Arquivo da tag: Grandes obras

The end of a People: Amazon dam destroys sacred Munduruku “Heaven” (Mongabay)

5 January 2017 / Sue Branford and Maurício Torres

Brazil dynamited an indigenous sacred site, the equivalent of Christian “Heaven,” to make way for Teles Pires dam; desecration is devastating to Munduruku culture.

The end of a People: Amazon dam destroys sacred Munduruku “Heaven”

  • Four dams are being built on the Teles Pires River — a major tributary of the Tapajós River — to provide Brazil with hydropower, and to possibly be a first step toward constructing an industrial waterway to transport soy and other commodities from Mato Grosso state, in the interior, to the Atlantic coast.
  • Those dams are being built largely without consultation with impacted indigenous people, as required by the International Labor Organization’s Convention 169, an agreement which Brazil signed.
  • A sacred rapid, known as Sete Quedas, the Munduruku “Heaven”, was dynamited in 2013 to build the Teles Pires dam. A cache of sacred artefacts was also seized by the dam construction consortium and the Brazilian state.
  • The Indians see both events as callous attacks on their sacred sites, and say that these desecrations will result in the destruction of the Munduruku as a people — 13,000 Munduruku Indians live in 112 villages, mainly along the upper reaches of the Tapajós River and its tributaries in the heart of the Amazon.

(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil after January 10, 2017)

The Tapajós River Basin lies at the heart of the Amazon, and at the heart of an exploding controversy: whether to build 40+ large dams, a railway, and highways, turning the Basin into a vast industrialized commodities export corridor; or to curb this development impulse and conserve one of the most biologically and culturally rich regions on the planet. 

Those struggling to shape the Basin’s fate hold conflicting opinions, but because the Tapajós is an isolated region, few of these views get aired in the media. Journalist Sue Branford and social scientist Mauricio Torres travelled there recently for Mongabay, and over coming weeks hope to shed some light on the heated debate that will shape the future of the Amazon. 

“It is a time of death. The Munduruku will start dying. They will have accidents. Even simple accidents will lead to death. Lightning will strike and kill an Indian. A branch will fall from a tree and kill an Indian. It’s not chance. It’s all because the government interfered with a sacred site,” says Valmira Krixi Biwūn with authority.

Valmira Krixi Munduruku, as she was baptized, is an indigenous Munduruku woman warrior living in the village of Teles Pires beside the river of the same name on the border between the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Pará. A leader and a sage, she speaks with great confidence about a variety of subjects ranging from the old stories of her people, to the plant-based concoctions in which young girls must bathe in order to transform into warriors.

The sacred site she speaks about is a stretch of rapids known as Sete Quedas located on the Teles Pires River. In 2013, the consortium responsible for the construction of a large hydroelectric power station obtained judicial authorization to dynamite the rapids to make way for the Teles Pires dam.

Rapids on the Teles Pires River. The cultural impacts of the destruction of Sete Quedas, a sacred site comparable to the Christian “Heaven” continues to reverberate throughout Munduruku society. Future dams and reservoirs are planned that will likely impact other sacred indigenous sacred sites. Photo by Thais Borges
Rapids on the Teles Pires River. The cultural impacts of the destruction of Sete Quedas, a sacred site comparable to the Christian “Heaven” continue to reverberate throughout Munduruku society. Future dams and reservoirs are planned that will likely impact other sacred indigenous sacred sites. Photo by Thais Borges
The Teles Pires hydroelectric dam under construction. Photo courtesy of Brent Millikan / International Rivers. Photo by Thais Borges
The Teles Pires hydroelectric dam under construction. Photo courtesy of Brent Millikan / International Rivers. Photo by Brent Millikan

In 2013 the companies involved blew up Sete Quedas, and in so doing also destroyed — in the cosmology of the region’s indigenous people — the equivalent of the Christian “Heaven”, the sacred sanctuary inhabited by spirits after death. Known in as Paribixexe, Sete Quedas is a sacred site for all the Munduruku.

Dynamiting Heaven

The destruction of the sacred rapids was a lethal blow for the Indians: “The dynamiting of the sacred site is the end of religion and the end of culture. It is the end of the Munduruku people. When they dynamited the waterfall, they dynamited the Mother of the Fish and the Mother of the Animals we hunt. So these fish and these animals will die. All that we are involved with will die. So this is the end of the Munduruku”, says a mournful indigenous elder, Eurico Krixi Munduruku.

The message Valmira Krixi delivers is equally chilling: “We will come to an end, and our spirits too.” It is double annihilation, in life and in death.

In all, today, more than 13,000 Munduruku Indians live in 112 villages, mainly along the upper reaches of the Tapajós River and its tributaries, including the Teles Pires River. This indigenous group once occupied and completely dominated such an extensive Amazonian region that “in colonial Brazil the whole of the Tapajós River Basin was known by the Europeans as Mundurukânia”, explains Bruna Rocha, a lecturer in archaeology at the Federal University of the West of Pará.

A traditional Munduruku dance. Photo by Thais Borges
A traditional Munduruku dance. Photo by Thais Borges
Valmira Krixi Munduruku: “It is a time of death. The Munduruku will start dying. They will have accidents. Even simple accidents will lead to death.… It’s not chance. It’s all because the government interfered with a sacred site.” Photo by Mauricio Torres
Valmira Krixi Munduruku: “It is a time of death. The Munduruku will start dying. They will have accidents. Even simple accidents will lead to death.… It’s not chance. It’s all because the government interfered with a sacred site.” Photo by Thais Borges

The sudden appearance of rubber-tapping across Amazonia during the second half of the 19th century shattered the power of “Mundurukânia,” and deprived the Munduruku of most of their territory. “They just kept fragments in the lower Tapajós and larger areas in the upper reaches of the river, but even so it was only a fraction of what they occupied in the past”, says Rocha.

Now even these fragments are being seriously impacted by the hydroelectric power stations being built around them. Of the more than 40 dams proposed in the Tapajós Basin, four are already under construction or completed on the Teles Pires River. These dams are all key to a proposed industrial waterway that would transport soy from Mato Grosso state, north along the Teles Pires and Tapajós rivers, then east along the Amazon to the coast for export.

The time before

The 90 families in Teles Pires village, which we visited, love talking about the past, a time, they say, when they could roam at will through their immense territory to hunt and harvest from the forest. In part, these nostalgic recollections are mythical in that, for at least two centuries and probably longer, the people have lived in fixed communities. But they continue to collect many products from the forest — seeds, tree bark, fibers, timber, fruit and more; using the materials to build their houses, to feed themselves, to make spears for hunting, to concoct herbal remedies, and so on.

Their territory ­— the Indigenous Territory of Kayabi, which they share, not always happily, with the Apiaká and Kayabi people — was created in 2004. Bizarrely, the sacred site of Sete Quedas lay just outside its legal limits, an oversight that was to have tragic consequences for the Indians.

Over the centuries, the Munduruku have adapted well to changes in the world around them, changes that intensified after they made contact with white society in the 18th century. On some occasions, the people readily incorporated new technological and social elements into their culture, seizing on their advantages. The British Museum has a “very traditional” Munduruku waistband, probably created in the late 19th century, which utilizes cotton fabric imported from Europe. The Indians clearly realized that cotton fabric was far more resilient than the textiles they made from forest products, and they happily incorporated the cotton into the decorative garment.

Munduruku warriors. A proud indigenous group today numbering 13,000, the Munduuku are making a defiant stand against the Brazilian government’s plan to build dozens of dams on the Tapajós River and its tributaries. Photo by Mauricio Torres
Munduruku warriors. A proud indigenous society, today numbering 13,000, the Munduuku are making a defiant stand against the Brazilian government’s plan to build dozens of dams on the Tapajós River and its tributaries. Photo by Mauricio Torres

Today that custom continues. Almost all young people have mobile phones, and appreciate their usefulness. But at times the Munduruku have found, just as many of us do in our city lives, that modern technology can go wrong, with frustrating results. The Munduruku have, for example, installed an artesian well in Teles Pires village and now have running water in their houses. That advance makes life easier, except when the system breaks down, which is not infrequent. During the four days of our visit, for instance, there was no water, as the pump had quit working.

In similar fashion, their religion has also changed, at least superficially. Franciscan friars have had a mission (Missão Cururu) in the heart of Munduruku territory for over a century, and Catholicism has left its mark. The Munduruku say, for instance, that the creator of the world, the warrior Karosakaybu, fashioned everyone and everything “in his own image”, a direct quote from the Bible.

Even so, the Indians have a strong ethnic identity, which they fiercely protect. When we asked to film them, they said yes, but many insisted on speaking their own language on camera, even though they often could speak Portuguese far better than our translator.

Moreover, their cosmology is rock-solid; every Indian to whom we spoke shared Krixi Biwūn’s belief in the hereafter and the paramount importance of the sacred sites in guaranteeing their life after death. This faith forms the foundation of their cosmology, and is essential to their existence. It is this fundamental belief that has now been blasted — making adaptation almost impossible.

Eurico Krixi Munduruku: “When they dynamited the waterfall, they dynamited the Mother of the Fish and the Mother of the Animals we hunt. So these fish and these animals will die. All that we are involved with will die. So this is the end of the Munduruku.” Photo by Mauricio Torres
Eurico Krixi Munduruku: “When they dynamited the waterfall, they dynamited the Mother of the Fish and the Mother of the Animals we hunt. So these fish and these animals will die. All that we are involved with will die. So this is the end of the Munduruku.” Photo by Mauricio Torres

The dams the people didn’t want

National governments are obliged to directly consult with indigenous groups before launching any project that will affect their wellbeing, according to The International Labor Organization’s Convention 169. Brazil is a signatory of this agreement, so how is it possible that indigenous sacred sites could be demolished on the Teles Pires River to make way for Amazon dams?

The answer is clear-cut, according to Brent Millikan, Amazon Program Director for International Rivers. After the 2011 approval for the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam on the Xingu River — a major Amazon tributary —, the government’s next hydroelectric target in Amazonia was on the Teles Pires River. “Four dams are being simultaneously built [there]. Two are close to indigenous people — the Teles Pires and Sāo Manoel. The São Manoel is 300 meters from the federally demarcated border of an indigenous reserve where the Munduruku, Kayabi and Apiaká live,” Millikan told Mongabay. The sacred site of Sete Quedas, left outside the boundary of the indigenous territory, lay in the way of the São Manoel dam.

Map showing the reservoirs created by the Teles Pires River dams and their encroachment on indigenous lands. Map by Mauricio Torres
Map showing the reservoirs created by the Teles Pires River dams and their encroachment on indigenous lands. Map by Mauricio Torres

Unlike the building of the Belo Monte mega-dam, which was extensively covered by the Brazilian and international press, the Teles Pires “projects were ignored”, Millikan says. “This was due to various factors — their geographic isolation, the fact that they were less ‘grandiose’ than Belo Monte, and that there was very little involvement from civil society groups, who generally help threatened [indigenous] groups.”

Even so, the government carried out a form of consultation with the indigenous population and other local inhabitants. On 6 October 2010, it announced in the official gazette that it had received the environmental impact study for the Teles Pires dam from the environmental agency, Ibama, and that the public had 45 days in which to request an audiência pública (public hearing) in which to raise questions about the dam.

A hearing was, in fact, held on 23 November 2010 in the town of Jacareacanga. Although the event was organised in a very formal way, alien to indigenous culture, contributions from 24 people, almost all indigenous, were permitted. According to the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), an independent body of federal prosecutors within the Brazilian state, every speaker expressed opposition to the dam. Even so, the project went ahead. Over time, the Munduruku became increasingly reluctant to take part in these consultations, saying that their views were simply ignored.

Although the Munduruku were always opposed to the dams, they were ill prepared for the scale of the damage they have suffered.

Cacique Disma Muõ told us: “The government didn’t inform us. The government always spoke of the good things that would happen. They didn’t tell us about the bad things.” When they protested, the Munduruku were told: “The land belongs to the government, not to the Indians. There is no way the Indians can prevent the dams.”

This is, at best, a half-truth. Although indigenous land belongs to the Brazilian state, the indigenous people have the right to the “exclusive” and “perpetual” use of this land, in accordance with the Brazilian Constitution.

Cacique Disma Muõ: “The government didn’t inform us. The government always spoke of the good things that would happen. They didn’t tell us about the bad things.” Photo by Mauricio Torres
Cacique Disma Muõ: “The government didn’t inform us. The government always spoke of the good things that would happen. They didn’t tell us about the bad things.” Photo by Mauricio Torres

Moreover, the ILO’s Convention 169 says that indigenous groups must be consulted if they will suffer an impact, even if the cause of the impact is located beyond their land. Rodrigo Oliveiraan adviser in Santarém to the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) made this clear in an interview with Mongabay: “As it was evident before the dams were licensed that the Munduruku and other communities would be affected, the Brazilian government had the obligation to consult these groups in a full and informed way in accordance with the ILO’s Convention 169.”

The Brazilian government repeatedly claimed that its public hearings amounted to the “full, informed and prior” consultation required by the ILO, but the MPF challenged this assertion. It sued the Brazilian government, and the federal courts on several occasions stopped work on the dam. However, unfortunately for the Munduruku and other local indigenous groups, each time the MPF won in a lower court, the powerful interests of the energy sector — both within government and outside it — had the decision overturned in a higher court.

This was largely possible because the Workers’ Party government (which ruled from 2003-16) had revived a legal instrument known as Suspensão de Segurança (Suspension of Security), which was instituted and widely used by Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964-85). Suspension of Security allows any judicial decision, even when based on sound legal principles, to be reversed in a higher court without further legal argument, using a trump card that simply invokes “national security”, “public order” or the “national economy”.

The Prosecutor Luís de Camões Lima Boaventura told Mongabay: “Figures collected by the MPF show that, just with respect to the hydroelectric dams in the Teles Pires-Tapajós Basin, we were victorious in 80 percent of the actions we took, but all of the rulings in our favor were reversed by suspensions.”

Marcelo Munduruku: “The ethnocide continues, in the way people look at us, the way they want us to be like them, subjugating our organizations, the way they tell us that our religion isn’t worth anything, that theirs is what matters, the way they tell us our behavior is wrong. They are obliterating the identity of the Indian as a human being.” Photo by Thais Borges
Marcelo Munduruku: “The ethnocide continues, in the way people look at us, the way they want us to be like them, subjugating our organizations, the way they tell us that our religion isn’t worth anything, that theirs is what matters, the way they tell us our behavior is wrong. They are obliterating the identity of the Indian as a human being.” Photo by Thais Borges

According to Prosecutor Boaventura, the root of the problem is that the Brazilian authorities have always adopted a colonial mentality towards the Amazon: “I would say that Amazonia hasn’t been seen as a territory to be conquered. Rather, it’s been seen as a territory to be plundered. Predation is the norm.”

Instead of democratically engaging the Munduruku, and debating the various options for the future of the Tapajós region, federal authorities imposed the dams, without discussion. The Teles Pires dam was built in record time — 41 months — and is already operating. According to a recent press interview, the São Manoel dam, due to come on stream in May 2018, is also on course to be completed ahead of schedule.

Almost every week now, local indigenous villages feel another impact from the large construction projects. The Indians say that the building of the São Manoel dam made the river dirty, more silted and turbid. Although their claims may be exaggerated, there seems little doubt that aquatic life will suffer serious, long-term harm. This is serious for a people whose diet largely consists of fish.

In November, crisis came in the form of an oil spill on the river, possibly originating at the dam construction site, an event that deprived some villages of drinking water.

“We will have to pay the price”

The destruction of the sacred Sete Quedas rapids was not the only blow inflicted on the Munduruku by the consortium building the Sao Manoel dam. Workers also withdrew 12 funeral urns and archaeological artefacts from a nearby site, a violation of sacred tradition that has done further spiritual harm. The Munduruku cacique, or leader, Disma Mou, who is also a shaman, explains: “We kept arrows, clubs, ceramics, there, all buried under the ground in urns, all sacred. Many were war trophies, placed there when we were at war, travelling from region to region. Our ancestors chose this place to be sacred and now it is being destroyed by the dam.”

A creek flowing into the Teles Pires River. With the building of more than 40 dams in the region, these small waterways will be drowned, destroying fishing grounds and vastly altering ecosystems. Photo by Thais Borges
A creek flowing into the Teles Pires River. With the building of more than 40 dams in the region, these small waterways will be drowned, destroying fishing grounds and vastly altering ecosystems. Photo by Thais Borges

Francisco Pugliese, an archaeologist from the University of São Paulo, told Mongabay that he had been horrified by the behavior of the National Institute of Historic and Artistic Heritage (Iphan), the body in charge of the protection of archaeological sites. He said that the institute had broken the law by exempting the hydroelectric company from the obligation to work with the Munduruku to determine the best way of protecting their sacred site. Worse, Iphan had decided that, as the urns and other material were discovered outside the boundary of the indigenous reserve, they were the property of the government and should be sent to a museum.

“Imagine what it’s like for a traditional people to see its ancestors taken to a place with which it has no emotional link or even knows”, he said. “It’s within this perverse logic of dispossession that archaeological research takes place, in the context of the implementation of the dam. It exacerbates the process of expropriation and the destruction of the cultural references of the people and it reinforces the process of genocide of the original inhabitants of the Amazon basin”, he concluded. Mongabay requested an interview with Iphan but was not granted one.

The elder Eurico Krixi Munduruku finds it painful to describe what this sacrilege means for the people: “Those urns should never have been touched. And it’s not the white man who will pay for this. It is us, the living Munduruku, who will have to pay, in the form of accidents, in the form of death…. Our ancestors left them there for us to protect. It was our duty and we have failed. And now we, the Munduruku, will have to pay the price.”

The harm done to the Munduruku psyche by these desecrations hit home in the aftermath of a 2012 federal police operation known as Operação Eldorado, during which an Indian was killed. Krixi Biwun, the sister of the dead man, told us of her brother’s restless spirit: “He went to Sete Quedas because, when people die, that is where our ancestors take them so they can live there. But now Sete Quedas is destroyed and he is suffering.”

“The ethnocide continues”

Is there a way forward for the Munduruku people, a way that the perceived blasphemy done by the consortium and federal government can be reversed? Everyone we talked to in the village is certain that, as long as the urns and other artefacts rest outside the sacred site, one catastrophe will follow another; even small wounds will cause death.

But it is not simply a case of returning the urns to the Indians so they can rebury them. “They can’t give the urns back to us”, explains Krixi Biwun. “We can’t touch them. They have to find a way of getting them returned to a sacred place [without us].”

This seems unlikely to happen. The urns are currently held by the Teles Pires company in the town of Alta Floresta, waiting to be taken to a museum at the request of Iphan. Mongabay asked to see the artefacts but our request was turned down.

Munduruku Indians outside the Teles Pires company gate where the Munduruku sacred relics have been stored by the dam construction consortium. Photo by Thais Borges
Munduruku Indians outside the Teles Pires company gate where the Munduruku sacred relics have been stored by the dam construction consortium. Photo by Thais Borges

Even if the holy relics were eventually returned to a sacred place in one of the rapids along the Teles Pires River, that respite is likely to be short-lived. The next step in the opening up of the region to agribusiness and mining is to turn the Teles Pires into an industrial waterway, transforming it with dams, reservoirs, canals and locks. This will mean the destruction of all the river’s rapids, leaving no sacred sites.

The indefatigable MPF has carried on fighting. In December, it won another court victory, with a judge ruling that the license for the installation of the Teles Pires dam — granted by the environmental agency, Ibama — was invalid, given the failure to consult the Indians.

Once again, however, this court order is likely to be reversed by a higher court using the “Suspension of Security” instrument. Indeed, no judicial decision regarding the dams will likely be respected by the government until the case is judged by the Supreme Federal Tribunal, which will probably take decades. In practical terms, what the Tribunal decides will be irrelevant, for the Teles Pires dam is already operational and the São Manoel dam will come on stream later this year.

The Indians are outraged by the lack of respect with which they are being treated. A statement issued jointly by the Munduruku, Kayabi and Apiaká in 2011, and quoted in the book-length report, Ocekadi, asks: “What would the white man say if we built our villages on the top of his buildings, his holy places and his cemeteries?” It is, the Munduruku say, the equivalent of razing St. Peters in Rome to construct a nuclear power plant, or digging up your grandmother’s grave to build a parking lot.

The researcher, Rosamaria Loures, who has been studying the Munduruku’s opposition to the hydroelectric projects, told Mongabay that their experience reveals one of the weaknesses of Brazilian society: “The Nation-State has established a hierarchy of values based on criteria like class, color and ethnic origin. In this categorization, certain groups ‘count less’ and can be simply crushed,” she explains.

A Munduruku Indian, Marcelo, who we spoke to within an indigenous territory near the town of Juara, expressed the same notion in the graphic terms of someone who experiences discrimination every day of his life:

“The ethnocide continues, in the way people look at us, the way they want us to be like them, subjugating our organizations, the way they tell us that our religion isn’t worth anything, that theirs is what matters, the way they tell us our behavior is wrong. They are obliterating the identity of the Indian as a human being.”

 

(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read Mongabay’s series on the Tapajós Basin in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil after January 10, 2017)

The recently built Miritituba soy processing port on the Tapajós River. It was financed and constructed by Brazilian and international commodities traders in anticipation of the approval by the Brazilian Congress of a vast industrial waterway, new paved highways and a railroad. If that construction goes forward, it will cause major deforestation and ecological damage to the Tapajós Basin, while also impoverishing indigenous cultures. Photo by Thais Borges
The recently built Miritituba soy processing port on the Tapajós River. It was financed and constructed by Brazilian and international commodities traders in anticipation of the approval by the Brazilian Congress of a vast industrial waterway, new paved highways and a railroad. If that construction goes forward, it will cause major deforestation and ecological damage to the Tapajós Basin, while also impoverishing indigenous cultures. Photo by Walter Guimarães
Anúncios

Ibama concede licença e Belo Monte pode começar a operar (Greenpeace)

25/11/2015

Obras do canteiro da hidrelétrica de Belo Monte, em março de 2015. Foto: Greenpeace/Fábio Nascimento

Apesar de todos os impactos socioambientais causados por Belo Monte até agora e de grande parte das condicionantes estipuladas no licenciamento não terem sido cumpridas, o Ibama concedeu, nesta terça-feira, dia 24, a licença de operação permitindo que a Norte Energia, empresa responsável pela construção da hidrelétrica, inicie o enchimento do reservatório da usina.

Em Brasília, um grupo de cerca de 70 índios do Xingu protestou contra a decisão do Ibama, durante a coletiva de imprensa com a presidente do órgão, Marilene Ramos, organizada para anunciar a licença.

“Belo Monte não tem e nem nunca teve viabilidade ambiental. A Licença de Operação agora concedida apenas coroa um processo de licenciamento questionável, baseado na pressão do setor elétrico para que o projeto seja realizado a qualquer custo. Infelizmente esse fato evidencia que o licenciamento ambiental hoje no Brasil funciona como um jogo de cartas marcadas para viabilizar uma decisão política já tomada previamente, que subestima o gigantismo dos impactos socioambientais causados na região”, afirma Danicley de Aguiar, da Campanha da Amazônia do Greenpeace.

Em junho, um levantamento batizado de “Dossiê Belo Monte – Não há condições para a Licença de Operação”, publicado pelo Instituto Socioambiental (ISA) apontou sérias consequências resultantes do não cumprimento de grande parte das condicionantes. Entre os principais impactos estão o aumento da exploração ilegal de madeira, a inviabilização do modo de vida ribeirinho e indígena, a destruição da atividade pesqueira da região e um atropelado do processo de reassentamento compulsório de populações urbanas e rurais. (Greenpeace Brasil/ #Envolverde)

* Publicado originalmente no site Greenpeace Brasil.

*   *   *

Após multa de R$ 5 milhões, Belo Monte terá licença (O Globo)

Balsa no Rio Xingu transporta materiais para construção de dique da Belo Monte: projeto previa que, quando a usina entrasse em operação, as condicionantes socioambientais já deveriam estar resolvidas – Dado Galdieri / Bloomberg

Danilo Farelo, 24/11/2015

BRASÍLIA – Mesmo com o descumprimento de uma série de condicionantes ambientais pela Norte Energia, empresa responsável pela hidrelétrica no Rio Xingu (PA), o Ibama vai publicar nos próximos dias a licença de operação da usina de Belo Monte. Com isso, a empresa terá aval para encher o reservatório e começar a gerar energia, o que deve ocorrer a partir de fevereiro. A permissão foi precedida de um auto de infração de R$ 5,087 milhões aplicado na sexta-feira à Norte Energia pelo descumprimento de condicionantes previstas na licença anterior, que permitiu a construção da obra.

No dia 12 de novembro, em ofício enviado ao Ibama dando anuência para a emissão da licença, a Fundação Nacional do Índio (Funai) destacou uma série de condicionantes descumpridas pela Norte Energia. Mas, para assegurar que, mesmo com a usina em operação, a batalha pelos indígenas continuará, o presidente da Funai, João Pedro Gonçalves da Costa, assinou com a Norte Energia no mesmo dia 12 um termo de cooperação, no qual a empresa se compromete a cumprir as exigência que ficaram pelo caminho.

PRAZO DE 90 DIAS

Segundo o termo, ao qual o GLOBO teve acesso, algumas previsões têm meta de cumprimento em até 90 dias, como a contratação de serviços especializados para utilização de ferramentas computacionais e sistema de gerenciamento de projetos do Componente Indígena. O termo também prevê a criação de um fundo de R$ 6 milhões para ser revertido em ações de sustentabilidade a serem destinadas exclusivamente às comunidades afetadas. Procurada para comentar sobre a assinatura do termo com a Funai e auto de infração, a Norte Energia não se manifestou.

— É um bom termo e nos dá elementos para continuar brigando. Nós não vamos abrir mão dos direitos dos povos indígenas. A Norte Energia tem de se comprometer, e nós conseguimos isso. Há um diferencial aqui, pelas multas. Antes, multa era só para o Ibama, mas nós conseguimos aqui um padrão de rigor que nos dá essa tranquilidade — disse o presidente da Funai.

O projeto leiloado previa que, quando a usina entrasse em operação, as condicionantes socioambientais, nas quais está incluída a questão indígena, já deveriam estar resolvidas.

— Lamentavelmente, não está (resolvida a questão indígena). Mas a Funai continua brigando e criando condições para que nada seja esquecido e que a Norte Energia faça aquilo que tem que ser feito para os povos indígenas.

Em setembro, o Ibama havia encaminhado à Norte Energia exigências para a emissão da licença operacional, que já se encontra livre de pendências. Uma das maiores obras do Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento (PAC), Belo Monte terá capacidade total de 11,2 mil Megawatts.

As contradições da Funai em Belo Monte (ISA)

Editorial do Instituto Socioambiental

Contradições, falta de um posicionamento claro e contundente por parte da Funai quanto a importantes ações de mitigação de impactos socioambientais da usina de Belo Monte (PA), colocam os povos indígenas da região em uma situação de absoluta vulnerabilidade e incertezas. Leia o Editorial do ISA sobre assunto

O presidente da Fundação Nacional do Índio (Funai), João Pedro Costa, enviou à presidente do Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente (Ibama), Marilene Ramos, no dia 12/11, um ofício com a síntese da avaliação da Funai a respeito da última etapa do licenciamento ambiental da hidrelétrica de Belo Monte (PA). Cabe ao presidente da Funai neste momento recomendar ou não ao Ibama o Licenciamento da Obra no tocante ao seu componente indígena. Cabe ao Ibama ponderar as recomendações da Funai e o parecer de seus técnicos sobre outros componentes socioambientais e decidir sobre a concessão da licença de operação da usina.

O documento da Funai, por um lado, pede sanções à empresa Norte Energia, dona da obra, pelas falhas na execução do componente indígena das condicionantes socioambientais da hidrelétrica. Certifica uma lista de impactos agravados com o não cumprimento de medidas de proteção às Terras Indígena e de saúde dos povos indígenas que vivem na região. Ainda verifica as consequências das ações mal sucedidas da empresa nas áreas atingidas. Solicita a reelaboração integral da matriz de impactos da obra e das correspondentes medidas de mitigação para os povos indígenas afetados. No entanto, surpreendentemente, o ofício afirma que “todas as demais ações relacionadas ao Componente Indígena necessárias, precedentes e preparatórias para o enchimento do reservatório e para implementação do trecho de vazão reduzida (TVR) também foram integralmente cumpridas”.

A contradição entre a existência de inúmeras e graves vulnerabilidades que ainda pesam sobre os povos indígenas e o indicativo de que é possível iniciar o enchimento do reservatório foi denunciada na imprensa e coloca em questão o papel do órgão na proteção dos povos indígenas da região. A Presidência da Funai posicionou-se hoje sobre as reportagens publicadas (veja aqui). O posicionamento da Funai sinaliza positivamente ao Ibama, no tocante ao componente indígena, para a emissão da Licença de Operação de Belo Monte, que permitirá o enchimento do reservatório e o inicio da geração de energia, mesmo sem haver as condições necessárias para enfrentar os impactos da finalização da obra.

A usina está em fase final de instalação, já tendo iniciado os planos de demissão de trabalhadores e desarticulação dos canteiros. Os Estudos de Impacto Ambiental da obra preveem para esta fase um aumento da população desempregada e pressões sobre recursos naturais das Terras Indígenas e Unidades de Conservação, com possibilidade de grave acirramento de conflitos interétnicos caso essas áreas não estejam adequadamente protegidas.

O documento enviado pelo presidente da Funai aponta que o Plano de Fiscalização e Vigilância das Terras Indígenas não foi executado. Faz referência ainda a obrigações de competência exclusiva do poder publico, relacionadas à garantia dos direitos territoriais dos povos indígenas atingidos pela obra que ainda não foram executadas. O exemplo mais gritante dessa situação diz respeito à Terra Indígena Cachoeira Seca. A área aguarda a homologação da Presidência da República e responde por um dos maiores índices de desmatamento do Brasil. Além das invasões de grileiros, a área tem sido palco de saques de exploração ilegal de madeireira sem precedentes (saiba mais).

Além de condicionantes estratégicas não cumpridas pelo empreendedor, existem ações complexas de responsabilidade do governo federal, que demandam articulação institucional e estão totalmente paralisadas, como os processos de retirada de moradores não indígenas das terras Apyterewa, Arara da Volta Grande, Cachoeira Seca e Paquiçamba. O próprio fortalecimento da Funai na região é uma questão de extrema importância que está sendo desconsiderada pelo presidente da instituição. Ao invés de reforçar a estrutura física e de profissionais que atuam na sede da Funai em Altamira, face aos inúmeros desafios colocados por Belo Monte, a Funai sofreu uma redução do número de servidores de 72%, entre os anos de 2011 e 2015, passando de 60 para apenas 23 servidores.

A dívida de Belo Monte com os povos indígenas do Xingu é grande e está sintetizada no Dossiê Belo Monte: Não há condições para a Licença de Operação, assim como no parecer técnico da Diretoria de Licenciamento da Funai emitido em setembro.

A falta de um posicionamento mais claro e contundente por parte da Funai, neste momento, quanto a importantes ações de mitigação de impactos socioambientais e de estruturação do órgão na região, coloca os povos indígenas numa situação de alta vulnerabilidade para encarar esses impactos negativos da usina apontados pelos Estudos de Impacto Ambiental (EIA) para a fase de operação do empreendimento.

(Instituto Socioambiental)

Ibama nega licença de operação a Belo Monte (Estadão)

ANDRÉ BORGES – O ESTADO DE S. PAULO

22 Setembro 2015 | 20h 24

Sem a autorização, a usina fica impedida de encher o reservatório para começar a gerar energia; instituto lista 12 exigências que não foram atendidas pela concessionária.

Hidrelétrica de Belo MonteHidrelétrica de Belo Monte

Atualizado às 23h00

O Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis (Ibama) negou o pedido da concessionária Norte Energia para emissão da licença de operação da hidrelétrica de Belo Monte, em construção no Pará. Sem a licença, a usina fica impedida de encher o seu reservatório e, consequentemente, de iniciar a geração de energia.

Na noite desta terça-feira, a Norte Energia, por sua vez, declarou que o parecer do Ibama não é uma “negativa de seu pedido” e sim um prazo para que a concessionária “faça a comprovação das ações compensatórias”. Essa comprovação, segundo a empresa, será dada ainda nesta semana.

Após análise criteriosa das condicionantes socioambientais que teriam de ser cumpridas pela Norte Energia, o Ibama concluiu que foram constatadas “pendências impeditivas” para a liberação da licença. Em despacho encaminhado hoje à diretoria da concessionária, o diretor de licenciamento do Ibama, Thomaz Miazaki, elencou 12 itens que não foram atendidos pela empresa.

“Diante da análise apresentada no referido Parecer Técnico, bem como do histórico de acompanhamento da equipe de licenciamento ambiental da UHE Belo Monte, informo que foram constatadas pendências impeditivas à emissão da Licença de Operação para o empreendimento”, declara Miazaki.

Para liberar o empreendimento, o Ibama exige o cumprimento de uma série de empreendimentos. Na área logística, afirma que é preciso que sejam concluídas obras de recomposição das 12 interferências em acessos existentes na região, além da implantação das oito pontes e duas passarelas previstas para adequação do sistema viário de Altamira, município mais afetado pela usina.

O órgão pede a conclusão das obras de saneamento nas vilas “Ressaca” e “Garimpo do Galo”, a comprovação de que o sistema de abastecimento de água (captação superficial) nas localidades em vilas próximas à usina encontra-se em operação para atendimento da população local e apresentação de cronograma e metas para operação do sistema de esgotamento sanitário de Altamira. “As metas deverão considerar os dados da modelagem matemática de qualidade da água dos Igarapés de Altamira apresentada pela Norte Energia”, declara o Ibama.

Os atrasos em reassentamentos também foram destacados pelo instituto. O órgão pede a conclusão do remanejamento da população atingida diretamente pela usina, especialmente aquelas localizadas na área urbana de Altamira, além dos ribeirinhos moradores de ilhas e “beiradões” do rio Xingu. É cobrado o cronograma para conclusão da implantação da infraestrutura prevista para o reassentamentos urbanos coletivos (RUCs). O mesmo vale para moradores da área rural.

A Norte Energia terá que concluir a execução do projeto de “demolição e desinfecção de estruturas e edificações” na região atingida pelo reservatório e apresentar planejamento para o “cenário de necessidade de tratamento das famílias que, embora localizadas fora da área diretamente atingida, poderão sofrer eventuais impactos decorrentes da elevação do lençol freático em áreas urbanas de Altamira, após a configuração final do reservatório Xingu”.

Finalmente, a empresa terá que concluir as metas de corte e limpeza de vegetação definidas no “plano de enchimento”. Todas as exigências deverão ser alimentadas com registros fotográficos e demais documentos.

Pesquisa avaliará os impactos socioambientais de Belo Monte (Fapesp)

O pesquisador Emilio Moran, na frente da casa em que morou por 14 meses entre 1973 e 1974, em uma agrovila próxima à Transamazônica (arquivo pessoal)

10/02/2014

Por José Tadeu Arantes

Agência FAPESP – Uma pesquisa científica vai avaliar os impactos sociais e ambientais da construção da usina hidrelétrica de Belo Monte, próxima à cidade de Altamira, no Pará.  A pesquisa, intitulada “Processos sociais e ambientais que acompanham a construção da hidroelétrica de Belo Monte, Altamira, PA”, tem apoio da FAPESP por meio do SPEC – São Paulo Excellence Chair, que visa propiciar a vinda ao Brasil de pesquisadores de primeira linha do exterior para criar núcleos de pesquisa em universidades paulistas.

A pesquisa é liderada pelo cubano Emilio Federico Moran, professor da Michigan State University, nos Estados Unidos, agora vinculado ao Núcleo de Estudos Ambientais (Nepam) da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp). Com uma longa experiência no Brasil, resultante de quatro décadas de pesquisa sobre as transformações em curso no setor rural brasileiro, em especial na Amazônia, Moran coordena uma equipe multidisciplinar de pesquisadores, de várias universidades brasileiras, centralizada pelo Nepam.

O trabalho de campo está em fase inicial de implantação em Altamira. A pesquisa deverá se estender até agosto de 2018. Participam da equipe cientistas da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, da Universidade Federal do Pará e da Universidade Estadual do Pará.

“Começaremos com o levantamento dos impactos sobre a população urbana”, disse Moran, desde Altamira, à Agência FAPESP. “Elaborei junto com meus colaboradores um questionário para entender como a construção da hidrelétrica está afetando os moradores antigos, o pessoal que já estava aqui. Depois, enfocaremos os moradores novos, aqueles que vieram atraídos pela obra: operários, comerciantes, engenheiros, profissionais de vários tipos.”

“Também queremos determinar o efeito da usina sobre o setor agrícola, que é um setor muito produtivo nesta região da Amazônia”, prosseguiu o pesquisador.

“Tenho feito estudos na área desde os anos 1970, quando, para realizar minha pesquisa de doutorado, visitei a região pela primeira vez. No setor rural, parece que temos duas possibilidades. Pode ser que o crescimento da população urbana em função da hidrelétrica, fazendo aumentar a demanda de alimentos, promova uma intensificação agrícola na região. Mas pode ser também que as obras atraiam trabalhadores do campo, levando a um enfraquecimento da agricultura familiar por falta de mão de obra no setor agrícola. As primeiras observações apontam nesse sentido, mas estamos só começando os estudos”, disse.

Uma terceira linha de pesquisa vai acompanhar a população ribeirinha. Um contingente de 20 mil pessoas deverá ser reassentado em razão da barragem.

“Vamos acompanhar de perto essa população nativa, que será a mais diretamente afetada. Porque os indígenas conseguiram que a companhia mudasse o plano da barragem, de forma a não terem efeitos diretos. Terão, sim, efeitos indiretos. Já os ribeirinhos vivenciarão um reassentamento enorme: muitos povoados ribeirinhos vão ter de mudar e, de fato, vários já estão sendo removidos na área”, disse Moran.

Segundo o pesquisador, o termo “ribeirinho” pode se aplicar também a uma parte da população urbana, uma vez que há bairros constituídos por palafitas, na beira do rio Xingu, que serão alagados com a construção da barragem. Esses bairros são habitados por ribeirinhos que estão em processo de transição de uma existência isolada no meio do mato para uma vida com acesso a saúde, educação e outros serviços disponíveis na área urbana.

Uma das ocupações da equipe do projeto de pesquisa, em seus primeiros meses de atividade, será fazer um estudo exaustivo da literatura internacional sobre impactos socioambientais de hidrelétricas. Há obras de grande porte na China, na Índia, no Laos e em outros países emergentes que podem servir de parâmetro para o estudo de Belo Monte.

De acordo com Moran, as observações preliminares na área permitem perceber que alguns problemas que ocorreram no exterior já se manifestam também no Pará.

“A população de Altamira dobrou nos últimos dois anos. Já alcançou 150 mil pessoas. E vários preparativos para receber essa população foram prometidos, mas não realizados a tempo”, comentou. “De modo que Altamira está agora com sua capacidade esgotada em termos de leitos hospitalares, vagas escolares, efetivos de segurança etc., criando-se uma situação caótica para todos na cidade.”

“O supercrescimento deveria ter sido acompanhado por um superinvestimento em equipamentos para atender a essa nova população. A pesquisa poderá mostrar como deveremos agir em futuras hidrelétricas para reduzir os custos sociais e ambientais de grandes projetos como Belo Monte”, disse Moran.

“Esperamos poder subsidiar propostas para um planejamento que considere as pessoas tão importantes como a produção de energia”, disse o pesquisador.

Belo Monte é um absurdo e termelétricas são desnecessárias [((o))eco]

Daniele Bragança

22 de Janeiro de 2013

Para Célio Bermann, eletricidade produzida com excedente de bagaço de cana equivaleria a duas Belo Montes.

O setor de energia ganhou as primeiras páginas dos jornais no início de 2013 com o baixo nível dos reservatórios e a possibilidade de manter as termelétricas ligadas ao longo de todo o ano para compensar a falta de chuvas. Célio Bermann, professor do Instituto de Eletrotécnica e Energia da USP, é um crítico severo dessa solução. Um dos mais respeitados especialistas na área energética do país, trabalhou como assessor da então Ministra Dilma Rousseff no Ministério de Minas e Energia, entre 2003 e 2004. “Saí quando verifiquei que o Ministério de Minas e Energia estava fazendo o contrário do que eu pensava que seria possível”, diz ele. Severo crítico da hidrelétrica de Belo Monte, fez parte do painel de especialistasque concluíram que o projeto da usina não deveria ter seguimento.

Bermann conversou com ((o))eco sobre os caminhos do setor energético e possíveis soluções para evitar o uso intensivo das termoelétricas como complementação das hidrelétricas.

((o))eco: O Ministério de Minas e Energia estuda usar as termelétricas de forma permanente, para poupar os reservatórios. O que o senhor acha disso?
Utilizar termelétricas para complementar o sistema hidrelétrico é uma solução equivocada. Em primeiro lugar, estamos falando de um sistema elétrico que prioriza a geração de energia a partir da água, o que o torna dependente do regime hidrológico. É preciso com urgência diversificar a matriz de eletricidade do Brasil, utilizando fontes que, ao mesmo tempo, possam complementar o regime da falta de água e que sejam viáveis do ponto de vista econômico e ambiental.

((o))eco: Por quê?
Primeiro, porque a termoeletricidade pode custar 4 vezes mais do que a hidroeletricidade. Além disso, utiliza três fontes fósseis derivados de petróleo: óleo combustível, carvão mineral e gás natural. O principal problema na utilização das fontes fósseis, ao meu entender, não são as emissões de gases de efeito estufa. No caso brasileiro, o problema maior das termoelétricas é serem emissoras de hidrocarbonetos, de dióxido de nitrogênio, de dióxido de enxofre, de material particulado e de fumaça.

((o))eco: Quais são as consequências?
O impacto ambiental dessas fontes é sobre a saúde pública. A vizinhança dessas usinas fica suscetível a doenças crônicas causadas por esse coquetel de poluição.

((o))eco: Há termelétricas que utilizam água na sua refrigeração. Isso causa impactos negativos?
Em geral, essas usinas utilizam água dos rios próximos. Existem regiões no Brasil em que o comprometimento hídrico impede a construção de termelétricas. No estado de São Paulo, no rio Piracicaba, por exemplo, não foi possível construir usinas a gás natural porque elas demandavam um volume de água além das possibilidades da bacia deste rio.

((o)) eco: Qual é o custo das termelétricas?

A partir do bagaço da cana de açúcar, resíduo da produção sucroalcooleira, pode-se produzir 10 mil megawatts excedentes, o que equivale a mais de 2 vezes a energia média produzida por Belo Monte.

A energia das termelétricas pode custar até 4 vezes mais do que a hidroeletricidade. Ao mesmo tempo, com a Medida Provisória 579, o governo quer reduzir a tarifa de energia usando recursos do Tesouro Nacional. É um absurdo, pois esta medida afeta indiretamente o bolso dos consumidores. Somos nós que vamos pagar por essa redução da tarifa. É uma forma fictícia de fazer algo desejável: reduzir a tarifa. Temos uma das tarifas de energia elétrica mais cara do mundo, algo absurdo porque nossa matriz com ênfase em hidrelétricas produz energia que deveria ser barata.

((o))eco: E quais seriam essas alternativas?
São três: a conservação da energia, o uso da biomassa e da energia eólica. A primeira alternativa é pensar na conservação e no uso eficiente da energia. É preciso uma ampla campanha nas mídias para ensinar à população a reduzir o desperdício. O governo está fazendo o contrário, quando diz que não há risco de racionamento.

Quando o governo prefere a termoeletricidade como base, está dizendo: vamos usar a termoeletricidade de forma que não se tenha riscos durante o período em que a hidrologia é desfavorável, que é o período entre junho e outubro. Essa solução, como já pontuei antes, é completamente inadequada.

A campanha por redução do consumo de energia deve abranger também grandes consumidores industriais. Estou falando de 6 setores: cimento, siderurgia, alumínio, química, ferro-liga e papel/celulose. Em conjunto, eles respondem pelo consumo de 30% da energia no Brasil. Não estou falando em fechar essas fábricas, mas que um esforço desses setores na redução da sua escala de produção aumentaria a disponibilidade de energia para a economia e para a população. É uma questão de interesse público.

((o))eco: E a segunda alternativa?

No mês de outubro, por causa do regime hidrológico, a capacidade de geração ficará reduzida a 1mil megawatts, ou seja, 10 % da capacidade instalada.

A segunda alternativa é a utilização do potencial do setor sucroalcooleiro como fonte de complementação de energia. O Instituto de Eletrotécnica e Energia da USP recentemente constatou que, a partir do bagaço da cana de açúcar, resíduo da produção sucroalcooleira, pode-se produzir 10 mil megawatts excedentes, o que equivale a mais de 2 vezes a energia média produzida por Belo Monte. Essa energia pode chegar ao sistema elétrico em 3 ou 4 meses e a custo baixo.

Hoje, o bagaço é utilizado para complementar a própria necessidade de eletricidade das usinas. Mas elas também poderiam comercializar o excedente que é dessa ordem que eu falei, de 10 mil megawatts. Elas já comercializam 1.230 megawatts de energia elétrica excedente.

((o))eco: Por que essa energia não está disponível?
Uma resolução da Aneel (Agência Nacional de Energia Elétrica) determina que cabe à usina o investimento para construir as linhas de transmissão de energia que levem esse excedente da usina até uma subestação ou uma rede de distribuição de energia elétrica. Nosso levantamento, feito para algumas regiões, mostra que a distância entre as usinas e a rede varia de 10 a 30 km, percurso relativamente curto.

((o)) eco: E o que poderia ser feito para viabilizar estas pequenas linhas?
O BNDES (Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento) poderia financiar a construção dessas linhas. Com crédito, esse excedente poderia estar disponível já na próxima safra, em abril de 2013. Com investimento na troca de equipamentos de cogeração ─ caldeiras de maior pressão ─ esses 10 mil megawatts potenciais da biomassa podem dobrar para 20 mil megawatts. De novo, em nome do interesse público, o BNDES poderia ser o financiador.

Infelizmente, o BNDES está usando 22,5 bilhões de reais para financiar a construção da usina hidrelétrica de Belo Monte. Quando ficar pronta, em 2019, ela acrescentará apenas 4.400 megawatts médios ao sistema elétrico. Veja o absurdo, a política do governo prioriza megaobras de hidrelétricas, quando existem soluções de energia complementar às hidros, que funcionam justamente na época das secas. A safra da cana de açúcar ocorre no período de menos chuvas, que vai de maio até novembro.

((o))eco: Belo Monte deveria ser descartado, então?

Conforme dados oficiais, o sistema de transmissão e distribuição nacional tem uma perda técnica (excluindo os gatos) da ordem de 15,4%.

Belo Monte deveria ser descartada. O custo é enorme: 30 bilhões de reais para uma capacidade instalada de 11.233 megawatts. Essa capacidade estará disponível durante 3 ou 4 meses por ano, no período das chuvas. No mês de outubro, por causa do regime hidrológico, a capacidade de geração ficará reduzida a 1mil megawatts, ou seja, 10 % da capacidade instalada. A média ao longo do ano é de 4400 megawatts. A contribuição do rio Xingu e da Usina de Belo Monte é uma fração do que está sendo alegado para justificar a construção da usina. Eu afirmo, Belo Monte atende ao interesse das empreiteiras e empresas ligadas à sua construção, e não à população e a economia brasileira.

((o))eco: E a terceira alternativa?
A terceira alternativa é a energia eólica. No nordeste, o regime de ventos é maior justamente na época da estiagem. Os reservatórios do rio São Francisco podem acumular água durante o período mais crítico, enquanto a energia eólica abasteceria a região nordeste. Ouve-se a alegação de que a biomassa, a eólica, são fontes intermitentes. Ora, a hidroeletricidade também é intermitente, pois depende do regime hidrológico.

((o))eco: E quanto a eficiência, qual é o percentual de perda nas linhas de transmissão?
Conforme dados oficiais, o sistema de transmissão e distribuição nacional tem uma perda técnica (excluindo os gatos) da ordem de 15,4%. É impossível eliminar todas as perdas, mas cortar 5 pontos percentuais é tecnologicamente viável e traz grandes benefícios econômicos. Basta investir na manutenção do sistema: isolar melhor os fios de transmissão e trocar transformadores que já esgotaram sua vida útil. O número crescente de apagões é uma evidência de má manutenção. Por exemplo, parafusos velhos levam à queda de torres de transmissão.

Dessa forma, a perda poderia ser reduzida para cerca de 10% e acrescentariam ao sistema elétrico o equivalente a uma usina hidrelétrica de 6.100 megawatts ─ 150% mais da média de Belo Monte ─ de acordo com cálculo recente que fiz com estudantes da Pós-Graduação em Energia do IEE. Isso poderia ser alcançado a um terço do custo de produzir um novo megawatt.

A Aneel é leniente em relação às perdas. É fundamental que ela defina, em nome do interesse público, metas de redução de perdas técnicas nas empresas de distribuição e concessionárias de distribuição de energia. O alcance dessas metas deveria ser associado à redução tarifária.

((o))eco: É caro construir novas linhas de transmissão?
Sim, principalmente para levar energia distante dos centros de consumo, como é o caso dos projetos de hidrelétricas que estão sendo construídas na Amazônia.

((o))eco: E a energia nuclear? O Brasil deve pensar em investir nesta alternativa de energia?
A energia nuclear é uma fonte cara, desnecessária e com um risco de ocorrência de acidentes severos. Além das usinas de Angra 1 e 2, estamos construindo Angra 3. Todas elas numa região que é imprópria para a implantação de usinas nucleares. Angra dos Reis é uma região suscetível a grandes chuvas no verão. Não é impensável a possibilidade que uma chuva mais severa derrube as linhas que transmitem energia elétrica do sistema até as usinas.

O resultado da interrupção de fornecimento de energia elétrica pode fazer as bombas de refrigeração de água dos reatores pararem, provocando o superaquecimento e a explosão do reator, que foi o que aconteceu, em fevereiro de 2011, nos 4 reatores de Fukushima, no Japão. Com um agravante: a única via de escoamento da população é a Rio-Santos, absolutamente incapaz de evacuar toda a população local. A empresa Eletronuclear considera, hoje, uma população da ordem de 200 mil habitantes. Essa população dobra na época das férias, que coincide com a época das chuvas.