Arquivo da tag: COP27

U.N. Climate Talks End With a Deal to Pay Poor Nations for Damage (New York Times)

nytimes.com

Brad Plumer, Max Bearak, Lisa Friedman, Jenny Gross

Nov. 20, 2022


Nations reached a landmark deal to compensate developing nations for climate harm. But some leaders said the summit didn’t go far enough in addressing the root causes of global warming.

A man in a dark suit, seated at a long desk, reads while others stand next to him and applaud. In the background, a wall is blue with a wavy light blue line.
Sameh Shoukry, the Egyptian foreign minister, seated, reading a statement at the closing session of climate talks in Sharm el Sheikh. Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

Nov. 20, 2022, 3:33 a.m. ET

SHARM EL SHEIKH, Egypt — Diplomats from nearly 200 countries concluded two weeks of climate talks on Sunday by agreeing to establish a fund that would help poor, vulnerable countries cope with climate disasters made worse by the greenhouse gases from wealthy nations.

The decision on payments for loss and damage caused by global warming represented a breakthrough on one of the most contentious issues at United Nations climate negotiations. For more than three decades, developing nations have pressed rich, industrialized countries to provide compensation for the costs of destructive storms, heat waves and droughts linked to rising temperatures.

But the United States and other wealthy countries had long blocked the idea, for fear that they could face unlimited liability for the greenhouse gas emissions that are driving climate change.

The loss and damage agreement hammered out in this Red Sea resort town makes clear that payments are not to be seen as an admission of liability. The deal calls for a committee with representatives from 24 countries to work over the next year to figure out exactly what form the fund should take, which countries and financial institutions should contribute, and where the money should go. Many of the other details are still to be determined.

Developing countries hailed the deal as a landmark victory.

“The announcement offers hope to vulnerable communities all over the world who are fighting for their survival from climate stress,” said Sherry Rehman, the climate minister of Pakistan, which suffered catastrophic flooding this summer that left one-third of the country underwater and caused $30 billion in damages. Scientists later found that global warming had worsened the deluges.

While the new climate agreement dealt with the damages from global warming, it did far less to address the greenhouse gas emissions that are the root cause of the crisis. Experts say it is crucial for all nations to slash their emissions much more rapidly in order to keep warming at relatively safe levels. But the deal did not go much beyond what countries agreed to last year at U.N. climate talks in Glasgow.

“The loss and damage deal agreed is a positive step, but it risks becoming a ‘fund for the end of the world’ if countries don’t move faster to slash emissions,” said Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, who presided over the United Nations summit in 2014 and is now the climate lead for the World Wide Fund for Nature. “We cannot afford to have another climate summit like this one.”

The new agreement emphasizes that countries should strive to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels. Beyond that threshold, scientists say, the risk of climate catastrophes increases significantly. Early in the summit, some negotiators feared that the talks would abandon a focus on that target, which many vulnerable nations, such as low-lying islands in the Pacific, see as essential to their survival.

Current policies by national governments would put the world on track for a much hotter 2.1 to 2.9 degrees Celsius of warming this century, compared with preindustrial levels. Staying at 1.5 degrees would require countries to slash their fossil-fuel emissions roughly in half this decade, a daunting task.

India and more than 80 other countries wanted language that would have called for a “phase-down” of all fossil fuels, not just coal, but also oil and gas. That would have gone beyond the deal at Glasgow, which called for a “phase-down” of coal only. But that effort was blocked by major oil producers like Canada and Saudi Arabia, as well as by China, according to people close to the negotiations.

“It is more than frustrating to see overdue steps on mitigation and the phaseout of fossil energies being stonewalled by a number of large emitters and oil producers,” said Annalena Baerbock, the German foreign minister, in a statement.

A man in a dark suit and a woman in black bump fists.
Xie Zhenhua, China’s special envoy for climate, and Sherry Rehman, Pakistan’s climate minister, at the COP27 closing session on Sunday. Credit: Peter Dejong/Associated Press

Frans Timmermans, the European Union’s top climate official, said the deal fell far short of what was needed and was a sign of the growing gap between climate science and national climate policies. Too many countries blocked measures needed to address global warming, he said.

“Friends are only friends if they also tell you things you might not want to hear,” Mr. Timmermans said. “This is the make-or-break decade, but what we have in front of us is not enough of a step forward for people and planet.”

The two-week summit, which had been scheduled to end on Friday, stretched until dawn on Sunday as exhausted negotiators from nearly 200 nations clashed over fine print. The talks came at a time of multiple crises. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has roiled global food supply and energy markets, stoked inflation and spurred some countries to burn more coal and other alternatives to Russian gas, threatening to undermine climate goals.

At the same time, rising global temperatures have intensified deadly floods in places like Pakistan and Nigeria, as well as fueled record heat across Europe and Asia. In the Horn of Africa, a third year of severe drought has brought millions to the brink of famine.

Much of the focus over the past two weeks was on loss and damage.

Developing nations — largely from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and South Pacific — fought first to place the debate over a loss and damage fund on the formal agenda of the two-week summit. And then they were relentless in their pressure campaign, arguing that it was a matter of justice, noting they did little to contribute to a crisis that threatens their existence. They made it clear that a summit held on the African continent that ended without addressing loss and damage would be seen as a moral failure.

As the summit neared its end, the European Union consented to the idea of a loss and damage fund, though it insisted that any aid should be primarily focused on the most vulnerable nations, and that aid might include a wide variety of options such as new insurance programs in addition to direct payments.

That left the United States, which has pumped more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than any nation in history, as the last big holdout. By Saturday, as talks stretched into overtime, American officials said that they would accept a loss and damage fund, breaking the logjam.

Still, major hurdles remain.

There is no guarantee that wealthy countries will deposit money into the fund. A decade ago, the United States, the European Union and other wealthy emitters pledged to mobilize $100 billion per year in climate finance by 2020 to help poorer countries shift to clean energy and adapt to future climate risks through measures like building sea walls. They are still falling short by tens of billions of dollars annually.

And while American diplomats agreed to a fund, money must be appropriated by Congress. Last year, the Biden administration sought $2.5 billion in climate finance but secured just $1 billion, and that was when Democrats controlled both chambers. With Republicans set to take over the House in January, the prospects of Congress approving an entirely new pot of money for loss and damage appear dim.

“Sending U.S. taxpayer dollars to a U.N. sponsored green slush fund is completely misguided,” said Senator John Barrasso, Republican of Wyoming. “The Biden administration should focus on lowering spending at home, not shipping money to the U.N. for new climate deals. Innovation, not reparations, is key to fighting climate change.”

The United States and the European Union secured language in the deal that could expand the donor base to include major emerging economies like China and Saudi Arabia. The United Nations currently classifies China as a developing country, which has traditionally exempted it from obligations to provide climate aid, even though it is now the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gases as well as the second-largest economy. The new changes are likely to spark fights in the future, since China has fiercely resisted being treated as a developed nation in global climate talks.

For their part, a variety of European nations have voluntarily pledged more than $300 million to address loss and damage so far, with most of that money going toward a new insurance program to help countries recover from disasters like flooding. Poorer countries have praised those early efforts while noting that they may ultimately face hundreds of billions of dollars per year in unavoidable, irreversible climate damages.

“We have the fund, but we need money to make it worthwhile,” said Mohamed Adow, executive director of Power Shift Africa, a group that aims to mobilize climate action across the continent. “What we have is an empty bucket. Now we need to fill it so that support can flow to the most impacted people who are suffering right now at the hands of the climate crisis.”

Mariana Belmont – Movimentos negro e indígena lançam ‘Declaração de Resistência’ na COP27 (ECOA Uol)

uol.com.br

OPINIÃO

Mariana Belmont – Colunista do UOL

10/11/2022 06h00

COP 27 acontece no Egito. Imagem: Sayed Sheasha/Reuters


Os integrantes dos povos indígenas de Abya Yala e dos povos negros e afrodescendentes em representação dos povos e comunidades e diásporas do Canadá, Estados Unidos, México, Chile, Honduras, Nicarágua, Colômbia, Equador, Peru, Bolívia, Uruguai, Brasil, Haiti, Argentina, Guatemala, República Dominicana, Trinidad e Tobago, Panamá, Suriname, Jamaica, Porto Rico, Uganda, Cuba, Venezuela, no marco da rememoração dos 530 anos de resistência dos Povos Indígenas, Negros e Afrodescendentes lançam na COP27 a “Declaração de Resistência anticolonial indígena, negra e afrodescendente“, com uma lista importante de proposições para outros tempos no mundo.

A articulação se apresenta como um movimento anticolonial, antirracista, antixenofóbico, antipatriarcal, antihomofóbico e antilesbotransfóbico.

Como Movimento de Libertação Negra e Indígena, a nossa luta é interseccional, transeccional, antirracista, feminista comunitária, Afrofeminista, mulherista africana, de identidades políticas diversas em comunidade.

Buscamos evidenciar e questionar a inegável relação existente entre colonialismo, capitalismo, patriarcado e racismo. Reivindicando a autonomia de seus corpos e reconhecendo a complementaridade dos que habitam os territórios e a participação das mulheres e dissidências para a defesa da vida, o território e a preservação dos saberes e conhecimentos ancestrais.

Em busca da formação de uma plataforma sustentada em redes comunitárias sólidas, integradas por organizações e coletivos sociais indígenas, negros e afrodescendentes do continente, com o fim de favorecer o acionar coletivo, solidário, coordenado e organizado.

No Brasil organizações como Instituto de Referência Negra Peregum, Uneafro Brasil, Criola, Instituto Perifa Sustentável e Coordenação Nacional de Articulação de Quilombos (CONAQ) assinaram a declaração, reforçando a importância de um diálogo internacional entre os povos.

Entre as proposições estão que o dia 12 de outubro seja declarado como o dia da resistência ao extermínio dos Povos Indígenas, Negros e Afrodescendentes de Abya Yala. Declarando que a luta dos povos é articulada, diversa, continental, inclusiva e plural. Sendo considerados com urgência protagonistas em igualdade de direitos em qualquer processo ou projeto que afete as comunidades e territórios.

Criação de projetos e a implementação de ações diretas, políticas públicas, ações afirmativas e de reparação interculturais e interseccionais que garantam a distribuição justa e equitativa da riqueza, o acesso à saúde, à soberania alimentar, à água potável e de qualidade para que possamos viver em ambientes seguros e dignos.

Direito ao território é direito e eles reivindicam isso. “Todas as terras indígenas e territórios negros devem ser devolvidos aos seus legítimos donos. As terras devem ser devolvidas aos seus respectivos povos. Todas as comunidades negras e afrodescendentes devem ter livre titulação sobre as terras em que habitam. E livre acesso aos seus recursos naturais como praias, selvas, pântanos, bosques andinos, planícies, bacias, rios, glaciares, vales interandinos, pântanos em altura, lagos, pradarias, manguezais, baías, ladeiras, quebradas e terras não-cultivadas as quais não devem ser privatizadas nem exploradas de nenhuma forma”.

E reforçando que não pode existir justiça climática sem justiça racial. Entendendo que a justiça climática reconhece que a mudança climática tem impactos distintos de acordo às condições econômicas, sociais, raciais e de gênero. E que a justiça racial é um eixo fundamental na luta contra as desigualdades produto do sistema colonial, capitalista, extrativista e agroexportador.

Crise climática é crise de classes, diz ator britânico que aponta racismo no debate (Folha de S.Paulo)

www1.folha.uol.com.br

Na peça ‘Can I Live?’, Fehinti Balogun, com rap, animação e poesia, apresenta a colonização e a exploração de países africanos como temas centrais na discussão

Cristiane Fontes

2 de novembro de 2022


Foi em 2017, durante a preparação para a peça “Myth”, uma parábola climática da Royal Shakespeare Company, que o artista Fehinti Balogun acabou se dando conta da gravidade da crise do clima.

“Após ter feito muitas coisas, consegui meu primeiro papel principal numa peça no West End em Londres. Era o ano mais quente da história”, lembra o ator e dramaturgo britânico. “E, pela primeira vez, percebi que as plantações estavam morrendo, os campos estavam secos. Comecei a desenvolver uma espécie de ansiedade que nunca tive antes”, completa.

Com isso, veio o choque: “Eu tinha o trabalho que eu sempre sonhei, algo que eu tinha estudado para fazer, e, de repente, isso não significava nada”.

Balogun se juntou ao grupo ativista Extinction Rebellion, participou de diversos protestos e organizou uma palestra sobre o tema. Essa jornada o levou à produção de uma peça teatral que, durante a pandemia, foi transformada em um filme.

O ator britânico Fehinti Balogun, que criou a peça ‘Can I live?’, sobre mudanças climáticas. Fonte: New York Times/Tom Jamieson, 29.out.2021

Intitulada “Can I Live?” (posso viver?), a produção explica as mudanças climáticas a partir da perspectiva de uma pessoa negra, usando diversas performances musicais.

A mãe de Balogun, imigrante nigeriana, é quem guia a história. Fora da tela, também foi ela quem inspirou a criação do texto, a partir de questionamentos ao filho —que ele gravou secretamente para escutar de novo e pensar a respeito.

“Por que você está sacrificando sua carreira para fazer parte desses grupos?”, ela perguntava.

Mesmo discordando, o filho reconheceu na indignação da mãe um ponto muito importante: a discussão climática ficou elitizada e branca e ainda não foi capaz de incluir os segmentos mais pobres da população.

“Can I Live?”, pelo contrário, se propõe a não só trazer os dilemas pessoais do autor, que se misturam aos problemas mundiais e aos dados científicos, como é didática e criativa ao explicar, por exemplo, o efeito estufa em forma de rap. Criado com a companhia de teatro britânica Complicité, o filme mescla linguagens como animação, poesia e música.

“O objetivo é criticar descaradamente o sistema, sem culpar uma pessoa específica. Não se trata de envergonhar as pessoas, mas, sim, de educá-las e conectar-se com elas”, define Balogun.

Depois de uma turnê online, o filme foi exibido em eventos como a COP26 (conferência da ONU sobre mudanças climáticas realizada em 2021 na Escócia) e a London Climate Action Week.

A ideia, diz Balogun, é fazer “Can I Live?”, que ainda não foi lançado no Brasil, chegar a movimentos de base, para estimular conversas sobre a crise climática entre aqueles que não costumam se conectar com o assunto.

Quando perguntado sobre a agenda climática no Reino Unido, o autor é categórico: “Temos um governo que não está levando isso tão a sério quanto deveria e que nunca levou o racismo tão a sério quanto deveria. Temos toda uma economia baseada num histórico de escravidão que não é debatida. Então, dentro das escolas, apagamos essa história. O que aprendemos neste país não está nem perto do que deveria ser”.

Quando e por que você se envolveu com a agenda da crise climática?

Após ter feito muitas coisas, consegui meu primeiro papel principal numa peça no West End em Londres. Era o ano mais quente da história, depois de outro ano ter sido o ano mais quente da história, depois de o último antes disso ter sido o mais quente… E, pela primeira vez, eu percebi que as plantações estavam morrendo, os campos estavam secos. Comecei a desenvolver uma espécie de ansiedade que nunca tive antes. Eu tinha o trabalho que eu sempre sonhei, algo que eu tinha estudado para fazer, e, de repente, isso não significava nada.

Então comecei a tentar me envolver em diferentes projetos e me juntei ao [grupo ativista] Extinction Rebellion. E comecei a discutir tudo com minha mãe, que perguntava: “Por que você está sacrificando sua carreira para fazer parte desses grupos?”. E eu pensava: “Não, essa é a única coisa importante que estou fazendo”. E nós continuamos discutindo muito isso tudo.

Eu gravei secretamente tudo o que ela me disse, peguei os pontos importantes dela e transformei numa apresentação sobre o clima, porque percebi que meu papel era poder usar meu privilégio de ser um ator e ter essa formação.

Eu não sou de uma família particularmente rica. Cresci sem muito dinheiro, morando em habitação social, e o que eu tenho agora é devido ao meu trabalho como ator, aos meus contatos e a todas essas perspectivas diferentes. Então eu montei essa palestra, que é como um TED Talk, usando as mensagens de voz da minha mãe.

Esse trabalho decolou, uma coisa levou à outra e começamos a trabalhar em uma peça, que depois virou um filme, “Can I Live?”. Foi assim que essa jornada climática de repente tomou conta da minha vida.

Sua mãe é a verdadeira estrela do filme. Quais foram as coisas importantes que ela levantou sobre o assunto?

Muitas. Uma delas é exatamente o que significa resistir quando você é uma minoria, e o que significa para a sua criação. Isso afeta não apenas o seu futuro, mas também a ideia que foi passada a pessoas como minha mãe, minhas tias, meus tios sobre o que é o “bom imigrante”.

Não é algo que ela tenha me dito explicitamente, mas que eu intuí de tudo o que ela estava me dizendo. Você não é capaz de reagir porque tem sorte de ter o que tem, entende? Ela dizia: “Há pessoas que estão esperando para entrar no país. Há pessoas que estão esperando conseguir a cidadania. E você acha que eles vão criticar aquele país que diz que eles não deveriam estar lá?”.

Para o público no Brasil que ainda não teve a chance de assistir ao filme, como você o descreveria?

Basicamente, o filme é uma explicação das mudanças climáticas a partir da perspectiva de uma pessoa negra. O objetivo é criticar descaradamente o sistema, sem culpar uma pessoa específica. Não se trata de envergonhar as pessoas, mas, sim, de educá-las e conectar-se com elas.

Eu quero que as pessoas assistam e vejam a si mesmas no filme todo ou em algumas partes, ou que vejam sua mãe ou sua avó ou seus amigos nas conversas. O filme tinha como objetivo levar as pessoas por essa jornada histórica até onde estamos agora e descobrirem o que podem fazer.

Colocamos o filme para distribuição online durante a pandemia. As pessoas pagavam o que podiam. A ideia era tentar torná-lo o mais acessível possível. Não foi algo como: “Ei, nós fizemos uma obra de arte!”, mas ela é exibida num teatro muito metido onde as pessoas se sentem desconfortáveis e têm dificuldades para acessar.

A ideia foi descentralizar esta obra e distribuí-la para o maior número de pessoas possível, e oferecê-la a movimentos de base, para que pudessem exibi-lo e conversar a partir disso e incluir nessas conversas pessoas que não costumavam se conectar.

A propósito, como envolver nas questões climáticas pessoas que estão lutando para sobreviver?

Acho que a coisa mais importante que aprendi sobre me comunicar com as pessoas é que você precisa ir ao encontro delas. Você não pode chegar em alguém esperando que essa pessoa tenha o seu mesmo nível de entusiasmo ou raiva, ou desgosto, ou desdém, porque todo mundo tem algo acontecendo em suas vidas.

O que temos no sistema é que constantemente nos dizem que temos que consertar algo individualmente, e que é nossa culpa individual. O fato de você estar passando por tanta insegurança alimentar é porque você não trabalhou duro o suficiente, ou porque 20 anos atrás você não economizou isso, ou fez aquilo. E se você tivesse feito todas essas coisas, você estaria bem e a culpa é sua e blá, blá, blá.

Você tem de olhar para essa questão de um ponto de vista estrutural. Estrutural e espiritual. Eu posso despejar todas as minhas ideias sobre estrutura e coisas de ativismo em cima de você, mas, no final das contas, se seu prato está cheio, seu prato está cheio; você já chegou no seu limite. A questão é muito mais profunda, e é muito solitário e difícil saber que você tem muitos problemas que precisa consertar. No final, o que está mesmo no centro disso é ter uma comunidade.

E como você descreveria o debate sobre mudanças climáticas no Reino Unido no momento?

Essa é uma pergunta difícil! Agora no Reino Unido temos um governo que não está levando isso tão a sério quanto deveria e que nunca levou o racismo tão a sério quanto deveria.

Temos toda uma economia baseada num histórico de escravidão que não é debatida. Então, dentro das escolas, apagamos essa história. O que aprendemos neste país não está nem perto do que deveria ser, na verdade. Mas, se estivermos falando de pensamentos e sentimentos em relação às mudanças climáticas, as pessoas sabem disso, embora não saibam o que fazer.

Na COP26, no ano passado, você participou de eventos com artistas e ativistas indígenas brasileiros. Como o discurso deles ecoou com você e no Reino Unido?

A COP é um evento decepcionante, via de regra. Não me inspirou nem um pouco. O que foi inspirador foram todos os ativistas que estavam lá e pessoas diferentes de muitos países diferentes, fazendo coisas incríveis e falando sobre tantas coisas. É uma comunidade muito forte.

Mas é muito difícil no Reino Unido. O patriotismo está apenas conectado a um ponto de vista ideológico e imperialista do mundo, que diz: “Eu sou superior a você”. Então por que aprender com aquele ativista brasileiro diferente? Já os indígenas eram o oposto disso. A mensagem deles era: “Estes somos nós! E vamos compartilhar isso com vocês! Vamos proteger isso para as gerações futuras!”.

Na sua visão, como fortalecer o movimento global de justiça climática, considerando o atual contexto político?

Parte do movimento dos direitos civis estava ligado à educação, à educação em massa e para certas comunidades. A ideia não é trabalhar com o medo, mas sim trabalhar através do medo para chegar a soluções.

Então, para fortalecer o movimento, [precisamos de] educação em massa, especificamente em certas zonas; e precisamos que diferentes movimentos de base se unam.

Em termos de mudança na narrativa, quais são as estratégias que você considera mais importantes?

Precisamos mudar a narrativa sobre riqueza e propriedade. Nós realmente precisamos entender que a crise climática é uma crise de classes, e dentro dessa crise de classes, há uma interseccionalidade muito racista.

Simplesmente entender essas coisas eu acho que vai ajudar muito; e é muito difícil, porque dentro do ideal capitalista, [a economia] só funciona se você sentir falta de alguma coisa. Eles só podem vender maquiagem para você se você acreditar que precisa de maquiagem. Eu não estou dizendo que as pessoas não devem usar maquiagem, mas, sim, que você só vai comprar algo se achar que precisa daquilo.

São essas mudanças de narrativas sobre o que achamos que é necessário e o que é, na verdade, necessário.

E precisamos de bondade radical. Radical no sentido de que não somos uma cultura muito indulgente.

O debate político anda muito polarizado, inclusive no Brasil, como você deve saber. Você poderia descrever melhor a ideia de bondade radical?

O que quero dizer com bondade radical não é apenas ser radicalmente gentil com a pessoa com opiniões opostas, mas também ser radicalmente gentil consigo mesmo.

Por que estou tentando fazer com que alguém que, fundamentalmente, me odeia goste de mim? Como isso me ajuda ou ajuda a outra pessoa? No final das contas, independentemente de eles terem dito que gostavam ou não de mim, eles vão embora e eu fico com esse sentimento. A única maneira de lidar com isso é ter uma comunidade atrás de você que esteja disposta a compartilhar isso com você.

Você sabe o que isso significa? Significa se afastar da postura individual de “eu vou consertar o mundo” para algo como “estas são as pessoas que eu preciso para poder fazer isso”.

Eu sempre falo, você tem que fazer uma escolha quando você fala com alguém, especialmente com alguém com uma opinião oposta a você que não tem interesse direto no assunto, como por exemplo, racismo, sexismo, ou mesmo mudanças climáticas.

Quando a pessoa não é afetada emocional, física e praticamente pela coisa e argumenta contra você, você tem que se perguntar: “Eu tenho condições de me envolver nisso hoje? Até onde quero ir? Vou ter alguém cuidando de mim quando a conversa terminar?”. Então a bondade radical não é apenas ter um espaço para a outra pessoa: é para você mesmo.


Raio-X

Fehinti Balogun

Ator, dramaturgo, escritor e pintor britânico de origem nigeriana, nascido em Greenwich, em Londres. Além de “Can I Live?”, participou de peças como “Myth” (mito), “The Importance of Being Earnest” (a importância de ser prudente) e “Whose Planet Are You On?” (você está no planeta de quem?). No cinema, fez trabalhos como “Juliet, Nua e Crua”, “Duna” e “Walden”. Na TV, participou das séries “I May Destroy You” (posso te destruir), “Informer” (informante) e “O Filho Bastardo do Diabo”, cuja primeira temporada estreia no fim de outubro na Netflix no Brasil.

Análise: Com ‘mutirão’ na COP, Lula abre primeiro governo climático do Brasil (Folha de S.Paulo)

www1.folha.uol.com.br

Mudanças sociais e globais levam terceiro mandato a ver na política do clima uma oportunidade para novas alianças e reformas programáticas

Mathias Alencastro

1 de novembro de 2022


A ascensão da COP do Egito a primeiro palco da nova diplomacia do governo eleito se deve a duas dinâmicas interdependentes. A eleição de Lula encerra um ano terrível, porém transformador, para a política climática.

Por um lado, a Guerra da Ucrânia deu ímpeto às indústrias fósseis, que atravessavam um raro período de declínio, enquanto as divisões crescentes entre o Ocidente e o Oriente, mas também entre o Norte e o Sul Global, agravaram a crise da governança climática.

Por outro, a transição energética se tornou uma questão de segurança nacional para os países desenvolvidos, com implicações extraordinárias para a diplomacia e os investimentos internacionais.

Em seguida, a sociedade civil brasileira se fortaleceu através da emergência de uma geração de cientistas, ativistas e políticos de excelência e da multiplicação de organizações que estabeleceram a relação entre democracia, clima e justiça social. Essas mudanças tornaram inevitável a metamorfose do terceiro mandato de Lula em primeiro governo climático do Brasil.

Na América Latina, a onda rosa tem sido quase sempre acompanhada por uma onda verde. A plataforma climática do chileno Gabriel Boric era uma exigência do movimento de contestação popular, enquanto a do colombiano Gustavo Petro veio junto com a renovação da esquerda depois do acordo de paz.

O caso brasileiro, todavia, é excepcional, porque a política climática transformou de fora para dentro o Partido dos Trabalhadores, que tem na luta sindical e nacionalista das energias fósseis uma das suas principais referências históricas. O PT segue o caminho de outros partidos de centro-esquerda que viram na política climática uma oportunidade para novas alianças e reformas programáticas.

Em agosto deste ano, o governo de Joe Biden foi salvo pelos ativistas climáticos que obrigaram o Senado a aprovar um novo pacote econômico. O governo de coalizão do social-democrata Olaf Scholz depende mais do que nunca do seu vice Robert Habeck, o líder dos Verdes.

Se a COP27 virar um mutirão de lideranças brasileiras, ela será o palco de Lula e de toda a frente ampla que derrotou a extrema direita.

Além dos símbolos e dos discursos, o governo Lula será avaliado pela sua capacidade de superar o enfrentamento com os movimentos populistas que acomete tantas outras democracias.

A política climática do governo de Emmanuel Macron jamais se reergueu do choque provocado pelos coletes amarelos, um protesto desencadeado por causa de uma taxa de carbono.

Na Europa e nos Estados Unidos, os oportunistas que encabeçaram os movimentos antivacinas se converteram em expoentes dos protestos contra a alta dos preços de energia. O próprio movimento de caminhoneiros golpistas a favor de Jair Bolsonaro também é uma manifestação da hiperdependência do Brasil do sistema rodoviário e da indústria de carbono.

A partir de agora, toda a política é política climática.

O projeto Planeta em Transe é apoiado pela Open Society Foundations.