Arquivo da tag: Jogos Olímpicos

Shepherd of the City’s Rebirth, Rio’s Mayor Feels the Strains, Too (New York Times)

FEB. 28, 2014

“Don’t ever in your life do a World Cup and the Olympic Games at the same time,” Mr. Paes recently said. “This will make your life almost impossible.” Credit: Marizilda Cruppe for The New York Times

RIO DE JANEIRO — IN his fits of rage, Eduardo Paes, the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, has thrown a stapler at one aide. He threw an ashtray at another. He berated a councilwoman in her chambers, calling her a tramp. Stunning diners at a crowded Japanese restaurant where he was being taunted by one constituent, a singer in a rock band, he punched the man in the face.

While Mr. Paes, 44, has apologized to the targets of his wrath after each episode, he adds that he is under a lot of stress. Normally clocking 15-hour days as he tears up and rebuilds parts of Rio in the most far-reaching overhaul of the city in decades, Mr. Paes is finding that consensus over his plans is elusive.

“Don’t ever in your life do a World Cup and the Olympic Games at the same time,” Mr. Paes recently said at a debate here on Rio’s transformation, making at a stab at gallows humor over the street protests that have seized the city over the past year. “This will make your life almost impossible.”

Mr. Paes has a point. Political leaders across the country may have thought that landing these mega-events would open the way for widespread celebrations of Brazil’s emergence as a developing-world powerhouse, with Rio dazzling in its resurgence. But as Mr. Paes acknowledges, things have not quite worked out that way.

“I’m not cut out to be a masochist, to be someone shouted down and cursed at,” he said in an interview, referring to the way some of his more vocal critics approach him on Rio’s streets. “But this process reflects democratization, the development of citizens in Brazil,” he added. “I don’t think the protests are over.”

Instead of widespread jubilation, Brazil is confronting embarrassing delays in getting stadiums, airports and transit systems finished before the World Cup even starts in June. Protesters are questioning why funds are being lavished on sporting venues when public schools and hospitals remain underfunded. Evictions here of slum dwellers are fueling resentment over big development projects.

Meanwhile, the explosive Mr. Paes, whose political fortunes were rising before the street protests, finds himself at the center of increasingly fierce disputes over what kind of city Rio is turning into.

“I think this guy is a 171,” said Gilva Gomes da Silva, 40, the owner of a tire-repair shop in Favela do Metrô, a slum where his home was demolished. The term 171 is slang on Rio’s streets for someone deceptive, a reference to the penal code number for the crime of fraud. While Mr. Gomes da Silva said that his new public housing unit was acceptable, he complained that the project for which his home was destroyed, a large commercial area for car repairs, had not even materialized. “He’s fooling us,” the tire repairman said of the mayor.

For more than a decade, Brazil has been led by two leftists famous for their struggles. President Dilma Rousseff is a former urban guerrilla who was jailed and tortured during the military dictatorship. Her predecessor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who rose to the presidency after making his name as a union leader, was born into a family of sharecroppers and never made it past elementary school.

Mr. Paes stands in stark contrast to that. Born into privilege and raised in exclusive districts of Rio, he was educated as a lawyer at the city’s top private university before going into politics.

He cut his teeth in the early 1990s as an aide to César Maia, a former Rio mayor, joining a total of five political parties over the span of his career, finally landing in the centrist Brazilian Democratic Movement Party.

After stints as a city councilman and a congressman, he defeated Fernando Gabeira, an iconic leader of Brazil’s Green Party, in the 2008 mayoral race. And even though Rio’s left rallied around Marcelo Freixo, a human rights activist, in opposition to Mr. Paes in 2012, the mayor glided to re-election with 65 percent of the votes.

But in the space of a few months, the landslide victory gave way to scenes in which Mr. Paes was hounded by protesters. Despite being faced with frequent criticism, Mr. Paes, an aficionado of the short, narrow cigars called cigarrilhas, shows few signs of growing a thicker skin.

Lashing out at the masked protesters called the Black Blocs, named for their black clothing and face-concealing scarves, he called them morons. He defended costly endeavors like the $100 million Museum of Tomorrow, an ambitious project designed by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, saying, “We need icons.” And he insisted on putting his aggressive overhaul of Rio into context.

“I don’t want to compare my city to Zurich, thank God we’re not that boring,” said Mr. Paes over breakfast served by uniformed servants at Rio’s imposing City Hall, a tower commonly called the Piranhão, or Big Harlot, since it stands in an area where the authorities razed a red-light district in the 1970s and ’80s.

“Rio is advancing fast,” he said, “but we’re at a different phase in our civilization.”

FEW people here dispute that Mr. Paes has put into motion a construction spree with few parallels in Rio’s history. Work crews are feverishly rebuilding areas around the port, a dilapidated district of decaying buildings that resembles old Havana, while tearing down eyesores like the elevated highway cutting through the old center.

At the same time, Mr. Paes is overseeing ventures like the Transcarioca, a roadway linking the international airport to Barra da Tijuca, a sprawling zone of residential towers, slums and gated communities, and an array of new installations for the Summer Olympics in 2016, when his second term is scheduled to end.

Mr. Paes’s real estate frenzy has drawn comparisons to the vision of Francisco Pereira Passos, the mayor who ripped apart swaths of Rio at the start of the 20th century to put in Beaux-Arts buildings and boulevards inspired by Paris.

But Mr. Paes insisted that the Pereira Passos era was different because it largely involved attempts to Europeanize coveted areas of Rio. “My projects aren’t in the most noble areas,” he said, contending that the exclusive beachfront districts are mostly absent from his plans.

The bonanza for developers and construction companies is accentuating tension on Rio’s streets, with the huge demonstrations over rising transportation fares and unsatisfactory public services in 2013 evolving into a steady drip of smaller but violent confrontations between protesters and the police.

Some of the animosity is related to efforts by officials to assert control over some of Rio’s favelas, or slums, with new protests erupting over killings of favela residents by the police. Armed gangs in some favelas have aggressively countered police forces in recent weeks, pointing to the erosion of gains made in lowering crime rates.

Mr. Paes argues that certain developments are beyond his control. Responsibility over the police rests with the governor of Rio de Janeiro State, Sérgio Cabral, who may be the only elected official in Rio to have attracted more ire from protesters than Mr. Paes.

Indeed, Mr. Paes seems more admired abroad than at home. At a summit meeting in South Africa in February, he succeeded Michael R. Bloomberg, New York’s former mayor, as the leader of the C40, a network of cities seeking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

WHEN in Rio, Mr. Paes insists he is having the time of his life as mayor. He says that he appreciates the vibrancy of Brazil’s democracy and that he still enjoys drinking draft beer at Rio’s botecos, the street dives that are an elemental part of the city’s social fabric. He clearly revels in the perks of his job.

He said Gracie Mansion had nothing on his home, comparing the residence of New York’s mayor to Gávea Pequena, the luxurious palace, replete with tropical gardens and, at least during a stretch in 2013, protesters camped at the entrance, where Mr. Paes lives with his wife and two children.

Mr. Paes argued that the disillusionment with Rio’s political class was generalized and not necessarily directed just at him. Some of Rio’s residents, including those who have grown accustomed to hearing that the city’s time to shine has finally arrived, agree.

“I have nothing against him,” said Gilmar Mello, 47, who owns a small store selling motorcycle gear in Favela do Metrô. His business sits next to a pile of rubble after recent evictions and demolitions in the slum, not far from the refurbished Maracanã soccer stadium. “Everyone who gets into the mayor’s office will do the same thing.”

Anúncios

Hunt for the Amazonian Olympian (Daily Mail)

Brazil talent scouts search jungle tribes for the archers and kayakers who could win gold at Rio 2016

  • Brazil talent scouts search the Amazon rainforest for talented youngsters
  • The indigenous Indians, born in the heart of the jungle, are believed to possess traditional bow and arrow skills in their blood
  • They can hunt and kill birds flying 100m high and can spear fish in the river
  • They are being put forward for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro
  • Scouts are also searching for skilled kayakers and canoeists

By JANET TAPPIN COELHO

PUBLISHED: 18:07 GMT, 5 October 2013 | UPDATED: 12:41 GMT, 6 October 2013

He stands poised in a boat in the rainforest – his gaze straight, cheeks painted red and arrow sharp and drawn back.

Still of school age, this Amazonian boy could be the next gold medalist in archery at the 2016 Olympic Games.

Talent scouts search tribes for youngsters born in the heart of the jungle, whom they believe possess traditional bow and arrow skills in their blood, it has been revealed.

Scroll down for video

huntHunt: Brazilian talent scouts search tribes for youngsters born in the heart of the jungle, who possess traditional bow and arrow skills in their blood, it has been revealed 

Talented: Many of the youngsters can already hunt and kill birds flying 100 metres high in the air and can spear fish in the local river with just one hitTalented: Many of the youngsters can already hunt and kill birds flying 100 metres high in the air and can spear fish in the local river with just one hit 

Aim: A young Indian girl gazes straight ahead as she draws back an arrow, ready to shoot Aim: A young Indian girl gazes straight ahead as she draws back an arrow, ready to shoot

Future champion? This Amazonian boy could be a future gold medalist in archeryFuture champion? This Amazonian boy could one day be a gold medalist in archery

They hunt talented children from indigenous Indian tribes – many whom can already hunt and kill birds flying 100 metres high in the air and can spear fish in the river with just one hit.

They believe the youngsters have the potential to become successful competitors in archery in the Rio de Janeiro games.

The Brazilian scouts also explore the world’s largest rainforest – home to about 400 Indian tribes – for skilled kayakers and canoeists.

‘I find archers with innate ability,’ said Marcia Lot, an Olympic selector from the Amazonas Sustainable Foundation (FAS), who has been combining the jungle for talent since February.

Brazil TV film Amazonian indians trying out for Olympic squad

The children, who belong to tribes in the world's largest rainforest, have the potential to become successful competitors in archery in the Rio de Janeiro gamesPotential: The children, who belong to tribes in the world’s largest rainforest, have the potential to become successful competitors in archery in the Rio de Janeiro games

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Hereditary: Traditional archery skills are believed to have been passed down from generation to generation

‘This strong tradition has been handed down from generation to generation and passed from parents to children.

‘Now, the indigenous youngsters are interested in using their skills to change their life.’

Ms Lot’s hunt has taken her to eight tribal communities with different ethnic groups, including the Xingu, Kambeba and Aldeia Kuana tribes.

More than 80 candidates were initially chosen – all of whom were believed to possess ‘natural’ bow and arrow skills.

After a series of qualifying tournaments held by the Amazonian Federation of Archery (FATARCO) in June, the numbers were whittled down to the top 10.

Further trials are set to take place this month, with selectors choosing their final top three.

They will then continue with advanced training, before being put forward for the Olympics.

Practice: Ms Lot's hunt has taken her to eight tribal communities with different ethnic groups, including the Xingu, Kambeba and Aldeia Kuana tribesPractice: Ms Lot’s hunt has taken her to eight tribal communities with different ethnic groups, including the Xingu, Kambeba and Aldeia Kuana tribes

Ready, aim, shoot: Three youngsters line up and prepare to shoot their arrows at a distant targetReady, aim, shoot: Three youngsters line up and prepare to shoot their arrows at a distant target

‘We plan to take the three official members to the National Athletic Championship – held in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, from November 10 to 17, to feel the atmosphere of the competition and to start preparing them for the 2016 Olympics,’ said Ms Lot.

To find elite Olympic material, the FAS has concentrated its efforts on teenagers born in the heart of the rainforest who it believes have both archery skills and the discipline needed to become a professional in the sport.

‘They can hunt and hit a macaw flying 100 metres up in the air and spear a fish in the river,’ said FAS chief executive Virgilio Viana.

‘The challenge for us now is to mix this traditional wisdom which is in their blood with the cutting edge technology of the Olympic sports.’

Roberval Fernando dos Santos, FATARCO’s Brazilian archery coach, added: ‘We are selecting young people with discipline, character, stable family backgrounds and emotional structure.’

Contest: More than 80 candidates were initially chosen for the Olympic Games - all of whom were believed to possess 'natural' bow and arrow skills

Contest: More than 80 candidates were initially chosen for the Olympic Games – all of whom were believed to possess ‘natural’ bow and arrow skills

Trials: Further contests are set to take place this month, with selectors choosing their final top three. The youngsters will then continue with advanced training, before being put forward for the Olympics

Trials: Further contests are set to take place this month, with selectors choosing their final top three. The youngsters will then continue with advanced training, before being put forward for the Olympics

Dedicated: The 10 fledgling athletes have moved from their villages in the jungle to live for a few weeks in the Olympic Village in Manaus, the capital of AmazonasDedicated: The 10 fledgling athletes have moved from their villages in the jungle to live for a few weeks in the Olympic Village in Manaus, the capital of Amazonas

The 10 fledgling athletes have moved from their villages in the jungle to live for a few weeks in the Olympic Village in Manaus, the capital of Amazonas.

There, they are undergoing intensive technique training with dos Santos.

‘Professional archery is very different from what they are accustomed to practising on a daily basis, he said. ‘They have had to learn posture, coordination, alignment and anchoring, as well as the release and follow-through of the arrow.

‘They have built up their strength and concentration – and because of their inherent abilities, they have accelerated through the training and we are seeing their talents emerge.’

One of the 10 trainees is Jardel Cruz Gomes, 16, from the Kambeba tribe in the Cuieras region near the Rio Negro.

His very first toy was a bow and arrow, and he is currently the 2013 champion of archery at the 6th edition of the Indigenous Games.

‘I hope I’m one of the three selected,’ he said. ‘I would love to bring a medal home. Not just for me but for my whole community.’

Water sports: The scouts say their next step in 2014 is to find talented canoeing and kayaking champions - with natives using the numerous waterways coursing through the jungle as their highwaysWater sports: The scouts say their next step in 2014 is to find talented canoeing and kayaking champions – with natives using the numerous waterways coursing through the jungle as their highways

For indigenous Indian families, the training project is being seen as an important step.

‘Formerly, the indigenous peoples were forgotten. Not today. We are being looked at more closely and valued for what we have to offer,’ said Mr Gomes’s father.

Traditionally used as a weapon of war, the bow and arrow is now used for hunting, fishing and rituals by indigenous tribes.

It has also become a sport, played between villages and in the annual Indigenous Games.

Most of the Brazilian Indian tribes make the bow from the stem of a palm tree called Tucum, which is dark in colour and found very close to the river.

The arrow is made from a kind of bamboo or bamboo thicket called Caninha. Tips are formed with the wood of the arrow or some natives use bones and the teeth of animals.

Olympic selectors are planning more scouting trips to tap into the natural skills of the country’s Indian tribes.

They say their next step in 2014 is to find talented canoeing and kayaking champions – with natives using the numerous waterways coursing through the jungle as their highways.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2445761/Hunt-Amazonian-Olympian-archer-Brazil-talent-scouts-search-jungle-tribes-archers-kayakers-win-gold-Rio-2016.html#ixzz2gxc6DpN4 

Mascote em extinção? (Ciência Hoje)

Pesquisadores criam plano de ação para preservar o macaco muriqui. Confira a entrevista concedida por um dos responsáveis pelo projeto à CH On-line.

Por: Mariana Rocha, Ciência Hoje On-line

Publicado em 19/03/2013 | Atualizado em 20/03/2013

Mascote em extinção?Maior primata não humano das Américas, o muriqui sofre em função do desmatamento desenfreado e da caça para consumo humano. (foto: Sinara Conessa/ Flickr – CC BY 2.0)

Menos de três mil exemplares. É tudo o que resta do macaco muriqui na Mata Atlântica. Forte candidato a mascote das Olimpíadas de 2016, o primata corre o risco de sumir das florestas por conta do desmatamento desenfreado e da caça para consumo humano. No intuito de reverter esse quadro, pesquisadores traçam estratégias para garantir a sobrevivência do muriqui.

Batizado de Plano de Ação Nacional para a Conservação dos Muriquis (PAN Muriquis) e desenvolvido no âmbito do Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade(ICMBio), o projeto conta com dez metas e 54 ações. As atividades são diversas e englobam medidas como a contagem das populações de muriquis, a fiscalização das florestas para protegê-los de caçadores e iniciativas de educação ambiental que conscientizem a população sobre a importância do macaco.

Na lista vermelha da União Internacional para a Conservação da Natureza, o muriqui-do-norte, que ocupa Minas Gerais e Espírito Santo, é classificado como animal criticamente em perigo e, dentro de três gerações, pode sofrer uma redução populacional de 80%. Já o muriqui-do-sul, encontrado no Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo e norte do Paraná, é classificado como espécie em perigo e pode ter sua população diminuída em pelo menos 20% dentro de duas gerações.

Até 2020, o PAN Muriquis pretende retroceder em pelo menos um nível o risco de extinção do primata. A meta é fazer com que o muriqui-do-norte seja classificado como espécie em perigo e o do sul como vulnerável.

Candidato a mascote

De origem indígena, a palavra muriqui significa povo manso da floresta e descreve um animal de comportamento pacífico e solidário. O hábito de abraçar seus companheiros fez do macaco um forte candidato a representar os anfitriões brasileiros nas Olimpíadas de 2016.

Veja vídeo da campanha em favor do muriqui como mascote das Olimpíadas de 2016

A campanha para eleger o primata-mascote do evento conta com o apoio de instituições envolvidas no PAN Muriquis e discute a necessidade de preservá-lo.

Para saber mais sobre ações que buscam garantir a sobrevivência do macaco muriqui, a CH On-line conversou com Maurício Talebi, bioantropólogo da Universidade Federal de São Paulo-Diadema e coautor do PAN Muriquis.

Maurício TalebiComo e quando começou a elaboração do PAN Muriquis?
O projeto surgiu a partir do Plano de Sobrevivência das Espécies, uma ferramenta conceitual da Comissão de Sobrevivência das Espécies (CSE), uma divisão da União Internacional para Conservação da Natureza. A CSE desenvolve atividades para a conservação de diversas espécies ameaçadas no planeta. O documento que descreve as ações do PAN Muriqui começou a ser desenvolvido em 2003 pelo ICMBio e foi finalizado em 2010. Esse planejamento contou com a participação de diversos setores da sociedade, como governo, universidades e organizações não governamentais.

Quais são as principais atividades do homem que prejudicam os muriquis?
Diversas ameaças acometem populações selvagens de muriquis. As principais são a redução de hábitat, caça ilegal, baixos investimentos em vigilância e fiscalização, índices reduzidos de reprodução em cativeiro e a fragmentação do hábitat em ilhas de florestas.

O senhor coordena o monitoramento das populações de muriquis em vários locais – alguns deles já são estudados há 20 anos. Como essa medida auxilia no planejamento de ações para preservar os muriquis?
Pesquisas de longa duração são fundamentais por vários motivos. É importante obter informações sobre os animais em várias épocas do ano, conhecer seu comportamento frente a variações ambientais, entender como eles organizam sua vida cotidiana e como executam tarefas vitais para a sobrevivência. Obtemos, também, informações sobre quais variáveis ambientais devem ser levadas em conta durante ações de reflorestamento do hábitat desses primatas. Complementarmente, esses estudos propiciam o treinamento das futuras gerações de pesquisadores. Nosso grupo de pesquisa na Associação Pró-muriqui treinou mais de 200 estudantes de graduação e pós-graduação nos últimos dez anos.

Quais são as principais dificuldades na execução do PAN Muriquis?
O principal fator restritivo é a baixa disponibilidade de recursos financeiros. Atualmente, contamos com recursos humanos qualificados para a execução desses trabalhos, mas faltam recursos para financiar a mão de obra. Uma das metas é criar um fundo financeiro que viabilize a execução de todas as ações do plano. Lamentamos que, no Brasil, os fundos financeiros para a conservação de hábitat e de espécies ainda sejam praticamente inexistentes.

O senhor acredita que a candidatura do muriqui a mascote das Olimpíadas de 2016 pode auxiliar na preservação do primata?

Caso seja confirmado como mascote olímpico, o muriqui será conhecido globalmente e diversos setores da economia se interessarão por investir em um emblema tão poderoso quanto ele

Certamente sim. A maioria dos brasileiros desconhece que o maior primata (não humano) das Américas ocorre exclusivamente em nosso país. Caso seja confirmado como mascote olímpico, o muriqui será conhecido globalmente e diversos setores da economia se interessarão por investir em um emblema tão poderoso quanto ele. Assim, será possível conseguir recursos para os esforços que poucos brasileiros e estudantes estão fazendo para a pesquisa e conservação da espécie. A conscientização nos níveis nacional e internacional poderá gerar recursos para continuarmos trabalhando e assim contribuirmos para que o muriqui possa ser visto ao vivo e a cores em seu hábitat natural pelas futuras gerações.

Este texto foi atualizado para incluir a seguinte alteração:
Além de Rio de Janeiro e São Paulo, o muriqui-do-sul é encontrado no norte do Paraná. (20/03/2013)