidad es el centro en torno al que gravita toda la vida social, tanto como la vida interior del individuo”) y siguió devoto a su mentor.

En ocasión de la fiesta de los 70 años de Freud le ofreció como regalo La función del orgasmo. Mucho más tarde de lo que esperaba recibió una respuesta lacónica del maestro. Fue el primer signo de que las cosas con él no iban bien. Diferencias teóricas (la teoría de Reich sobre el origen sexual de la neurosis) y políticas (su acercamiento a la cuestión social y al marxismo) hicieron el resto.

El 15 de julio de 1927 Reich y Annie, su mujer, presenciaron la represión de una manifestación de trabajadores que dejó cien muertos y más de mil heridos. La conciencia social de Reich había comenzado a forjarse como médico en el hospital público, pero la brutalidad de la actuación policial lo decidió a tomar partido. Se afilió al Socorro Obrero, organización del Partido Comunista austríaco, y comenzó a trabajar la idea de que marxismo y psicoanálisis eran complementarios (“Marx es a la ciencia económica lo que Freud a la psiquiatría”). Empezó a hablar en actos callejeros, repartía volantes, enfrentaba a la policía. Hizo amistad con un tornero, un muchacho más joven que él llamado Zadniker, de quien aprenderá tanto o más que en la universidad. Con Zadniker se asomó a la miseria sexual y las relaciones amorosas en la clase obrera, y conoció el efecto devastador de la desocupación en las relaciones familiares. Compró un camión y lo equipó como una policlínica ambulante, y dedicó los fines de semana a recorrer los barrios pobres de la ciudad junto a un pediatra y un ginecólogo: atendían niños, mujeres, jóvenes y daban clases de educación sexual.

Nada podía ser más ajeno a Freud que la militancia política de Reich. Le advirtió que estaba metiéndose en un avispero y que la función del psicoanalista no era cambiar el mundo. Pero él ya estaba lejos del maestro, viviendo en Berlín, preparándose para publicar el ensayo “Materialismo dialéctico y psicoanálisis” y viajar a la Urss.

Sexualidad proletaria. Aunque en Moscú no encontró un ambiente favorable a las teorías psicoanalíticas, regresó convencido de que la explotación capitalista y la represión sexual eran complementarias. En 1931 fundó la Asociación para una Política Sexual Proletaria. La “Sexpol”, como se la conoció, llegó a reunir a 40 mil miembros en torno a un programa que casi un siglo después mantiene vigencia: legalización del aborto, abolición del adulterio, de la prostitución, de la distinción entre casados y concubinos, pedagogía y libertad sexual, protección de los menores y educación para la vida. Para editar y difundir materiales de educación creó su propia editorial. Cuando tu hijo te pregunta y La lucha sexual de los jóvenes fueron dos de los folletos más exitosos en los que explicaba en lenguaje llano y sin prejuicios los tabúes de la vida sexual: orgasmo, aborto, masturbación, eyaculación precoz, homosexualidad.

El primer día de enero de 1932, a renglón seguido de un comentario sobre el agravamiento de la gastritis que padecía, Freud anotó en su diario: “Medidas contra Reich”. Entendía que su afiliación al partido bolchevique le restaba independencia científica y lo colocaba en una situación equivalente a la de un miembro de la Compañía de Jesús.

Dos días después del incendio del Reichstag, el diario oficial del Partido Nacional Socialista publicó una crítica contra La lucha sexual de los jóvenes. La prédica libertaria también le valió la reprobación de su partido, pues los comunistas temían que el interés por las cuestiones del sexo debilitara el compromiso político de sus militantes. Primero retiraron sus publicaciones y luego lo expulsaron del partido. Poco después la Gestapo lo fue a buscar a su casa.

Psicología de masas del fascismo. La primera escala del exilio que terminaría en Estados Unidos lo llevó a Copenhague, luego a Malmö, en Suecia, y más tarde a Oslo. Publicó La psicología de masas del fascismo, una obra que le dio celebridad, en la que analizaba la relación entre la familia autoritaria, la represión sexual y el nacionalsocialismo. La comunidad psicoanalítica lo excluyó, y empezó a circular el rumor de que estaba loco. A propósito escribió: “Los dictadores directamente expulsan o matan. Los dictadores democráticos asesinan furtivamente con menos coraje y sin asumir la responsabilidad de sus actos”.

En ese período se dedicó a estudiar la naturaleza bioeléctrica de la angustia y del placer. Volvió al laboratorio y al microscopio. A fines de mayo de 1935 escribió en una entrada de su diario: “Éxito total de la experimentación. La naturaleza eléctrica de la sexualidad está probada”. A principios del año siguiente fundó el Instituto Internacional de Economía Sexual para las Investigaciones sobre la Vida, donde reunió a un equipo multidisciplinario de médicos, psicólogos, pedagogos, artistas, sociólogos y laboratoristas. Ese año también conoció al pedagogo inglés Alexander S Neill, fundador de la escuela de Summerhill, con quien forjó una larga amistad personal e intelectual. Reich se interesaba en su pedagogía y él en los estudios sobre la psicología de masas del fascismo. En esa época publicó el artículo “¿Qué es el caos sexual?”, que los estudiantes de Nanterre retomarán como programa político en mayo de 1968, divulgándolo en volantes.

Las investigaciones y el proselitismo en materia de libertad sexual complicaron su situación en Oslo. En 1938, a través del psiquiatra estadounidense Theodor P Wolfe, consiguió un contrato como profesor en la Nueva Escuela de Investigación Social, de la Universidad de Nueva York, que recibía universitarios europeos perseguidos. En agosto del año siguiente desembarcó en la ciudad donde ya vivían su ex mujer y las dos hijas.

19-Wilhelm-Reich-museum-foto-captura-googleMuseo Wilhelm Reich / Foto: captura Google

Acumuladores de orgón. Abandonó el psicoanálisis y se concentró en investigar la relación de la psiquis con el sistema nervioso y el cuerpo. Empezó a trabajar los conceptos de “coraza muscular” (agarrotamiento, tensión) que se correspondían con los de “coraza caracterial” (producto de la represión de los sentimientos). Introdujo prácticas de terapia corporal en la consulta (masajes, abrazos, respiración, estiramiento) para ayudar al paciente a liberarse. Decía que el cuerpo necesitaba contraerse y expandirse en movimientos equivalentes a los de una medusa, y que las corazas y bloqueos impedían el movimiento, originando enfermedades.

Postuló la existencia de una energía vital, el orgón, que determinaba el funcionamiento del cuerpo humano y también estaba presente en la atmósfera. Creó dos instrumentos: el orgonoscopio, dispositivo para medir la energía, y el acumulador de orgón, especie de caja de madera revestida interiormente por capas de metal y material orgánico para atraer y concentrar el orgón. Primero fueron pequeños acumuladores donde colocó ratones con cáncer. En 1940 creó el primer acumulador de tamaño humano, una caja con aspecto de armario en la que uno podía sentarse. Sostenía que en una sesión dentro del acumulador el paciente absorbía orgón del aire que respiraba dentro de él y que esto tenía un efecto beneficioso para el sistema nervioso, los tejidos y la sangre.

Sin apoyo de la comunidad científica, sus investigaciones empezaron a ser tildadas de delirios y él de charlatán. Buscó el respaldo de Einstein, a quien le presentó su trabajo y le ofreció un acumulador, que instaló en su casa. El científico desechó el resultado de sus experiencias y la relación terminó en disputa. Mientras tanto había comenzado a tratar de forma experimental a enfermos de cáncer con la convicción de que el acumulador podía mejorar su capacidad para combatir la enfermedad. Otros enfermos se sumaron voluntariamente al tratamiento. Reich constató notables mejoras en el estado general y un descenso en los dolores de los pacientes. En 1946 compró un terreno al borde del lago Mooselookmeguntic, un edén al norte del país, en el estado de Maine, en la frontera con Canadá. Un sitio de bosques y montañas donde el contacto con la naturaleza era intenso. Allí instaló su vivienda y el laboratorio, un conjunto de edificaciones que pronto los vecinos llamaron “La casa de Frankenstein”. En 1945 se casó con una colaboradora, Ilse Ollendorf, con quien vivía desde tiempo atrás. Un año antes había nacido su hijo Peter, y un año después obtuvo la ciudadanía estadounidense.

En la mira del FBI. Inventando amigos comunes y con el pretexto de que tenía un mensaje para darle, la periodista Mildred Edie Brady logró franquear los filtros que Ilse ponía para salvaguardar a Reich. La recibió, recorrieron juntos el laboratorio y le mostró sus acumuladores de orgón. En abril de 1947 Brady publicó un artículo en Harper’s Magazine titulado “El nuevo culto del sexo y la anarquía”, por el que se haría famosa. Un mes después retomó el tema en The New Republic con “El extraño caso de Wilhelm Reich”. Brady afirmó que la ciencia desaprobaba sus actividades y conclusiones, que tenía más pacientes de los que podía atender y una influencia “mística” y perjudicial en los jóvenes. Fue el inicio de una campaña de desprestigio a la que se sumaron otras publicaciones. La prensa convirtió a los acumuladores en “cajas de sexo” y a la terapia corporal en sesiones de masturbación a los pacientes. En agosto recibió la primera inspección de la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos (Fda).

En los años siguientes Reich continuó publicando (Escucha, pequeño hombrecito, 1948, El análisis del carácter, 1949) e investigando, en particular los efectos de las radiaciones nucleares y las posibilidades de neutralizarlas. Para ello colocó una muestra mínima de radio en un acumulador, pero el efecto provocado fue el contrario del que buscaba. El acumulador amplificó la radiactividad, con consecuencias negativas para él y sus colaboradores. Su hija Eva, médica e investigadora, sufrió una bradicardia severa. El resto del equipo volvió a mostrar los síntomas de enfermedades que habían padecido antes. Todos, incluido Reich, presentaron alteraciones emocionales. Poco después, Ilse decidió dejar la casa con el pequeño Peter.

Para limpiar el lugar de la energía tóxica, que llamó Dor (por deathorgone), creó el “Rompe nubes”, una máquina de seis tubos en línea apuntados al cielo. A partir de ella hizo, con éxito, experimentos para provocar lluvia en la región donde vivía, afectada por una larga sequía. Inagotable, pensó en probarla en el desierto y en adaptarla, reduciendo el tamaño, para extraer el Dor de un cuerpo humano enfermo.

Paranoico con delirios de grandeza. A pedido de la Fda, la justicia del Estado de Maine inició una acción contra Reich y su fundación. Le prohibieron trasladar acumuladores a otros estados y calificaron las investigaciones de expedientes publicitarios. Lo acusaron de charlatán y de obtener beneficio económico de la credulidad de los enfermos. El 19 de marzo de 1955 un juez ordenó retirar de circulación y destruir los acumuladores, quemar las publicaciones que hicieran referencia al orgón y, aunque sin relación con lo anterior, también prohibió las ediciones de La psicología de masas del fascismo y El análisis del carácter.

En octubre Reich viajó a Tucson, en Arizona, para, como informó a la justicia, estudiar la energía de orgon en la atmósfera en zonas desérticas. Luego de semanas de intenso trabajo en el desierto lograron hacer llover. Se proponía repetir el experimento en California, cuando el 1 de mayo de 1956 lo detuvieron.

El psiquiatra que lo examinó en la prisión dictaminó que no podía ser objeto de juicio pues se trataba de un enfermo mental: “Manifiesta paranoia con delirio de grandeza y de persecución e ideas de influencia”. La justicia, sin embargo, entendió que estaba en condiciones de ser juzgado. Lo condenaron a dos años de prisión y a pagar una multa de 10 mil dólares.

Dicen los testimonios que fue un preso ejemplar, que se adaptó bien a la disciplina de Lewisburg y que el único privilegio que reclamaba era bañarse con frecuencia para aliviar la soriasis que no lo abandonaba desde los tristes días de la infancia.

El 3 de noviembre de 1957 lo encontraron muerto en su celda. Dos días después iba a asistir a la audiencia donde el juez debía decidir sobre su pedido de libertad condicional. Reich dormía vestido, sin zapatos, sobre la cama tendida. Lo velaron en el observatorio de Orgonon, en Rangley, donde hoy está el museo que lleva su nombre.


Freud sí, Reich no

“Acá todos estamos dispuestos a asumir riesgos por el psicoanálisis, pero no ciertamente por las ideas de Reich, que nadie suscribe. Con relación a eso, he aquí lo que piensa mi padre: si el psicoanálisis debe ser prohibido, que lo sea por lo que es no por la mescolanza de política y psicoanálisis que hace Reich. Por otro lado, mi padre no se opondría a sacárselo de encima como miembro de la asociación.”

Carta de Anna Freud a Ernest Jones, presidente de la Asociación Internacional de Psicoanálisis y biógrafo de Freud. 27 de abril de 1933.

Deseo sexual versus autoritarismo

“La familia autoritaria no está fundada sólo en la dependencia económica de la mujer y los hijos con respecto al padre y marido, respectivamente. Para que unos seres en tal grado de servidumbre sufran esta dependencia es preciso no olvidar nada a fin de reprimir en ellos la conciencia de seres sexuales. De este modo, la mujer no debe aparecer como un ser sexual, sino solamente como un ser generador. La idealización de la maternidad, su culto exaltado, que configura las antípodas del tratamiento grosero que se inflige a las madres de las clases trabajadoras, está destinada, en lo esencial, a asfixiar en la mujer la conciencia sexual, a someterla a la represión sexual artificial, a mantenerla a sabiendas en un estado de angustia y culpabilidad sexual. Reconocer oficial y públicamente a la mujer su derecho a la sexualidad conduciría al hundimiento de todo el edificio de la ideología autoritaria.”

De La psicología de masas del fascismo.

¿Qué es el caos sexual?

Es apelar en el lecho conyugal a los deberes conyugales.

Es comprometerse en una relación sexual de por vida sin antes haber conocido sexualmente a la pareja.

Es acostarse con una muchacha obrera porque “ella no merece más”, y al mismo tiempo no exigirle “una cosa así” a una chica “respetable”.

Es hacer culminar el poderío viril en la desfloración.

Es castigar a los jóvenes por el delito de autosatisfacción y hacerles creer que la eyaculación les debilita la médula espinal.

Es tolerar la industria pornográfica.

Es soñar a los 14 años con la imagen de una mujer desnuda y a los 20 entrar en las listas de los que pregonan la pureza y el honor de la mujer.

¿Qué no es el caos sexual?

Es liberar a los niños y a los adolescentes del sentimiento de culpa sexual y permitirles vivir acorde a las aspiraciones de su edad.

Es no traer hijos al mundo sin haberlos deseado ni poderlos criar.

Es no matar a la pareja por celos.

Es no tener relaciones con prostitutas sino con amigas de tu entorno.

Es no verse obligado a hacer el amor a escondidas, en los corredores, como los adolescentes en nuestra sociedad hoy, cuando lo que uno quiere es hacerlo en una habitación limpia y sin que lo molesten.

Wilhelm Reich

Cacique de laptop cobra até US$ 10 mil para espantar chuva (Folha de S.Paulo)

Ilustrada. São Paulo, quarta-feira, 06 de outubro de 2010

DE SÃO PAULO

O índio citado pelo diretor artístico do SWU é uma das figuras mais bizarras do show business nacional. Segundo Roberto Medina, o empresário por trás do Rock in Rio, é o trabalho dele que tem segurado a água que invariavelmente jorra do céu toda vez que um festival de música acontece. Embora o assunto seja tratado com discrição, os eventos costumam reservar uma cifra para contratar os “serviços meteorológicos” da Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (www.fccc.org.br), uma entidade “científica esotérica especializada em fenômenos climáticos”.

Na prática, trata-se de uma dança da chuva ao contrário. O cacique, com métodos que não revela, garante manter as nuvens carregadas longe do local do show.
Medina conta que, no caso dele, o cacique nunca falhou – desde a primeira vez que foi contratado por sua empresa, a Artplan, na edição de 2001 do Rock in Rio.

Apesar da mítica deixada por Woodstock, onde a lama foi protagonista, Medina queria seu festival seco. Mas faltava uma semana para os shows e chovia torrencialmente. Foi quando uma assessora lhe falou do cacique “que fazia parar de chover”.

“Imaginei que chegaria uma pessoa com cocar, mas entrou um sujeito de terno, com laptop”, diz. “Ele pediu US$ 10 mil e eu negociei: “Te pago dois agora e, se não chover mesmo, te pago os oito no final”.”

O que mais o impressionou foi o fato de só não chover onde acontecia o festival. “Na outra esquina chovia sem parar, mas ali não caiu uma gota.”

Quando faz festivais fora do Brasil -como o Rock in Rio de Lisboa-, Medina carrega junto o cacique.

Procurada pela Folha, a Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral diz que tem como norma não identificar seus clientes e só dá entrevistas por e-mail.

“Nossa agência elabora boletins que sinalizam os melhores dias para os shows”, afirma Osmar Santos, da FCCC. “Tais boletins são elaborados por cientistas-meteorologistas, com base em modelos matemáticos e previsões numéricas.”

“Muita gente contrata [esse serviço]”, diz Pablo Fantoni, do Planeta Terra. “Eu não acredito. Se existe uma pessoa que tem poder sobre o tempo, seria um desperdício ele estar sendo usado em festivais de música e não para resolver a seca no Nordeste.”

(IVAN FINOTTI e MARCUS PRETO)

Hoje no Rock: Rock in Rio, 25 anos (Caio Mattos Experience)

Segunda-feira, 11 de janeiro de 2010

Hoje a primeira (e vamos combinar, a única) edição do Rock In Rio, completa 25 anos. Lembro bem da excitação da época e dos boatos, incluindo uma profecia de Nostradamus. O G1 preparou esta lista com 10 curiosidades bem legais. Taí pra voces!

No dia 11 de janeiro de 1985, os portões da Cidade do Rock se abriram para fazer história, inaugurando a era dos megafestivais de música pop no Brasil.

Há 25 anos, por dez dias, o Rock in Rio reuniu 29 artistas e 1,38 milhão de pessoas vibrando com o metal do Iron Maiden, se emocionando com James Taylor e quase nadando na lama nos dias mais chuvosos. As contas gastronômicas ajudam a dar a dimensão do evento – foram consumidos 1,2 milhão de sanduícules, 33 mil pizzas e 1,6 litros de cerveja, chope e refrigerante.

Além dos dados, nem todo mundo conhece outras histórias por trás do Rock in Rio, e o G1 selecionou alguns dos momentos mais curiosos do livro “Metendo o pé na lama”, escrito pelo diretor de arte Cid Castro, funcionário de Roberto Medina e criador da logomarca do festival. Confira abaixo dez curiosidades sobre o Rock in Rio I:

1 – Nostradamus x Bola – Circulavam boatos na época de que uma profecia de Nostradamus diria que um festival na América do Sul acabaria em tragédia. Para combater os rumores, a organização contratou um astrólogo, chamado Bola, para fazer o mapa astral do Rock in Rio. Ele disse que seria um festival tranquilo e acertou em cheio os resultados, até nos pontos baixos (falta de lucro e mau tempo).

2 – Era uma vez um pântano – A Cidade do Rock, arrendada em um campo ao lado do Autódromo de Jacarepaguá, levou três meses só para ter a base pronta. Em novembro de 1984, o pântano de 85 mil metros quadrados havia se transformado em uma área urbanizada com ruas, saneamento, área de lazer e heliporto. Foram necessários 55 mil caminhões de terra para adubar o aterro.

3 – Apostando tudo – Os potenciais patrocinadores do festival avisaram que só entrariam com o dinheiro depois que 50% das atrações internacionais estivessem confirmadas. Sem dinheiro para começar os trabalhos, Roberto Medina teve que dar o prédio de sete andares da agência Artplan como garantia para um empréstimo bancário.

4 – ‘Paitrocínio’ – O festival quase não aconteceu por falta de atrações. Apesar da experiência da Artplan, que já realizara shows de artistas como Barry White, Julio Iglesias e a apresentação lotada de Frank Sinatra no Maracanã com 160 ml pessoas, Roberto Medina passou 40 dias em Nova York correndo atrás de artistas, sem sucesso. Só depois da intervenção de seu pai Abraham Medina, preocupado com o sucesso da operação, é que as coisas começaram a andar – ele publicou matérias pagas em jornais estrangeiros e organizou um cocktail em Los Angeles, e então os contratos começaram a ser fechados.

5 – Jeitinho brasileiro – Para dar agilidade na troca de artistas do festival, que tinha apenas um palco, o cenógrafo Mário Monteiro criou uma estrutura móvel com três “palcos” distintos, correndo sobre trilhos – enquanto uma banda tocava, o equipamento da outra era preparado no tablado lateral.

6 – Saúde é o que interessa – Sem bebidas alcoólicas no camarim, os metaleiros do Whitesnake tinham direito a personal trianer e aquecimento com ginástica antes do show, correndo pela área de camarins. Completavam o time um nutricionista e um massagista.

7 – New wave – A baixista Tina Weymouth e o baterista Chris Frantz, casal que na época integrava o Talking Heads, tocaram como convidados especiais dos colegas da new wave norte-americana B-52s.

8 – Fazendo média – Matthias Jabs, guitarrista do Scorpions, tocou com uma guitarra com o corpo com o formato da América do Sul, inspirado no logo do festival. Para não fazer feio em cima do palco, a banda ainda contava com um coreógrafo, e cada pulo e giro de microfone era ensaiado.

9 – Sinos do inferno – O sino que o AC/DC tocava no início de “Hell’s bells” pesava 1.500 quilos, e teve que ser trazido de navio. Mas, na hora de subir no palco, não deu: a estrutura não aguentaria o peso. A solução foi uma réplica de gesso do sino, e a badalada foi disparada eletronicamente.

10 – Proibido comer morcegos – Com medo de que Ozzy Osbourne cometesse alguma loucura como comer morcegos no palco, a organização o proibiu contratualmente de abocanhar qualquer animal vivo durante o show. Para garantir que a cláusula fosse cumprida, membros da sociedade protetora dos animais fiscalizaram o show.

Postado por Caio Mattos às 02:54 Marcadores: Hoje no Rock, rock in rio

 

2 comentários:

(…)

Danfern disse…

Po, essa história da pajelança do Bola eu não sabia!
E eu achando que Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral era ‘privilégio’ dos nossos tempos…rs

New Research Shocks Scientists: Human Emotion Physically Shapes Reality! (IUV)

BY  /   SUNDAY, 12 MARCH 2017

published on Life Coach Code, on February 26, 2017

Three different studies, done by different teams of scientists proved something really extraordinary. But when a new research connected these 3 discoveries, something shocking was realized, something hiding in plain sight.

Human emotion literally shapes the world around us. Not just our perception of the world, but reality itself.

Emotions-Physically-Shape-Reality

In the first experiment, human DNA, isolated in a sealed container, was placed near a test subject. Scientists gave the donor emotional stimulus and fascinatingly enough, the emotions affected their DNA in the other room.

In the presence of negative emotions the DNA tightened. In the presence of positive emotions the coils of the DNA relaxed.

The scientists concluded that “Human emotion produces effects which defy conventional laws of physics.”

Emotions-Have-An-Effect-On-Reality

In the second, similar but unrelated experiment, different group of scientists extracted Leukocytes (white blood cells) from donors and placed into chambers so they could measure electrical changes.

In this experiment, the donor was placed in one room and subjected to “emotional stimulation” consisting of video clips, which generated different emotions in the donor.

The DNA was placed in a different room in the same building. Both the donor and his DNA were monitored and as the donor exhibited emotional peaks or valleys (measured by electrical responses), the DNA exhibited the IDENTICAL RESPONSES AT THE EXACT SAME TIME.

DNA-Responds-To-Our-Emotions

There was no lag time, no transmission time. The DNA peaks and valleys EXACTLY MATCHED the peaks and valleys of the donor in time.

The scientists wanted to see how far away they could separate the donor from his DNA and still get this effect. They stopped testing after they separated the DNA and the donor by 50 miles and STILL had the SAME result. No lag time; no transmission time.

The DNA and the donor had the same identical responses in time. The conclusion was that the donor and the DNA can communicate beyond space and time.

The third experiment proved something pretty shocking!

Scientists observed the effect of DNA on our physical world.

Light photons, which make up the world around us, were observed inside a vacuum. Their natural locations were completely random.

Human DNA was then inserted into the vacuum. Shockingly the photons were no longer acting random. They precisely followed the geometry of the DNA.

Light-Photons-Followed-The-Geometry-DNA

Scientists who were studying this, described the photons behaving “surprisingly and counter-intuitively”. They went on to say that “We are forced to accept the possibility of some new field of energy!”

They concluded that human DNA literally shape the behavior of light photons that make up the world around us!

So when a new research was done, and all of these 3 scientific claims were connected together, scientists were shocked.

They came to a stunning realization that if our emotions affect our DNA and our DNA shapes the world around us, than our emotions physically change the world around us.

Scientists-Make-A-Claim-That-Human-Emotion-Defy-The-Conventional-Laws-Of-Physics-And-Reality

And not just that, we are connected to our DNA beyond space and time.

We create our reality by choosing it with our feelings.

Science has already proven some pretty MINDBLOWING facts about The Universe we live in. All we have to do is connect the dots.

Sources:
– https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pq1q58wTolk;
– Science Alert;
– Heart Math;
– Above Top Secret;
– http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/mistic/esp_greggbraden_11.htm;

Governo de Brasília fecha parceria com fundação esotérica que “promete chuva” (O Globo)

Representante da Cacique Cobra Coral diz que ainda dá tempo

NONATO VIEGAS

17/03/2017 – 17h16 – Atualizado 17/03/2017 17h49

Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (Foto: reprodução)

Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (Foto: Reprodução)

Com risco real de desabastecimento de água em Brasília, o governo do Distrito Federal decidiu, finalmente, fechar parceria com a fundação esotérica que “promete chuva”, a Cacique Cobra Coral. A parceria fora sugerida pelo governador do Rio de Janeiro, Luiz Fernando Pezão (PMDB), mas o governador do Distrito Federal, Rodrigo Rollemberg (PSB), resistia. O acordo, sem ônus para o governo do Distrito Federal, será publicado nos próximos dias no Diário Oficial. Apesar da demora, o representante da entidade, Osmar Santos, diz que ainda dá tempo de ajudar os brasilienses.


Entidade esotérica critica governo do DF por atraso em obra que garantiria mais água

A Fundação Cobra Coral está preocupada porque a capital federal abrigará o Fórum Mundial da Água no ano que vem

NONATO VIEGAS

09/03/2017 – 11h14 – Atualizado 09/03/2017 11h26

Do jeito que está, diz Santos, corre o risco de Brasília passar vergonha no ano que vem, quando a cidade sediará o Fórum Mundial da Água, evento mais importante sobre o tema no cenário internacional.


Governador de Brasília abriu mão de entidade esotérica para pedir chuva

A Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral foi consultada e esquecida depois

MURILO RAMOS

05/03/2017 – 15h00 – Atualizado 06/03/2017 08h57

Ilustração indio (Foto:  Reprodução)

No fim de 2016, preocupado com o baixo nível dos reservatórios de água em Brasília, o governador do Distrito Federal, Rodrigo Rollemberg, buscou ajuda da Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral, entidade esotérica, para pedir chuva. Desde dezembro, no entanto, Rollemberg deixou a Cobral Coral de lado, e a questão hídrica em Brasília piorou. Mais de 20 regiões do Distrito Federal enfrentam racionamento de água. Apesar do abandono, o assessor da Cobra Coral, Osmar Santos, diz que ainda dá tempo de resolver o problema.

How the Amazon’s Cashews and Cacao Point to Cultivation by the Ancients (New York Times)

Scientists studying the Amazon rain forest are tangled in a debate of nature versus nurture.

Many ecologists tend to think that before Europeans arrived in the Americas, the vast wilderness was pristine and untouched by humans. But several archaeologists argue that ancient civilizations once thrived in its thickets and played a role in its development.

Now, researchers have found evidence that indigenous people may have domesticated and cultivated Amazonian plants and trees thousands of years ago, further supporting the idea that ancient humans helped shape the forest.

“Large areas of the Amazon are less pristine than we may think,” said Hans ter Steege, a tropical ecologist at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands, and an author of a paper published in Science on Thursday. “The people who lived there before Columbus left serious footprints that still persist in the composition as we see today.”

He was one of more than a hundred researchers who found that domesticated tree and palm species — like cacao, cashews, the açaí palm, the Brazil nut and rubber — were five times more likely to dominate the modern Amazonian forest than nondomesticated plants.

Carolina Levis, a doctoral student at the National Institute for Amazonian Research in Brazil and Wageningen University and Research Center in the Netherlands, was the lead author on the study. She and her team looked at a database from the Amazon Tree Diversity Network containing 1,170 plots of forest. Most plots measured approximately 2.5 acres each and had previously been investigated on foot by ecologists who counted and identified the plant species in the plots. Ms. Levis then identified 85 domestic plants to analyze.

One way the team determined that a plant had been domesticated was a look at its fruit. They found, for example, some peach palms that bore fruit weighing 200 grams, or 0.44 pounds, when the fruit grown in the wild matured to about one gram. Several of the domesticated plants they identified are still grown by South Americans.

The harvesting of peach palm in the Amazon. Credit: Tinde van Andel 

Ms. Levis compared her list of 85 plants to another database of more than 3,000 archaeological sites, including ceramics, dirt mounds and rock paintings, dating back before the Spaniards and Portuguese arrived in the Americas 500 years ago. The domesticated plants flourished near the archaeological sites, far more so than nondomesticated ones.

“It’s the first time that we show these correlations between plant species in the forest today and archaeological finds,” she said.

The findings suggest that either the ancient civilizations grew and cultivated the plants, or that they purposely settled in areas that had plants they could eat and use. Ms. Levis said she suspected that people were domesticating the plants, although the study did not definitively pinpoint how settlements were chosen. In some plots, more than half of the plant life consisted of domesticated trees and palms.

Jennifer Watling, an archaeologist at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, who was not involved with the study, said in an email that “the large number of data points sampled by these authors gives good reason to believe that the distribution of domesticated species in many areas of Amazonia is strongly linked to the actions of pre-Columbian societies.”

But Crystal McMichael, a paleoecologist from the University of Amsterdam, said the database comparisons were not convincing. New direct evidence, like fossils of domesticated plants at the archaeological sites, would help advance such theories, she said. While the study shows a potential association between ancient people and modern forest composition, it does not preclude the possibility that the domesticated plant patterns occurred with more modern settlements, she said in an email.

Dr. ter Steege disagreed. The study “changed my view of the forest,” he said. “It’s not only the ecology or the environment that created this forest, but also the people who lived there before.”

O peso através das gerações (Pesquisa Fapesp)

Entre ratos, efeitos do consumo excessivo ou da falta de comida podem ser transmitidos para filhos e netos 

REINALDO JOSÉ LOPES | ED. 252 | FEVEREIRO 2017

Experimentos com ratos feitos por pesquisadores de universidades de São Paulo reforçam a ideia de que o excesso de peso pode ser um fenômeno que transcende gerações – e não apenas porque os filhos tendem a herdar dos pais genes que favorecem o acúmulo de energia e os tornam predispostos à obesidade ou porque vivem em um ambiente com disponibilidade excessiva de comida. Alterações na oferta de alimento para as fêmeas um pouco antes ou durante a gravidez parecem aumentar, por mecanismos ainda pouco compreendidos, a probabilidade de que tenham filhos e até netos com sobrepeso.

Em uma série de testes, a bióloga Maria Martha Bernardi e sua equipe na Universidade Paulista (Unip) alimentaram algumas ratas no início da vida reprodutiva e outras já grávidas com uma dieta bastante calórica e aguardaram para ver o que acontecia com a primeira geração de filhotes e também com os filhos desses filhotes. Tanto os roedores que nasceram de mães superalimentadas quanto os da geração seguinte apresentaram mais predisposição a desenvolver sobrepeso.

A tendência de ganho excessivo de peso ocorreu mesmo quando os filhos e os netos dessas ratas foram alimentados apenas com a dieta padrão de laboratório. Segundo Martha, esses resultados indicam que o período em que o feto está se desenvolvendo no útero é crucial para definir a regulação do metabolismo do animal e, ao menos, o da geração seguinte.

Se essas mudanças aparecessem apenas na primeira geração, o mais natural seria imaginar que alterações hormonais provocadas pela dieta materna teriam afetado os filhotes. Como o efeito avança até a segunda geração, os pesquisadores suspeitam que a propensão a ganhar peso seja mantida por mecanismos epigenéticos: alterações no padrão de ativação e desligamento dos genes provocadas por fatores ambientais, como a dieta, e transmitidas às gerações seguintes. Essas mudanças no perfil de acionamento dos genes não alteram diretamente a sequência de “letras químicas” do DNA, apesar de serem herdadas através das gerações. Embora o grupo de Martha não tenha analisado o padrão de atividade dos genes, dados obtidos por cientistas mundo afora indicam que mudanças no perfil de ativação gênica sem alteração na sequência de DNA podem acontecer tanto em animais quanto em seres humanos.

Dieta que engorda
Curiosamente, não foi só a superalimentação materna durante a gestação que parece ter mexido com o perfil de ativação de seus genes e deixado filhos e netos com tendência a engordar. Em um dos experimentos, realizado em parceria com pesquisadores das universidades de São Paulo (USP), Federal do ABC (UFABC) e Santo Amaro (Unisa), 12 fêmeas de ratos receberam 40% menos comida do que o considerado normal para as roedoras prenhes, enquanto oito ratas do grupo de controle foram alimentadas com a dieta habitual de laboratório.

As fêmeas que passaram fome durante a gestação ganharam menos da metade do peso das ratas que puderam comer à vontade. Os filhotes das mães submetidas à restrição alimentar nasceram menores e continuaram mais magros durante algum tempo, ainda que recebessem a mesma quantidade de comida que os filhos das ratas que não passaram fome. Só na idade adulta a diferença desapareceu e os dois grupos de roedores alcançaram peso semelhante, embora os filhos das ratas famintas apresentassem uma proporção maior de gordura corporal – em especial, de uma forma de gordura que se acumula entre os órgãos (gordura visceral), associada a maior risco de problemas cardiovasculares.

A diferença mais importante surgiu na segunda geração. Os netos de ratas que haviam comido pouco enquanto estavam prenhes nasceram menores, mas, depois de adultos, eram um pouco (de 10% a 15%) mais pesados que os netos das ratas alimentadas normalmente. Eles tinham mais gordura visceral e também sinais de inflamação no cérebro. Esse ganho extra de peso ocorreu mesmo com as fêmeas da primeira geração, portanto, mães desses animais, tendo sido alimentadas normalmente. É como se a privação de alimento experimentada pelas ratas da geração inicial provocasse uma reprogramação metabólica duradoura em seus descendentes, afirmam os pesquisadores em artigo publicado em maio de 2016 na revista Reproduction, Fertility and Development.

O trabalho da equipe paulista, nesse ponto, confirma pesquisas anteriores que já haviam encontrado uma associação entre episódios de fome na gravidez e o nascimento de filhos com propensão ao aumento de peso e aos problemas de saúde a ele associados. Embora não tenham identificado o mecanismo específico por trás desse efeito, Martha Bernardi e sua equipe suspeitam que compostos produzidos pelo organismo das mães da geração inicial, parcialmente privadas de comida na gestação, ativem genes que favorecem o rápido ganho de peso no filhote. Assim, os sinais químicos emitidos pelo corpo materno funcionariam como um alerta de que o ambiente é de escassez e que é preciso usar com máxima eficiência os recursos alimentares disponíveis. Essa sinalização recebida pelo organismo do filhote poderia fazer toda a diferença, representando a chance de crescer e sobreviver em um ambiente com privação de alimento. “Mas também pode levar à obesidade, caso a oferta de alimentos volte a se normalizar depois que ele nasce”, explica Martha.

Estudos realizados nas décadas anteriores mostraram uma situação muito parecida com a descrita acima entre os descendentes das mulheres que ficaram grávidas durante o chamado Hongerwinter (inverno da fome, em holandês), quando os exércitos nazistas que recuavam na Holanda diante do avanço dos Aliados cortaram boa parte do transporte de suprimentos para o país entre o fim de 1944 e o começo de 1945, no final da Segunda Grande Guerra. Tanto os filhos quanto os netos das sobreviventes do Hongerwinter apresentavam taxas de obesidade e problemas metabólicos acima do esperado para a população geral.

Inflamação no cérebro
Em outro estudo, Martha e seus colegas forneceram alimentação hipercalórica – uma mistura de ração padrão mais um suplemento líquido rico em diferentes tipos de gordura – para 10 ratas logo após o desmame, enquanto outro grupo de fêmeas recebeu a alimentação normal e serviu de controle. Conforme o esperado, as ratas submetidas à dieta hipercalórica quando bebês ficaram acima do peso, ainda que não obesas, ao chegar à puberdade. Efeitos semelhantes foram observados em suas filhas: eram ratas que, quando adultas, apresentaram sobrepeso e alterações metabólicas, como o acúmulo de gordura visceral, embora tenham sido tratadas apenas com uma dieta balanceada durante toda a vida. Também publicado na Reproduction, Fertility and Development, esse trabalho e outros estudos do grupo indicam que o sobrepeso foi o desencadeador de processos inflamatórios que afetaram o cérebro da mãe e da prole, de forma aparentemente duradoura.

Se parece estranho imaginar que o excesso de peso pode levar a uma inflamação cerebral, é preciso lembrar que as células de gordura não são meros depósitos de calorias. Os adipócitos, como são chamados, produzem uma grande variedade de substâncias, entre as quais moléculas desencadeadoras de inflamações, que chegam à corrente sanguínea e, a partir dela, ao hipotálamo, região do cérebro associada, entre outras funções, ao controle da fome.

Trabalhos do grupo da Unip ainda não publicados indicam ainda que essa inflamação pode atingir outras áreas cerebrais dos roedores. A hipótese dos pesquisadores é de que o processo inflamatório no órgão esteja ligado à reprogramação do organismo transmitida da mãe para os filhotes, incluindo aí alterações no controle do apetite que podem se manter durante a vida adulta.

Para Alicia Kowaltowski, pesquisadora do Instituto de Química da USP que estuda a relação entre a dieta e os mecanismos de produção de energia das células, é bastante forte a possibilidade de que a tendência ao sobrepeso e à obesidade seja passada de uma geração para outra por meios que não envolvem a herança de genes favorecedores do ganho de peso. “A questão é saber quais são os mecanismos que estão por trás desses fenômenos”, conta a pesquisadora.

Entre tais mecanismos, um candidato que tem ganhado força são as transformações epigenéticas. O prefixo grego epi significa superior, e na palavra epigenética, cunhada nos anos 1940 pelo embriologista inglês Conrad Waddington, designa a área da biologia que estuda as modificações químicas motivadas pelo ambiente que levam à ativação ou inativação dos genes e alteram o funcionamento do organismo. Uma das modificações químicas mais comuns e simples sofrida pelos genes é a chamada metilação. Nela, um grupo metila, formado por um átomo de carbono e três de hidrogênio (CH3), acopla-se a um trecho de DNA, impedindo que ele seja lido pelo maquinário da célula. O resultado é o silenciamento daquela região. Estudos com dezenas de espécies de animais, plantas e fungos já mostraram que o perfil de metilação pode ser transmitido de uma geração para outra e afetar as características da prole.

Influência paterna
O papel das mães no sobrepeso dos filhos parece cada vez mais sólido. E quanto ao papel do pai? “Há alguns indícios de que a influência paterna também pode ocorrer, mas eles são menos claros”, diz Martha Bernardi. Por um lado, faz sentido que influências epigenéticas possam ser transmitidas pelo lado paterno – assim como outras células do organismo, os espermatozoides podem ser afetados por alterações no padrão de ativação dos genes produzidas por influência do ambiente. Se tais mudanças não forem totalmente eliminadas após o encontro entre as células sexuais masculinas e os óvulos, o novo indivíduo gerado pela fecundação poderia carregar parte da memória epigenética de seu pai.

Um estudo de 2015, feito por uma equipe da Universidade de Copenhague, na Dinamarca, e liderado por Romain Barrès, mostrou que esse cenário é plausível ao estudar os espermatozoides de 16 homens obesos e outros 10 com peso normal. No caso dos voluntários obesos, os padrões epigenéticos, como os de metilação, concentravam-se em genes ligados ao desenvolvimento do sistema nervoso, em especial os que são importantes para o controle do apetite (e, portanto, do peso), o que não ocorria com os homens magros.

Barrès e seus colegas fizeram outra comparação sugestiva entre as marcações epigenéticas dos espermatozoides dos obesos antes da cirurgia de redução de estômago e as desses mesmos participantes após a operação. Resultado: depois da cirurgia, o padrão epigenético das células lembrava o de homens com peso normal.

“O mais importante a respeito dessas descobertas é sugerir que tais modificações podem ocorrer em células germinativas, ou seja, os óvulos e espermatozoides, e ser transmitidas para gerações seguintes”, diz o médico Licio Augusto Velloso, professor da Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM-Unicamp), que estuda os mecanismos celulares e moleculares ligados à origem da obesidade e do diabetes. “Os estudos epigenéticos avançaram muito na última década e se espera que, num futuro não muito distante, o mapeamento de fatores ambientais e de seu impacto em diferentes aspectos da epigenética nos ajude a prevenir doenças importantes”, afirma Velloso.

Enxergar o excesso de peso pelo prisma epigenético pode trazer mais uma peça relevante para o quebra-cabeça da epidemia global de obesidade e de doenças metabólicas ligadas a ela. Historicamente associado à saúde e à fartura, o excesso de peso se tornou um problema de grandes proporções primeiro nos países ricos, mas hoje é cada vez mais comum em países mais pobres – a começar pelo Brasil, onde quase 60% da população adulta está acima do peso considerado saudável, conforme dados do Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE). Muitos países em desenvolvimento passaram rapidamente de um contexto em que a desnutrição era um problema grave para outro em que a obesidade é muito mais preocupante.

Artigos científicos
JOAQUIM, A. O. et al. Maternal food restriction in rats of the F0 generation increases retroperitoneal fat, the number and size of adipocytes and induces periventricular astrogliosis in female F1 and male F2 generationsReproduction, Fertility and Development. 31 mai. 2016.
JOAQUIM, A. O. et alTransgenerational effects of a hypercaloric dietReproduction, Fertility and Development. 25 ago. 2015.

The secret of scientists who impact policy (Science Daily)

For influence, engaging stakeholders is key, study shows

Date:
February 21, 2017
Source:
University of Vermont
Summary:
Researchers analyzed 15 policy decisions worldwide, with outcomes ranging from new coastal preservation laws to improved species protections, to produce the first quantitative analysis of how environmental knowledge impacts the attitudes and decisions of conservation policymakers.

Environmental scholars have greater policy influence when they engage directly with stakeholders, a UVM-led study says. Credit: Natural Capital Project

Why does some research lead to changes in public policy, while other studies of equal quality do not?

That crucial question — how science impacts policy — is central to the research of University of Vermont (UVM) Prof. Taylor Ricketts and recent alum Stephen Posner.

According to their findings, the most effective way environmental scholars can boost their policy influence — from protecting wildlife to curbing pollution — is to consult widely with stakeholders during the research process.

Speaking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting talk, The Effectiveness of Ecosystem Services Science in Decision-Making, on Feb 18., the team briefed scientists and policy experts on their 2016 study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Outreach trumps findings

Surprisingly, the study finds that stakeholder engagement is a better predictor of future policy impacts than perceived scientific credibility, says Ricketts, Director of UVM’s Gund Institute and Gund Professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources.

The study is the first quantitative analysis of how environmental knowledge impacts the attitudes and decisions of conservation policymakers. Researchers from the UVM, World Wildlife Fund and Natural Capital Project analyzed 15 policy decisions worldwide, with outcomes ranging from new coastal preservation laws to improved species protections.

One hand clapping, academic style

Stephen Posner, a Gund researcher and COMPASS policy engagement associate, characterizes policy-related research without outreach as the academic equivalent of “the sound of one hand clapping.”

“Scholars may have the best policy intentions and important research, but our results suggest that decision-makers are unlikely to listen without meaningful engagement of them and various stakeholders,” he says.

When scholars meet with constituent groups — for example, individual landowners, conservation organizations, or private businesses — it improves policymakers’ perception of scientific knowledge as unbiased and representative of multiple perspectives, the study finds.

“For decision-makers, that made research more legitmate and worthy of policy consideration,” Ricketts adds.

Ways to improve consultation

The research team suggests research institutions offer scholars more time and incentives to improve engagement. They also encourage researchers to seek greater understanding of policy decision-making in their fields, and include stakeholder outreach plans in research projects.

“For those working on policy-related questions, we hope these findings offer a reminder of the value of engaging directly with policy makers and stakeholders, ” Posner says. “This will be crucial as we enter the new political reality of the Trump administration.”

Previous research on science-policy decision-making used qualitative approaches, or focused on a small number of case studies.

Background

The study is called “Policy impacts of ecosystem services knowledge” by Stephen Posner, Emily McKenzie, and Taylor H. Ricketts.

Co-author Emily McKenzie hails from WWF and the Natural Capital Project.

The study used a global sample of regional case studies from the Natural Capital Project, in which researchers used the standardized scientific tool InVest to explore environmental planning and policy outcomes.

Data included surveys of decision-makers and expert review of 15 cases with different levels of policy impact. The forms of engagement studied included emails, phone conversations, individual and group meetings, as well as decision-maker perceptions of the scientific knowledge.


Journal Reference:

  1. Stephen M. Posner, Emily McKenzie, Taylor H. Ricketts. Policy impacts of ecosystem services knowledgeProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2016; 113 (7): 1760 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1502452113

Shell made a film about climate change in 1991 (then neglected to heed its own warning) (The Correspondent)

27.Feb.2017

Confidential documents show that Shell sounded the alarm about global warming as early as 1986. But despite this clear-eyed view of the risks, the oil giant has lobbied against strong climate legislation for decades. Today we make Shell’s 1991 film, Climate of Concern, public again.

By Jelmer MOMMERS

Shell Oil Company has spent millions of dollars lobbying against measures that would protect the planet from climate catastrophe. But thanks to a film recently obtained by The Correspondent, it’s now clear that their position wasn’t born of ignorance. Shell knows that fossil fuels put us all at risk – in fact, they’ve known for over a quarter of a century. Climate of Concern, a 1991 educational film produced by Shell, warned that the company’s own product could lead to extreme weather, floods, famines, and climate refugees, and noted that the reality of climate change was “endorsed by a uniquely broad consensus of scientists.”

The question, ladies and gentlemen, is what did Shell know and when did they know it. The Correspondent would like to enter into evidence Exhibit A: Climate of Concern.

The Climate of Concern stories are the result of over a year of investigative reporting by You can find Jelmer’s original reconstruction here (in Dutch). Jelmer Mommers for The Correspondent. For the English-language version of the main report, we teamed up with the Guardian’s Environment Editor You can find the Guardian piece here. Damian Carrington, who conducted additional research and covered the story for his outlet.

Nobody understands what consciousness is or how it works. Nobody understands quantum mechanics either. Could that be more than coincidence? (BBC)

What is going on in our brains? (Credit: Mehau Kulyk/Science Photo Library)

What is going on in our brains? (Credit: Mehau Kulyk/Science Photo Library)

Quantum mechanics is the best theory we have for describing the world at the nuts-and-bolts level of atoms and subatomic particles. Perhaps the most renowned of its mysteries is the fact that the outcome of a quantum experiment can change depending on whether or not we choose to measure some property of the particles involved.

When this “observer effect” was first noticed by the early pioneers of quantum theory, they were deeply troubled. It seemed to undermine the basic assumption behind all science: that there is an objective world out there, irrespective of us. If the way the world behaves depends on how – or if – we look at it, what can “reality” really mean?

The most famous intrusion of the mind into quantum mechanics comes in the “double-slit experiment”

Some of those researchers felt forced to conclude that objectivity was an illusion, and that consciousness has to be allowed an active role in quantum theory. To others, that did not make sense. Surely, Albert Einstein once complained, the Moon does not exist only when we look at it!

Today some physicists suspect that, whether or not consciousness influences quantum mechanics, it might in fact arise because of it. They think that quantum theory might be needed to fully understand how the brain works.

Might it be that, just as quantum objects can apparently be in two places at once, so a quantum brain can hold onto two mutually-exclusive ideas at the same time?

These ideas are speculative, and it may turn out that quantum physics has no fundamental role either for or in the workings of the mind. But if nothing else, these possibilities show just how strangely quantum theory forces us to think.

The famous double-slit experiment (Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library)

The famous double-slit experiment (Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library)

The most famous intrusion of the mind into quantum mechanics comes in the “double-slit experiment”. Imagine shining a beam of light at a screen that contains two closely-spaced parallel slits. Some of the light passes through the slits, whereupon it strikes another screen.

Light can be thought of as a kind of wave, and when waves emerge from two slits like this they can interfere with each other. If their peaks coincide, they reinforce each other, whereas if a peak and a trough coincide, they cancel out. This wave interference is called diffraction, and it produces a series of alternating bright and dark stripes on the back screen, where the light waves are either reinforced or cancelled out.

The implication seems to be that each particle passes simultaneously through both slits

This experiment was understood to be a characteristic of wave behaviour over 200 years ago, well before quantum theory existed.

The double slit experiment can also be performed with quantum particles like electrons; tiny charged particles that are components of atoms. In a counter-intuitive twist, these particles can behave like waves. That means they can undergo diffraction when a stream of them passes through the two slits, producing an interference pattern.

Now suppose that the quantum particles are sent through the slits one by one, and their arrival at the screen is likewise seen one by one. Now there is apparently nothing for each particle to interfere with along its route – yet nevertheless the pattern of particle impacts that builds up over time reveals interference bands.

The implication seems to be that each particle passes simultaneously through both slits and interferes with itself. This combination of “both paths at once” is known as a superposition state.

But here is the really odd thing.

The double-slit experiment (Credit: GIPhotoStock/Science Photo Library)

The double-slit experiment (Credit: GIPhotoStock/Science Photo Library)

If we place a detector inside or just behind one slit, we can find out whether any given particle goes through it or not. In that case, however, the interference vanishes. Simply by observing a particle’s path – even if that observation should not disturb the particle’s motion – we change the outcome.

The physicist Pascual Jordan, who worked with quantum guru Niels Bohr in Copenhagen in the 1920s, put it like this: “observations not only disturb what has to be measured, they produce it… We compel [a quantum particle] to assume a definite position.” In other words, Jordan said, “we ourselves produce the results of measurements.”

If that is so, objective reality seems to go out of the window.

And it gets even stranger.

Particles can be in two states (Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library)

Particles can be in two states (Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library)

If nature seems to be changing its behaviour depending on whether we “look” or not, we could try to trick it into showing its hand. To do so, we could measure which path a particle took through the double slits, but only after it has passed through them. By then, it ought to have “decided” whether to take one path or both.

The sheer act of noticing, rather than any physical disturbance caused by measuring, can cause the collapse

An experiment for doing this was proposed in the 1970s by the American physicist John Wheeler, and this “delayed choice” experiment was performed in the following decade. It uses clever techniques to make measurements on the paths of quantum particles (generally, particles of light, called photons) after they should have chosen whether to take one path or a superposition of two.

It turns out that, just as Bohr confidently predicted, it makes no difference whether we delay the measurement or not. As long as we measure the photon’s path before its arrival at a detector is finally registered, we lose all interference.

It is as if nature “knows” not just if we are looking, but if we are planning to look.

(Credit: Emilio Segre Visual Archives/American Institute Physics/Science Photo Library)

Eugene Wigner (Credit: Emilio Segre Visual Archives/American Institute of Physics/Science Photo Library)

Whenever, in these experiments, we discover the path of a quantum particle, its cloud of possible routes “collapses” into a single well-defined state. What’s more, the delayed-choice experiment implies that the sheer act of noticing, rather than any physical disturbance caused by measuring, can cause the collapse. But does this mean that true collapse has only happened when the result of a measurement impinges on our consciousness?

It is hard to avoid the implication that consciousness and quantum mechanics are somehow linked

That possibility was admitted in the 1930s by the Hungarian physicist Eugene Wigner. “It follows that the quantum description of objects is influenced by impressions entering my consciousness,” he wrote. “Solipsism may be logically consistent with present quantum mechanics.”

Wheeler even entertained the thought that the presence of living beings, which are capable of “noticing”, has transformed what was previously a multitude of possible quantum pasts into one concrete history. In this sense, Wheeler said, we become participants in the evolution of the Universe since its very beginning. In his words, we live in a “participatory universe.”

To this day, physicists do not agree on the best way to interpret these quantum experiments, and to some extent what you make of them is (at the moment) up to you. But one way or another, it is hard to avoid the implication that consciousness and quantum mechanics are somehow linked.

Beginning in the 1980s, the British physicist Roger Penrosesuggested that the link might work in the other direction. Whether or not consciousness can affect quantum mechanics, he said, perhaps quantum mechanics is involved in consciousness.

Physicist and mathematician Roger Penrose (Credit: Max Alexander/Science Photo Library)

Physicist and mathematician Roger Penrose (Credit: Max Alexander/Science Photo Library)

What if, Penrose asked, there are molecular structures in our brains that are able to alter their state in response to a single quantum event. Could not these structures then adopt a superposition state, just like the particles in the double slit experiment? And might those quantum superpositions then show up in the ways neurons are triggered to communicate via electrical signals?

Maybe, says Penrose, our ability to sustain seemingly incompatible mental states is no quirk of perception, but a real quantum effect.

Perhaps quantum mechanics is involved in consciousness

After all, the human brain seems able to handle cognitive processes that still far exceed the capabilities of digital computers. Perhaps we can even carry out computational tasks that are impossible on ordinary computers, which use classical digital logic.

Penrose first proposed that quantum effects feature in human cognition in his 1989 book The Emperor’s New Mind. The idea is called Orch-OR, which is short for “orchestrated objective reduction”. The phrase “objective reduction” means that, as Penrose believes, the collapse of quantum interference and superposition is a real, physical process, like the bursting of a bubble.

Orch-OR draws on Penrose’s suggestion that gravity is responsible for the fact that everyday objects, such as chairs and planets, do not display quantum effects. Penrose believes that quantum superpositions become impossible for objects much larger than atoms, because their gravitational effects would then force two incompatible versions of space-time to coexist.

Penrose developed this idea further with American physician Stuart Hameroff. In his 1994 book Shadows of the Mind, he suggested that the structures involved in this quantum cognition might be protein strands called microtubules. These are found in most of our cells, including the neurons in our brains. Penrose and Hameroff argue that vibrations of microtubules can adopt a quantum superposition.

But there is no evidence that such a thing is remotely feasible.

Microtubules inside a cell (Credit: Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Photo Library)

Microtubules inside a cell (Credit: Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Photo Library)

It has been suggested that the idea of quantum superpositions in microtubules is supported by experiments described in 2013, but in fact those studies made no mention of quantum effects.

Besides, most researchers think that the Orch-OR idea was ruled out by a study published in 2000. Physicist Max Tegmark calculated that quantum superpositions of the molecules involved in neural signaling could not survive for even a fraction of the time needed for such a signal to get anywhere.

Other researchers have found evidence for quantum effects in living beings

Quantum effects such as superposition are easily destroyed, because of a process called decoherence. This is caused by the interactions of a quantum object with its surrounding environment, through which the “quantumness” leaks away.

Decoherence is expected to be extremely rapid in warm and wet environments like living cells.

Nerve signals are electrical pulses, caused by the passage of electrically-charged atoms across the walls of nerve cells. If one of these atoms was in a superposition and then collided with a neuron, Tegmark showed that the superposition should decay in less than one billion billionth of a second. It takes at least ten thousand trillion times as long for a neuron to discharge a signal.

As a result, ideas about quantum effects in the brain are viewed with great skepticism.

However, Penrose is unmoved by those arguments and stands by the Orch-OR hypothesis. And despite Tegmark’s prediction of ultra-fast decoherence in cells, other researchers have found evidence for quantum effects in living beings. Some argue that quantum mechanics is harnessed by migratory birds that use magnetic navigation, and by green plants when they use sunlight to make sugars in photosynthesis.

Besides, the idea that the brain might employ quantum tricks shows no sign of going away. For there is now another, quite different argument for it.

Could phosphorus sustain a quantum state? (Credit: Phil Degginger/Science Photo Library)

Could phosphorus sustain a quantum state? (Credit: Phil Degginger/Science Photo Library)

In a study published in 2015, physicist Matthew Fisher of the University of California at Santa Barbara argued that the brain might contain molecules capable of sustaining more robust quantum superpositions. Specifically, he thinks that the nuclei of phosphorus atoms may have this ability.

Phosphorus atoms are everywhere in living cells. They often take the form of phosphate ions, in which one phosphorus atom joins up with four oxygen atoms.

Such ions are the basic unit of energy within cells. Much of the cell’s energy is stored in molecules called ATP, which contain a string of three phosphate groups joined to an organic molecule. When one of the phosphates is cut free, energy is released for the cell to use.

Cells have molecular machinery for assembling phosphate ions into groups and cleaving them off again. Fisher suggested a scheme in which two phosphate ions might be placed in a special kind of superposition called an “entangled state”.

Phosphorus spins could resist decoherence for a day or so, even in living cells

The phosphorus nuclei have a quantum property called spin, which makes them rather like little magnets with poles pointing in particular directions. In an entangled state, the spin of one phosphorus nucleus depends on that of the other.

Put another way, entangled states are really superposition states involving more than one quantum particle.

Fisher says that the quantum-mechanical behaviour of these nuclear spins could plausibly resist decoherence on human timescales. He agrees with Tegmark that quantum vibrations, like those postulated by Penrose and Hameroff, will be strongly affected by their surroundings “and will decohere almost immediately”. But nuclear spins do not interact very strongly with their surroundings.

All the same, quantum behaviour in the phosphorus nuclear spins would have to be “protected” from decoherence.

Quantum particles can have different spins (Credit: Richard Kail/Science Photo Library)

Quantum particles can have different spins (Credit: Richard Kail/Science Photo Library)

This might happen, Fisher says, if the phosphorus atoms are incorporated into larger objects called “Posner molecules”. These are clusters of six phosphate ions, combined with nine calcium ions. There is some evidence that they can exist in living cells, though this is currently far from conclusive.

I decided… to explore how on earth the lithium ion could have such a dramatic effect in treating mental conditions

In Posner molecules, Fisher argues, phosphorus spins could resist decoherence for a day or so, even in living cells. That means they could influence how the brain works.

The idea is that Posner molecules can be swallowed up by neurons. Once inside, the Posner molecules could trigger the firing of a signal to another neuron, by falling apart and releasing their calcium ions.

Because of entanglement in Posner molecules, two such signals might thus in turn become entangled: a kind of quantum superposition of a “thought”, you might say. “If quantum processing with nuclear spins is in fact present in the brain, it would be an extremely common occurrence, happening pretty much all the time,” Fisher says.

He first got this idea when he started thinking about mental illness.

A capsule of lithium carbonate (Credit: Custom Medical Stock Photo/Science Photo Library)

A capsule of lithium carbonate (Credit: Custom Medical Stock Photo/Science Photo Library)

“My entry into the biochemistry of the brain started when I decided three or four years ago to explore how on earth the lithium ion could have such a dramatic effect in treating mental conditions,” Fisher says.

At this point, Fisher’s proposal is no more than an intriguing idea

Lithium drugs are widely used for treating bipolar disorder. They work, but nobody really knows how.

“I wasn’t looking for a quantum explanation,” Fisher says. But then he came across a paper reporting that lithium drugs had different effects on the behaviour of rats, depending on what form – or “isotope” – of lithium was used.

On the face of it, that was extremely puzzling. In chemical terms, different isotopes behave almost identically, so if the lithium worked like a conventional drug the isotopes should all have had the same effect.

Nerve cells are linked at synapses (Credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki/Science Photo Library)

Nerve cells are linked at synapses (Credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki/Science Photo Library)

But Fisher realised that the nuclei of the atoms of different lithium isotopes can have different spins. This quantum property might affect the way lithium drugs act. For example, if lithium substitutes for calcium in Posner molecules, the lithium spins might “feel” and influence those of phosphorus atoms, and so interfere with their entanglement.

We do not even know what consciousness is

If this is true, it would help to explain why lithium can treat bipolar disorder.

At this point, Fisher’s proposal is no more than an intriguing idea. But there are several ways in which its plausibility can be tested, starting with the idea that phosphorus spins in Posner molecules can keep their quantum coherence for long periods. That is what Fisher aims to do next.

All the same, he is wary of being associated with the earlier ideas about “quantum consciousness”, which he sees as highly speculative at best.

Consciousness is a profound mystery (Credit: Sciepro/Science Photo Library)

Consciousness is a profound mystery (Credit: Sciepro/Science Photo Library)

Physicists are not terribly comfortable with finding themselves inside their theories. Most hope that consciousness and the brain can be kept out of quantum theory, and perhaps vice versa. After all, we do not even know what consciousness is, let alone have a theory to describe it.

We all know what red is like, but we have no way to communicate the sensation

It does not help that there is now a New Age cottage industrydevoted to notions of “quantum consciousness“, claiming that quantum mechanics offers plausible rationales for such things as telepathy and telekinesis.

As a result, physicists are often embarrassed to even mention the words “quantum” and “consciousness” in the same sentence.

But setting that aside, the idea has a long history. Ever since the “observer effect” and the mind first insinuated themselves into quantum theory in the early days, it has been devilishly hard to kick them out. A few researchers think we might never manage to do so.

In 2016, Adrian Kent of the University of Cambridge in the UK, one of the most respected “quantum philosophers”, speculated that consciousness might alter the behaviour of quantum systems in subtle but detectable ways.

We do not understand how thoughts work (Credit: Andrzej Wojcicki/Science Photo Library)

We do not understand how thoughts work (Credit: Andrzej Wojcicki/Science Photo Library)

Kent is very cautious about this idea. “There is no compelling reason of principle to believe that quantum theory is the right theory in which to try to formulate a theory of consciousness, or that the problems of quantum theory must have anything to do with the problem of consciousness,” he admits.

Every line of thought on the relationship of consciousness to physics runs into deep trouble

But he says that it is hard to see how a description of consciousness based purely on pre-quantum physics can account for all the features it seems to have.

One particularly puzzling question is how our conscious minds can experience unique sensations, such as the colour red or the smell of frying bacon. With the exception of people with visual impairments, we all know what red is like, but we have no way to communicate the sensation and there is nothing in physics that tells us what it should be like.

Sensations like this are called “qualia”. We perceive them as unified properties of the outside world, but in fact they are products of our consciousness – and that is hard to explain. Indeed, in 1995 philosopher David Chalmers dubbed it “the hard problem” of consciousness.

How does our consciousness work? (Credit: Victor Habbick Visions/Science Photo Library)

How does our consciousness work? (Credit: Victor Habbick Visions/Science Photo Library)

“Every line of thought on the relationship of consciousness to physics runs into deep trouble,” says Kent.

This has prompted him to suggest that “we could make some progress on understanding the problem of the evolution of consciousness if we supposed that consciousnesses alters (albeit perhaps very slightly and subtly) quantum probabilities.”

“Quantum consciousness” is widely derided as mystical woo, but it just will not go away

In other words, the mind could genuinely affect the outcomes of measurements.

It does not, in this view, exactly determine “what is real”. But it might affect the chance that each of the possible actualities permitted by quantum mechanics is the one we do in fact observe, in a way that quantum theory itself cannot predict. Kent says that we might look for such effects experimentally.

He even bravely estimates the chances of finding them. “I would give credence of perhaps 15% that something specifically to do with consciousness causes deviations from quantum theory, with perhaps 3% credence that this will be experimentally detectable within the next 50 years,” he says.

If that happens, it would transform our ideas about both physics and the mind. That seems a chance worth exploring.

Torcida única nos clássicos do Rio divide opiniões entre entidades e especialistas (O Globo)

Comandante do Gepe admite que comportamento das organizadas passou do tolerável

POR BERNARDO MELLO / TATIANA FURTADO

16/02/2017 12:25 / atualizado 16/02/2017 17:22

Torcedores socorrem um ferido no confronto entre organizadas de Flamengo e Botafogo – Marcelo Theobald / Agência O Globo

A ação civil pública, do Minstério Público Estadual (MPE), que pede torcida única nos clássicos cariocas ainda será apreciada pelo Juizado do Torcedor e Grandes Eventos. Porém, as autoridades envolvidas diretamente nos casos de brigas entre facções organizadas tendem a concordar com a proibição, ou alguma solução mais efetiva. O argumento voltou à tona após os episódios de violência no confronto entre Botafogo e Flamengo, no último domingo, no Engenhão, que terminaram com a morte de um torcedor e deixaram oito feridos.

A decisão será do juiz Guilherme Schilling, que assumiu o Juizado do Torcedor e Grandes Eventos, este mês. O ex ocupante do cargo, o juiz Marcelo Rubioli, agora no Tribunal de Justiça do Rio, considera que esse pode ser o primeiro degrau para se chegar a um modelo mais seguro para os torcedores.

– Acho que é um caminho. O próximo, talvez, seja inserir os espetáculos esportivos no planjemanto das forças armadas, que estão em caráter excepcional no Rio até o fim do Carnaval. A possibilidade de jogo com portões fechados não é viável do ponto de vista dos clubes. Mas estamos tratando do Estatuto, que prevê a proteção dos torcedores – sugere Rubioli, acrescentando que o interior dos estádios não tem tido problemas graves de segurança, salvo o caso recente do jogo entre Flamengo e Corinthians, no Maracanã. – Hoje, o estádio é um local seguro. No caso de torcida única em clássicos, não haveria aglomeração daquela que não vai entrar nas proximidades. Não tem como garantir qual medida vai ser mais eficaz.

Comandante do Grupamento Especial de Policiamente em Estádios (Gepe), o Major Silvio Luís, informou que vai conversar com o MPE e o Juizado para saber detalhes do pedido, antes de emitir uma opinião sobre o assunto. Porém, o responsável pelo policiamento nos estádios e acompanhamento das organizadas em dias de jogo, ressalta que, diante do comportamento das torcidas, algo precisa ser feito.

– Preciso avaliar o que estão propondo, mas o que posso dizer é que o comportamento das torcidas já passou do tolerável – afirmou o Major, destacando que os clássicos do Rio só não são com torcida dividida igualmente quando a configuração do estádio não permite. – Já tivemos casos assim em São Januário e na Arena da Ilha, onde os visitantes só podem receber 10% dos ingressos.

QUESTÃO ALÉM DOS ESTÁDIOS

As evidências, contudo, apontam que o problema vai além dos estádios. Antes do caso no Engenhão, a última briga de grandes proporções entre torcedores de Flamengo e Botafogo havia acontecido em julho de 2016, terminando com um morto. O conflito ocorreu em Bento Ribeiro, bairro da Zona Norte localizado a mais de 20 km do Estádio Luso-Brasileiro, onde os times se enfrentavam naquele dia.

Para o antropólogo Renzo Taddei, professor da Unifesp e autor de pesquisas sobre torcidas organizadas no futebol, o problema principal não é sequer a falta de policiamento, seja dentro ou fora de estádios. Na avaliação do especialista, torcedores e polícia desenvolveram, ao longo de décadas, uma relação turbulenta que tem questões sociais como pano de fundo:

– Não é à toa que a maior parte da violência a que uma torcida é submetida ou se submete em sua existência são conflitos contra a polícia, e não contra alguma torcida inimiga. O Estado impõe a segmentos inteiros da população um código de comunicação onde não há palavras, apenas brutalidade – avalia.

Torcedores exibem bandeirão pedindo a paz nos estádios em clássico entre Botafogo x Flamengo, marcado por cenas de violência no Engenhão – Marcelo Theobald / Agência O Globo

Taddei argumenta que o distanciamento entre torcidas organizadas e o restante da sociedade tende, na verdade, a acentuar a presença de membros que infringem a lei. Na opinião do antropólogo, lidar com a questão da violência no futebol depende de mais diálogo.

– Se houvesse uma interlocução saudável entre as comunidades das torcidas e o poder público, a mídia e a sociedade em geral, essas situações seriam mais fáceis de serem evitadas. O que eu estou dizendo é que muito menos do que 1% dos integrantes das torcidas causam problemas. Veja só: os Gaviões da Fiel tem cerca de 25 mil associados; as torcidas do Flamengo são também imensas. E qual o saldo do problema com as torcidas? Em 2016 foram 9 mortos em estádios. É muito mais perigoso andar de bicicleta do que ir ao estádio.

PROCURADOR VAI CONTESTAR NA JUSTIÇA

Segundo o blog Gente Boa, a Procuradoria Geral do Estado vai contestar na Justiça o pedido do Ministério Público para que os clássicos do Rio tenham torcida única nos estádios.

– É uma medida inadequada – diz o procurador-geral do Estado, Leonardo Espíndola – O Fla-Flu, por exemplo, é um patrimônio nacional que não pode ser banido por conta da ação de vândalos.

O Botafogo, por meio de nota da assessoria de imprensa, elogiou o trabalho do Gepe, mas se mostrou aberto a experiências que possam tornar os estádios mais seguros.

“Apesar de considerar que no último domingo houve um ponto fora da curva, pois o Gepe sabe fazer escolta, chegada e saída de organizadas, o Botafogo é favorável a experiências no sentido de melhorar as condições de segurança do futebol. Esse tipo de experiência, de torcida única, já deu certo em outros estados. O que o Botafogo não considera simples é ter a responsabilidade de cadastramento de membros de organizadas. É uma premissa quase impossível, porque os clubes não têm poder de fichar torcedores nem tem como controlar acesso a um local. Para o poder público, pode ser mais viável. Se for a decisão dos órgãos competentes, o Botafogo estará pronto para colaborar”, diz a nota.

Já o Flamengo, através de seu presidente Eduardo Bandeira de Mello, disse ser “totalmente contra” a torcida única em clássicos. O Fluminense, por sua vez, mostrou preocupação de que a medida acabe adotada de forma definitiva.

Além do veto à divisão das arquibancadas em clássicos, o promotor Rodrigo Terra também pede aos clubes que “se abstenham de fornecer gratuitamente ingressos às suas torcidas organizadas”. O Botafogo garante que não distribui bilhetes para as organizadas.

Veja também

Leia mais sobre esse assunto em  http://oglobo.globo.com/esportes/torcida-unica-nos-classicos-do-rio-divide-opinioes-entre-entidades-especialistas-20936250#ixzz4Z4rXMmZ1
© 1996 – 2017. Todos direitos reservados a Infoglobo Comunicação e Participações S.A. Este material não pode ser publicado, transmitido por broadcast, reescrito ou redistribuído sem autorização.

Long Before Making Enigmatic Earthworks, People Reshaped Brazil’s Rain Forest (N.Y.Times)

By   FEB. 10, 2017

New research suggests people were sustainably managing the Amazon rain forest much earlier than was previously thought. Credit: Jenny Watling 

Deep in the Amazon, the rain forest once covered ancient secrets. Spread across hundreds of thousands of acres are massive, geometric earthworks. The carvings stretch out in circles and squares that can be as big as a city block, with trenches up to 12 yards wide and 13 feet deep. They appear to have been built up to 2,000 years ago.

Were the broken ceramics found near the entrances used for ritual sacrifices? Why were they here? The answer remains a mystery.

There are 450 geoglyphs concentrated in Brazil’s Acre State. Credit: Jenny Watling 

For centuries, the enigmatic structures remained hidden to all but a few archaeologists. Then in the 1980s, ranchers cleared land to raise cattle, uncovering the true extent of the earthworks in the process. More than 450 of these geoglyphs are concentrated within Acre State in Brazil.

Since the discovery, archaeological study of the earthworks and other evidence has challenged the notion that the rain forests of the Amazon were untouched by human hands before the arrival of European explorers in the 15th century. And while the true purpose of the geoglyphs remains unknown, a study published on Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers new insight into the lives of the ancient people who lived in the Amazon. Thousands of years before the earthworks were built, humans were managing the forests, using what appear to be sustainable agricultural practices.

“Our study was looking at the environmental impact that the geoglyph builders had on the landscape,” said Jennifer Watling, an archaeologist at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, who conducted the research while a student at the University of Exeter in Britain. “A lot of people have the idea that the Amazon forests are pristine forests, never touched by humans, and that’s obviously not the case.”

Dr. Watling and her team reconstructed a 6,000-year-old environmental history of two geoglyph sites in the Amazon rain forest. To do this, they searched for clues in soil samples in and around the sites. Microscopic plant fossils called phytoliths told them about ancient vegetation. Bits of charcoal revealed evidence of burnings. And a kind of carbon dating gave them a sense of how open the vegetation had been in the past.

About 4,000 years ago, people started burning the forest, which was mostly bamboo, just enough to make small openings. They may have planted maize or squash, weeded out some underbrush, and transported seeds or saplings to create a partly curated forest of useful tree products that Dr. Watling calls a “prehistoric supermarket.” After that, they started building the geoglyphs. The presence of just a few artifacts, and the layout of the earthworks, suggest they weren’t used as ancient villages or for military defenses. They were likely built for rituals, some archaeologists suspect.

Dr. Watling and her colleagues found that in contrast with the large-scale deforestation we see today — which threatens about 20 percent of the largest rain forest in the world — ancient indigenous people of the Amazon practiced something more akin to what we now call agroforestry. They restricted burns to site locations and maintained the surrounding landscape, creating small, temporary clearings in the bamboo and promoting the growth of plants like palm, cedar and Brazil nut that were, and still are, useful commodities. Today, indigenous groups around the world continue these sustainable practices in forests.

“Indigenous communities have actually transformed the ecosystem over a very long time,” said Dr. Watling. “The modern forest owes its biodiversity to the agroforestry practices that were happening during the time of the geoglyph builders.”

Entidade esotérica que controla o tempo faz parceria com Doria (Região Noroeste)

BIZARRO

08/02/2017 – as 17:00:00

Pouca gente sabe no Brasil, mas no Rio de Janeiro o povo se acostumou a ver um espírito tendo contrato com a prefeitura para controlar o tempo e evitar enchentes e outras tragédias. O contrato com a Fundação Cacique Cobra Coral começou com o prefeito César Maia em 2001 e durou até a última gestão, de Eduardo Paes.

O novo prefeito, bispo evangélico Marcelo Crivella, não renovou o contrato. Mas o que será de Cobra Coral, o espírito que encarna na médium Adelaide Scritori e já teria encarnado antes no cientista Galileu Galilei e no ex-presidente dos Estados Unidos, Abraham Lincoln?

Segundo o jornal O Globo, o espírito de Cobra Coral, por meio de seu porta-voz Osmar Santos, firmou parceria com o prefeito de São Paulo, João Doria Júnior, para diminuir os impactos das chuvas na maior cidade do país.

“São Paulo vai exigir mais esforço e empenho pessoal do cacique. É muito mais difícil atuar para dispersar as chuvas por ser uma cidade mais plana. No Rio, o relevo ajuda, pois tem como desviar as nuvens para regiões montanhosas ou o mar”, disse Santos ao jornal.

João Doria apela para o ‘sobrenatural’ em São Paulo (Encontro)

O prefeito anunciou um contrato com a fundação Cacique Cobra Coral, que, supostamente, consegue controlar o tempo

por Marcelo Fraga  08/02/2017 08:14

Instagram/jdoriajr/Reprodução

O prefeito de São Paulo, João Dória Júnior, já causou polêmica com seu projeto Cidade Linda e, agora, acaba de fechar uma parceria com uma entidade “sobrenatural” que diz controlar o tempo (foto: Instagram/jdoriajr/Reprodução)

Recém-empossado prefeito de São Paulo, o empresário João Doria Júnior começou sua trajetória à frente da capital paulista com medidas polêmicas. Logo nos primeiros dias no poder, ele já se vestiu de Gari, simulou ser cadeirante e mandou apagar grafites em pontos famosos de SP. Agora, a mais nova ação de Doria também promete causar controvérsia.

De acordo com a jornalista Cleo Guimarães, responsável pela coluna Gente Boa, do jornal O Globo, o prefeito fechou uma parceria com a fundação Cacique Cobra Coral (FCCC), conhecida por, supostamente, conseguir “intervir” no tempo de forma mediúnica – teria “poderes sobrenaturais”.

De acordo com Cleo Guimarães, a FCCC estaria de mudança para a China, mas, a entidade decidiu permanecer no Brasil porque pretende dar “atenção especial a São Paulo”. Ainda segundo a jornalista, a fundação negociou com os chineses um trabalho à distância. Não se sabe qual função terá a Cacique Cobra Coral no país mais populoso do mundo.

Em seu site oficial, a FCCC afirma que sua missão é “minimizar catástrofes que podem ocorrer em razão dos desequilíbrios provocados pelo homem na natureza”. Isso, segundo a entidade, é feito por meio de sua presidente, Adelaide Scritori, filha do fundador, Ângelo Scritori. Ela, supostamente, incorpora o espírito do Cacique Cobra Coral e, assim, consegue intervir no clima.

Um dos casos famosos de atuação da fundação se deu em 2009, quando a médium Adelaide Scritori foi convocada pela prefeitura do Rio de Janeiro para usar seus supostos poderes para evitar a tempestade que prevista para a tradicional festa de Réveillon em Copacabana.